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9 






V 



t/ 











WEEK OF 

Sept. 15-21, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 

Sept. 15-21, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, September 15 

Denominational Meeting's. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. John Simpson, 
Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Howard 
C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. 
Sermon: "Blessed are the Meek." Broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
3:30-5:30 p.m. The President's reception honoring 

new students, 2138 Campus Drive. 
7:15 p.m. Vesper Service sponsored by the Y.M.C. A. 
and the Y.W.C.A. Woman's College Audi- 
torium. Speaker: Dr. Thomas Langford, As- 
sistant Professor of Religion. 

Monday, September 16 

7:00 p.m. Freshmen Orientation: W.S.G.A. As- 
sembly. W. C. Auditorium and Page Audi- 
torium. 



7:30 



Tuesday, September 17 



p.m. University Convocation : Address by Presi- 
dent Douglas M. Knight. Page Auditorium. 
8:30 p.m. Student Union Open House. Kilgo 
Quadrangle. 

Wednesday, September 18 

12:30 p.m. Formal Opening- of Woman's College and 
traditional Flag Raising. W. C. Auditorium 
and East Duke Court. 



5 :00-6:30 p.m. Picnic for all new students sponsored 
by Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A. East Union Build- 
ing. 

7:00-8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 p.m. Freshmen Orientation : Faculty Critique : 
A panel discussion of "The Lonely Crowd" and 
"The Lord of the Flies." W. C. Auditorium. 

Thursday, September 19 

8:10 a.m. Fall semester classes begin. 
10:10 a.m. Flag- Raising Ceremony. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

7:30 p.m. Capping Ceremony of the School of Nurs- 
ing. University Chapel. 

Friday, September 20 

10:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. David E. 

Kemp for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology. 

Room 3506 Diagnostic and Treatment Building, 

Medical Center. 
1:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Edward 

Milton Opton, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in 

Psychology. Room 206 Psychology Laboratory. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium of the 

Biological Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. 

Leen de Ruiter. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke 

Coombs Field. 



Marching Band practice. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



6:30 p.m. Church Night for new students under the 
auspices of the Denominational Groups. 

Saturday, September 21 

2 :00 p.m. Varsity Football : Duke versus University 
of South Carolina. Stadium. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. Student Union Open House. Union 
Ballroom. 

7-05-9:00 pjn. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Audi- 
torium. "A Matter of Who." Terry-Thomas 
and Alex Nichol. "The funniest. "— N. Y. 
Times. "Delightful!"— The New Yorker. "All 
laughs. "—Newsweek. "Another hilarious 
comedy from the producer of ' The Mouse that 
Roared. ' Guaranteed to hit you just right. ' — 
N. Y. Post. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain 
to the University, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship on Sunday, September 
15th, at 11:00 a.m. in the University Chapel. His 
subject will be "Blessed are the Meek." Presiding 
Minister will be the Reverend Professor James T. 
Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Assisting in the service 
will be : 

The Reverend A. Jack Wilson, Associate Director 
of Religious Activities, West Campus. 

Miss Barbara Benedict, Associate Director of 
Religious Activities, East Campus. 

The Reverend John J. Carey, Chaplain to the 
United Church of Christ Students. 

The Reverend Jackson W. Carroll, Chaplain to the 
Methodist Students. 

The Reverend Charles E. Johnson, Chaplain to the 
Presbyterian Students. 

The Reverend James W. Stines, Chaplain to 
Baptist Students. 

The Reverend William R. Patton, Chaplain to 
Lutheran Students. 

The Reverend W. Robert Mill, Chaplain to Episco- 
pal Students. 



1963 FALL REGISTRATION 

Monday, September 16, 1963, from 8:30 a.m.-12:00 
noon and 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Registration of all 
new students. All Freshmen (Woman's College, 
School of Nursing, Trinity College, and College of 
Engineering) report to the Indoor Stadium on an 
individual appointment basis to have their course 
cards written and sectioned. Directors of Under- 
graduate studies are necessary for this operation. 

Monday, September 16, 1963, from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 
p.m. Conferences on courses of study and course card 
writing for all Woman's College, and Trinity College, 
O.S.R., Transfers, and Degree Special Students by 
appointment. Departments requested to have repre- 
sentatives for this phase of registration will be notified 
by telephone. 



Monday, September 16, 1963, from 2:00-4:30 p.m. 
Registration of all O.S.R., Transfers, and Degree 
Special Students at the Indoor Stadium. 

Monday and Tuesday, September 16 and 17, 1963. 
Conferences on courses of study for all new and non 
pre-registered returning Graduate students by ap- 
pointment with their Director of Graduate Studies. 

Tuesday, September 17, 1963, from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 
noon and 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Graduate Students ap- 
proval of course schedule and arrangement of fees, 
Graduate School Office, 127 Allen Building. 

Wednesday, September 18, 1963, from 9:00 a.m.- 
12:00 noon and 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m., in the Indoor 
Stadium for Trinity College, Woman's College, School 
of Nursing, College of Engineering (only those making 
changes), and the Graduate School (new students and 
pre-registered students making changes) . The depart- 
mental representatives are concerned only with those 
pre-registered undergraduates who are making 
changes in their schedules. No registration of late 
O.S.R.'s, Transfers, or new students will be under- 
taken on this date. New and returning Graduate 
students failing to clear their course program in the 
Graduate School on Tuesday, September 17, will not 
be allowed to complete registration on Wednesday, 
September 18. They will be allowed to complete regis- 
tration on Thursday, September 19, 1963, in The 
Graduate School Office, 127 Allen Building. All de- 
partments should be represented at the registration in 
the Indoor Stadium. 



FLAG RAISING EXERCISES 

The traditional flag raising exercises in connection 
with the opening of the Woman's College will take 
place at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 18th, 
beginning in the auditorium and followed by a service 
in East Duke Court. 

On Thursday, September 19th, at 10 :10 a.m., the 
flag raising ceremony marking the official opening of 
the Academic Year, 1963-1964 will take place in front 
of Allen Building. 



CHAPEL CHOIR REHEARSAL 

The first regularly scheduled choir rehearsal of 
the new academic year will be held in the University 
Chapel on Wednesday evening, September 18th, at 
7 :00 p.m. All summer members are cordially invited 
to attend. 

Tryouts for the Chapel Choir Men's Glee Club, 
Women's Glee Club, Men's Chorus, and Women's 
Chorus will be held through the month of September. 
Please call Extension 3898 or report to Room 210 
Flowers Building for an appointment. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING PROGRAM 

The "Capping Ceremony" for the sophomore stu- 
dents of the School of Nursing will be held on Thurs- 
day, September 19th at 7 :30 p.m. in the University 
Chapel. The Chapel ceremony will be followed by a 
reception in Hanes House. Members of the University 
Community are extended a cordial invitation to attend 
these functions. 



1963 ART EXHIBITION 

The members of the University Community are ex- 
tended a cordial invitation to visit the continuous 
showing of art exhibitions being held in the Gallery 
of the Woman's College Library and the Lounge of 
the West Union Building during the hours of 8 :30 
a.m. until 10 :00 p.m. daily. Under the dual sponsor- 
ship of the Art Department and the Student Union 
Fine Arts Committee, the exhibits are open to the 
public without charge. 

The exhibitions now on display include works by 
painters who also teach and who are members of the 
faculties of the major educational institutions located 
in the Triangle Area. The East Campus Gallery 
contains primarily oil paintings and the West Gallery 
drawings of the various artists. The exhibits may be 
viewed through the month of September. 

Those exhibiting in the show include (1) from the 
School of Design, North Carolina State of the 
University of North Carolina at Raleigh : William J. 
Baron, George Bireline, Jr., Joseph H. Cox, John 
Hertzman, Ray Musselwhite, Duncan Stuart; (2) 
from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill : 
George Kachergis; (3) from North Carolina College: 
John Gordon; and (4) from Duke University: Robert 
Broderson and William K. Stars. These artists have 
had numerous works shown in national or inter- 
national exhibitions and are the recipients of many 
awards and prizes. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

1963 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

AND TICKET PRICES 

AT HOME 

Date Time Family 

p.m. Opponent Regular Plan Children 

Sept. 21— 2:00 U. of S. Caro. . $4.50 $2.50 $.50 

Oct. 19—2:00 Clemson* $4.50 $2.50 $.50 

Nov. 9—2:00 Wake Forest $4.50 $2.50 $.50 

Nov. 16 — 2:30 Navy — Dad 's Day $4.50 $2.50 $.50 

Nov. 23—2:00 U. of N. Caro. $4.50 $2.50 $.50 
"Homecoming 

AWAY 

Time 

Date p.m. Opponent Price 

Sept. 28— 1:30 Virginia $4.50 

Oct. 5— 12 :00 Maryland $4.50 

Oct. 12 — 1:30 University of California §4.00 

Oct. 26 — 1:30 North Carolina State $4.00 

Nov. 2 — 2 :00 Georgia Tech $5.50 



FAMILY PLAN 



To make it possible for faculty and staff family 
groups to attend games at a reduced price, the Duke 
Athletic Association is continuing this year a Family 
Plan for tickets. Under this plan, a section of end 
zone seats has been set aside for sale as season tickets 
to adults at $5.00 each and to children (high school 
age and under) at $2.50 each for the five home games. 
Thus, a family of four can attend all five of Duke home 
games at a total cost of $15.00. Tickets for individual 
games in this family plan area will be priced at $2.50 
each for adults and $.50 each for children. All seats 
will be reserved. 



1963 FALL PREACHING SCHEDULE 

September 15 — Freshman Sunday — The Eeverend Dr. Howard 

C. Wilkinson — Chaplain to the University 
September 22 — Opening Sunday — The Eeverend Professor 

James T. Cleland — Dean of the Chapel 
September 29 — The Reverend Dr. Creighton Lacy — Associate 

Professor of World Christianity — The Divinity School 
October 6 — World-Wide Communion — The Beverend Dr. Charles 

A. Coulson — Director of the Mathematics Institute — Oxford 

University, England 
October 13— The Reverend Dr. James L. Price, Jr.— Head of 

the Department of Religion 
October 20 — Homecoming — Dean Cleland 
October 27 — The Reverend Dr. Chester Pennington — Minister, 

Hennepin Avenue Methodist Church — Minneapolis, Minnesota 
November 3— The Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike— National 

Council of the Churches of Christ — New York, New York 
November 10 — Dean Cleland 
November 17— Dad's Day— The Reverend Dr. MeMurry S. 

Richey — Associate Professor of Theology and Nurture — The 

Divinity School 
November 24 — Chaplain Wilkinson 
December 8— The Reverend Dr. Elfan Rees— World Council of 

Churches — Geneva, Switzerland 
December 15 — Christmas Sunday— Dean Cleland 
January 5 — Dean Cleland 
January 12 — Chaplain Wilkinson 
January 19— The Reverend Professor Robert E. Cushman— 

Dean of the Divinity School 
January 26 — Dean Cleland 



LIBRARY SCHEDULE 1963-64 
General Library 

Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-ll :00 p.m. 

Undergraduate and Graduate Rooms 

open from 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 

Circulation Desk, Undergraduate Room 

open from 8:00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00p.m.- 6:00p.m. 

Graduate and Undergraduate Rooms 

open from 1:30 p.m.-12:00 p.m. 

Periodicals Room open from 1:30 p.m.-ll:00 p.m. 

Woman's College Library 

Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00a.m.- 5:00p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m.-10:30 p.m. 

Schedules for other School, College and Departmental 
Libraries will be posted. 



DINING HALL SCHEDULES 

MEAL HOURS—MEN'S DINING HALLS 



WEEKLY M 


:al Hours 




Sunday Hours 




Cafeterias : 






Cafeterias : 




Breakfast 


7:00- 


9:30 


Breakfast 


8:30-11:00 


Lunch 


11:00- 


2:00 


Lunch 


11:30- 2:00 


Dinner 


5:00- 


7:00 


Dinner 


5:00- 7:00 


Snack Bar. 


9:30-11:00 


a.m. 






Oak Room: 






Oak Room : 




Lunch 


11:30- 


2:00 


Lunch 


11:30- 2:00 


Dinner 


5:00- 


7:00 


Dinner 


5:00- 7:00 



MEAL HOURS—WOMAN'S COLLEGE DINING HALLS 
Weekly Meal Hours Sunday Hours : 

Breakfast 7:15- 8:45 Breakfast 8:30- 9:30 

Lunch 11:15- 1:30 Lunch 11:30- 1:30 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 Dinner 5:00- 6:15 

MEAL HOURS— GRADUATE CENTER DINING HALLS 
Weekly Meal Hours Sunday Hours : 

Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 Breakfast Bar Onlv 

Lunch 11:15-1:30 8:30-11 :00 a.m. 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 

Coffee Lounge: 11:30 a.m.-ll :00 p.m. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Friday, September 20th, in the Audi- 
torium of the Biological Sciences Building at 4 :15 p.m. 
Dr. Leen de Ruiter, Professor of Comparative Physi- 
ology, University of Groningen, Holland, will speak 
on "Protective Coloration and the Ecology of 
Countershading. ' ' Coffee and tea will be served in the 
foyer at 4 :00. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David E. Kemp for 
the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held on Friday, 
September 27th at 10:00 a.m. in Room 3506 in the 
Diagnostic and Treatment Building of Duke Uni- 
versity Medical Center. The subject of Mr. Kemp's 
dissertation is "Personality and Behavior in Psy- 
chotherapeutic Relationships : Correlates of a Scale of 
Therapeutic Effectiveness." The committee to con- 
duct the examination consists of Professors Martin 
Lakin, Jack Brehm, Robert C. Carson, Hans H. 
Strupp, and Alan C. Kerckhoff. Professor Lakin will 
preside. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Edward Milton 
Opton, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be 
held on Friday, September 20th at 1 :00 p.m. in Room 
206 Psychology Laboratory. The subject of Mr. 
Opton 's dissertation is " Electroencephalograph^ Cor- 
relates of Performance Lapses in Young and Old 
Men." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors "Walter D. Obrist, Lloyd J. 
Borstelmann, Gregory A. Kimble, Martin Lakin, and 
Wayland E. Hull. Professor Obrist will preside. 



DENOMINATIONAL "CHURCH NIGHT" 

Friday, September 20 

"Church Night" activities for all Baptist, Epis- 
copal. Methodist and Presbyterian students will be 
held in their respective student centers, located mid- 
way between East and West campuses. Special buses 
will leave the Chapel steps of West Campus, the 
traffic circle on East Campus, and the front of Hanes 
House, at 6:00 o'clock, to deliver students to the de- 
nominational centers. Programs will begin in those 
centers at 6 :15 P.M. The same buses will return stu- 
dents to the points of origin at the end of the ' ' Church 
Night" activities. 



The Durham Congregational Christian Church will 
provide a dinner for students of the United Church of 
Christ at the Parish House on West Main Street at 
6 :15 P.M. A special bus will come by Hanes House, 
the Chapel steps on West Campus, and the East 
Campus circle, at approximately 6 :00 P.M.. to pick up 
all members of the United Student Fellowship and 
deliver them to the Congregational Christian Church. 
Following the dinner meeting, the bus will return 
students to their points of origin. Members of other 



Protestant denominations who do not have organized 
groups on the Duke campus are invited to come to the 
dinner and to participate in the United Student 
Fellowship. 

Christian Science students will meet at the home of 
Professor and Mrs. Paul O. Williams, 703 South Duke 
Street. Auto rides will leave from the Chapel steps 
on West Campus, and from the East Campus circle 
at 5 :45 p.m. 

For Catholic students there will be a Benediction 
at 7 :30 p.m. at the Church of the Immacrdate Con- 
ception and a social hour afterwards in the school. 
The school bus will be on campus at 7 :15 p.m. in front 
of the Chapel and at 7 :20 p.m. at the East Campus 
circle. 



The opening Hillel Sabbath Eve service and pro- 
gram in honor of Freshmen will be at 7 :30 p.m. in 
the Green Room of East Duke Building. The program 
will include a preview of the Hillel year, an introduc- 
tion of officers, and will conclude with the serving of 
refreshments. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Taik Yung Kim for 
the Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry was held on August 
29th at 9 :30 a.m. in Room 262 Bell Building. The 
subject of Mr. Kim's dissertation was "The Synthesis 
and Biological Activity of Uridine-5'-diphospho-N- 
acetyl Hexosamines. ' ' The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors E. A. Davidson, 
R. L. Hill, K. S. McCarty, R. W. Wheat, and J. C. 
Poirier. Professor Davidson presided. 



WEEKLY CALENDAR INFORMATION 

This is the first issue of the University Weekly 
Calendar of Duke University for the academic year 
1963-6 4. Hereafter, the Calendar will appear every 
Saturday morning. 

Members of the faculty and staff are requested 
to have notices for publication in the Calendar in 
Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not 
later than 1 :00 p.m. on Wednesday. This is abso- 
lutely necessary in order that the Calendar may be 
handled by the printers and be ready for distribu- 
tion early Saturday morning. 

Distribution of the Calendar to faculty, staff, 
graduate and undergraduate students will be 
handled in the following fashion : 

Faculty — Copies to departmental offices unless 
an individual office is in another building in which 
case the office will receive a copy. 

Staff — Copies to various Administrative offices 
and to individual staff offices. 

Graduate Students — Copies to departmental 
offices. 

Undergraduate Students — Copies to dormitories 
for posting purposes only. 

Hospital Faculty and Staff — Copies to Hospital 
Post Office for distribution via individual boxes. 

Further clarification may be obtained by calling 
Extension 2911. 



1963-64 ARTISTS SERIES 

Season tickets priced at $8.00, $9.00, and $10.00 are availa- 
ble in Room 202-A Flowers Building. A cheek payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and should 
be mailed to Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, North Carolina. 
Call 681-0111, Extension 2911, for further information. The 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. on the 
indicated dates. The 1963-64 Series is as follows: 

THE GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER 

Puccini's "Tosca" Tuesday, December 3 

With a company of fifty including orchestra and chorus, Boris 
Goldovsky presents "Tosca" in English, fully staged with 
handsome sets and costumes. Puccini 's compelling and vital 
drama, one of the most exciting of all Grand Operas, combines 
some of the composer's most memorable arias with a vivid and 
dramatic tale of love, life, passion, murder and tragedy. 

BACH ARIA GROUP Tuesday, February 4 

William H. Scheide, Director 

Eileen Farrell, Soprano Julius Baker, Flute 

Jan Peerce, Tenor Robert Bloom, Oboe 

Carol Smith, Alto Bernard Greenhouse, Cello 

Norman Farrow, Bass-baritone Maurice Wilk, Violin 
Paul Ulanowsky, Piano 

Composed as it is, of world-famous instrumental and vocal 
soloists, this outstanding group has been uniquely able to set 
forth the central and crowning achievement of one of the 
greatest names in music. 

"Music without equal or any near parallel." . . . Paul Hume, 
Washington Post 

PRESTI AND LAGOTA, Guitar-Duo Tuesday, March 10 

Ida Presti and Alexandre Lagoya had both established them- 
selves as solo concert artists of considerable distinction when, 
in 1955 they joined forces to form a guitar-duo. In the years 
since, Presti-Lagoya have won critical praise and fervent 
audience acclaim in France, Holland, Germany, Switzerland, 
North Africa, India and Australia. Following their first 
U. S. tour the duo is already booked in Japan, Australia and 
India. In their unique and fascinating programs Presti and 
Lagoya combine original works for guitar-duo with superb 
transcriptions ranging from Bach and Scarlatti to Albeniz and 
Debussy. 



"Brilliance 
London. 



and sterling musicianship!" 



The Times, 



"These two artists are AMONG THE GREATEST OF OUR 
TIME ! " . . . Parool, Amsterdam. 

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Friday, March 20 
William Steinberg, Music Director 

Founded in 1895, the orchestra earned its fame under such 
conductors as Victor Herbert, Otto Klemperer, and Fritz Reiner. 
Under the baton of William Steinberg since 1952, the orchestra 
has grown to an exciting musical force whose reputation is now 
world-wide. Its concerts feature the great conductors and 
soloists of our time and the orchestra 's recordings on Com- 
mand Classics have been widely acclaimed. 



JOHN BROWNING, Pianist 



Friday, April 17 



John Browning has been hailed "a meteor that crashed onto 
the musical scene ' ' and these words explain why within the span 
of seven years, this pianist has become an international star. 
He is the recipient of three famous competition prizes: the 
Steinway Centennial Award, sponsored by the National Federa- 
tion of Music Clubs; the Edgar M. Leventritt Award, which 
gave him his debut with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra 
under Dimitri Mitropoulos; and the Gold Medal Award of 
the Concours International Musical Reine Elisabeth in Brussels, 
perhaps the most celebrated of all international competitions. 
"A great pianist. A real musician." . . . Lang, New YorJc 
Herald-Tribune. 



OFF-THE-SERIES ATTRACTION 1963-64 

Tuesday, November 19 
The Regimental Band and Massed Pipers of the BLACK 
WATCH (Royal Highland Regiment) with Highland Dancers 
from the Edinburg Festival 

Trumpet fanfares, rumbling drums and the stirring skirl of the 
Massed Pipers launches the brilliant and moving spectacle of 
marching ceremonies, rousing music and highland dancing which 
the world-famous Black Watch brings to North America. Two 
seasons ago hundreds of thousands cheered the colorful pageant- 
ry of Her Majesty's Scots Guards; now S. Hurok presents a 
unique opportunity to witness the thrilling ceremonial splendor 
of The Black Watch. 

The BLACK WATCH will take place in the Indoor Stadium 
and reserved seats will be priced at $2.50 and $2.00 with a 
special price of $1.50 and $1.25 to Artists Series patrons. 
Children 's tickets are priced at $1.25 and $1.00. 



CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS 

The Chamber Arts Society announces the following 
six concerts for the 1963-64 season : 

Saturday, October 19th— AMADEUS QUARTET 
Saturday, December 7th— JUILLIARD QUARTET 
Saturday, January 11th— HUNGARIAN QUARTET 
Saturday, February 8th— QUARTETTO ITALIANO 
Saturday, March 21st— FINE ARTS QUARTET 
Saturday, April 11th— NEW YORK STRING SEXTET 

These concerts will be held in the Music Room, East 
Duke Building, beginning at 8 :15 p.m. Admission : 
Membership in the Chamber Arts Society is open to all 
persons, and entitles to admission to all concerts. The 
cost of membership will be $12.00. The Committee 
of the Society limits membership to 330 persons, the 
remaining 70 admissions being available to individuals 
who purchase Guest Cards for single concerts at price 
of $2.50. These Guest Cards may be obtained at the 
door of the Music Room on concert evenings from 
7 :30 p.m. to 8 :00 p.m. 

Membership application forms will be sent out 
early in September to all present members and to any 
others who indicate their interest to the Committee. 
The Committee of the Chamber Arts Society includes : 
Frederick Bernheim, Mary L. C. Bernheim, Alan H. 
Bone, Frances C. Brown, Virginia S. Bryan, Ruth 
Friedberg, Bronislas Jezierski, Alan K. Manchester, 
Julia Mueller, Elizabeth Ropp and Ernest W. Nelson, 
Chairman (address Box 6065 College Station, Durham, 
N. C.) 



THE GOTHIC BOOKSHOP 

The Gothic Bookshop, favorite haunt of both stu- 
dents and faculty, is located by the entrance to Page 
Auditorium and is open weekdays from 8:45 a.m. to 
5 :00 p.m., on "Wednesdays from 8 :45 a.m. to 9 :00 p.m., 
and on Saturdays from 8 :45 p.m. until noon. 

Here may be found no hard-cover textbooks, but a 
most interesting and versatile stock of books in all 
fields — the latest important books as well as standard 
titles. A wide selection of first-class paperbound 
books as well as fine editions and bindings are availa- 
ble. Also in stock are good prints and twice a year 
there is a special sale of reproductions. The Gothic 
Bookshop Book and Art Auction held twice each year 
is another of the unique sendees extended the campus 
under the able direction of Mr. Jeremv North. 



JEWISH HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES 
Hillel Foundation: 

The B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation in Chapel Hill, 
located at 210 "W. Cameron Avenue, will be holding' 
services for the High Holidays, to which all members 
of the University Community are most cordially 
invited. 

Services for Rosh Hashanah will be held Wednes- 
day evening, September 18th, at 8 :00 p.m., and Thurs- ; 
day and Friday morning's, September 19th and 20th, 
at 10:00 a.m. 

Beth. El Congregation : 

Jewish High Holiday services at the Beth El 



Congregation will begin on Wednesday evening, 
September 18th, at 6:15 p.m. Services will also be 
held on Thursday and Friday mornings from 8 :00 
a.m. to 1 :00 p.m., on September 19th and 20th. All 
students and interns are cordially invited to be guests 
of the Congregation. All desiring further information 
and those desiring home hospitality may contact Mrs. 
Dan Weinberg, telephone number 489-2275. All serv- 
ices are under the supervision of Rabbi M. Herbert 
Berger and follow the traditions of Conservative 
Judaism. 

Yom Kippur Service will begin Friday, September 
27th, at 6 :00 p.m., and on Saturday, September 28th 
all day from 9 :00 a.m. to 6 :15 p.m. 



WEEK OF 

Sept. 22-28, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 

Sept. 22-28, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, September 22 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Eecital. John Simpson, 
Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 
Chapel; Preacher: The Reverend Professor 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon : 
"Jonah: A Very Minor Prophet." Broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-PM. 

Monday, September 23 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208, Asbury Building. 

Tuesday, September 24 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Thor Hall. 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. John 
Alexander Salmond for the Ph.D. degree in 
History. Room 235, Allen Building. 

2:30 p.m. The final examination of Miss Susan 
Brownlee for the Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry. 
Room 262, Bell Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



8:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium, Room 130, Build- 
ing 9, West Campus (Psychology-Sociology). 
Speaker: Dr. Mercedes Gaffron. 

Wednesday, September 25 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Thor Hall. 

4:00 p.m. Botany Seminar. Room 111, Biological 
Sciences Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. Universitv 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Audi- 
torium. "A Matter of Who." Terry-Thomas 
and Alex Nichol. "The funniest. "— N. Y. 
Times. "Delightful!"— The New Yorker. "All 
laughs. ' ' — Newsweek. ' ' Another hilarious 
comedy from the producer of 'The Mouse that 
Roared.' Guaranteed to hit you just right." 
— N. Y. Post. 

Thursday, September 26 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. Richard P. Heitzenrater. 

9:00 a.m. The final examination of Mrs. Eloise 
Railings Lewis for the Ph.D. degree in Educa- 
tion. Room 8A, West Duke. 

4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Slide Rule Lecture. Engineering Audi- 
torium. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:00 p.m. English Department Lecture. Lady 
Mander. Banquet Room, Woman's College 
Union. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, September 27 

10:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. David E. 

Kemp for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology. 

Room 3506 Diagnostic and Treatment Building, 

Medical Center. 
10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Professor Thor Hall and Mr. Karl L. Bucey. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Robert M. 

Sitton for the Ph.D. degree in Philosophy. 

Room 103, Library. 
3:00 p.m. ARO(D) Seminar. Speaker : Dr. Turgut 

Sarpkaya. ARO(D) Auditorium. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band practice. 

Coombs Field. 
4:30-6:00 p.m. Reception Honors Woodrow Wilson 

Fellows. Union Ballroom. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 

and under must be accompanied by their 

mothers. 

Saturday, September 28 

11:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. Mahinder 
D. Chaudhry for the Ph.D. degree in Eco- 
nomics. Room 125, Allen Building. 

2:00 p.m. Varsity Football : Duke versus University 
of Virginia. Charlottesville, Virginia. 

7:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"A Matter of Who." Terrv-Thomas and Alex 
Nichol. "The funniest."— N. Y. Times. "De- 
lightful ! "—The New Yorker. "All laughs." 
— Newsweek. ' ' Another hilarious comedy from 
the producer of 'The Mouse that Roared.' 
Guaranteed to hit you just right." — N. Y. Post. 
10:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures present a "HOOT- 
ENANNY SHOW." Page Auditorium. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Sunday, 9:00-9:30 
A.M., Baptist Student Center. Coffee and do-nuts 
served followed by rides provided to local churches. 



Wednesday, 7:00 P.M., Center, Worship. Friday, 
6 :00 P.M., Supper at the Center followed by seminars : 
Dr. Tom Langf orcl — ' ' The College Student and Basic 
Moral Decisions"; Dr. Robert Osborn — "Existential 
Themes in Old Testament Literature ' ' ; and Chaplain 
Stines — "Christianity and the Modern Parables." 
METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9 :00 A.M., Center, 
Freshman Forum — A series of discussions on topics 
of particular interest to freshmen. A light breakfast 
will be served each Sunday followed by the discus- 
sion. The topic for Sunday morning will be "Mem- 
bers One of Another. " Leaders will be Chaplain Jack 
Carroll, Mr. Wayne Smith, and Miss Ella Jean Shore. 
Cars will leave the East Campus Circle and the Chapel 
Steps at 8 :55 A.M. Freshmen are cordially invited to 
attend ; 6 :00 P.M., Center, Evening Prayer. Wednes- 
day, 6 :00 P.M., Holy Communion. 
PRESBYTERIAN (WESTMINSTER) FELLOW- 
SHIP: Sunday, 5:30 P.M., Westminster House, 
Vespers and Supper. All Presbyterian students and 
faculty welcome. 

UNITED STUDENT FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 5:00 
P.M., Durham Congregational Christian Church, 
Supper, followed by discussion led by Chaplain John 
Carey on the topic, "The Church and the University." 
Transportation will leave the Chapel steps, the East 
Campus circle and Hanes House at 4 :45 P.M. 
HILLEL FOUNDATION: Sunday, 2:30 P.M. Hillel 
House in Chapel Hill, N. C. Opening Social Affair 
for Jewish students at all N. C. campuses. Duke 
students are cordiallv invited to this function. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of 
the Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, Septem- 
ber 22nd, in the University Chapel. His subject will 
be "Jonah: A Very Minor Prophet." The order of 
worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University. 
Lector: Dr. Douglas M. Knight, President of the University. 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Choral in E Major Cesar FrancTc 
Call to Worship — "The Lord Is in His Holy Temple" 

Calvin W. Laufer 
Hymn — ' ' Holy, Holy, Holy ! ' ' John B. Dyles 

The Prayer of Confession 
Words of Assurance 
The Lord 's Prayer 
Anthem — ' ' My Shepherd Will Supply My Need ' ' 

Virgil Thomson 
Scripture — Jonah : selected verses 

Hymn — "O Word of God Incarnate" M. M. Gesanghuch 
Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayer of Adoration, Thanksgiving, Intercession, 

Petition and Dedication 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "Sound, All Ye Spheres!" Henry Parcell 

Response — The Doxology 

Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — ' ' Jonah : A Very Minor Prophet ' ' 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Dresden Amen" Dresden 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ A'oluntary — Toccata from Symphony V 

Charles Marie Widor 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 
The first Psychology Colloquium will be held in 
Building 9, West Campus (Psychology-Sociology), 
Room 130, 8:00 p.m., on Tuesday, September 24th. 
Dr. Gaffron, Associate Research Professor in Psy- 
chology at Duke, will speak on "A Phenomenal 
Analysis of Egyptian Art Forms and Landscape," 
showing some of the photographic material collected 
last fall in Egypt by her, together with Dr. Karl 
Zener, and Dr. Friedrich Krauss of Munich as archeo- 
logical consultant, for a psychological study of art 
forms in relation to ecology. All interested persons 
are invited. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Alexander 
Salmond for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held 
on Tuesday, September 24th, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 
235, Allen' Building. The subject of Mr. Salmond 's 
dissertation is "Roosevelt's Tree Army: A History 
of the Civilian Conservation Corps, 1933-1942." The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Robert I. Crane, Alan K. Manchester, 
Robert H. Woody, Richard Leach, and Richard L. 
Watson, Jr. Professor Watson will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Miss Susan Brownlee for 
the Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry will be held on Tues- 
day, September 24th, at 2 :30 p'.m. in Room 262, Bell 
Building. The subject of Miss Brownlee 's dissertation 
is "Studies on Galactosamine Uronic Acid and Other 
Acid Amino Sugars Obtained from Vi Antigen 
Producing Bacteria." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Robert W. Wheat, 
William L. Byrne, Henry Kamin, Jaeque C. Poirier, 
and Pelham Wilder, Jr. Professor Wheat will preside. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 
The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
September 25th at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building (Auditorium) on West Campus. 
Reports on A.I.B.S. Meetings. Refreshments will be 
served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mrs. Eloise Railings 
Lewis for the Ph.D. degree in Education will be held 
on Thursday, September 26th, at 9 :00 a.m. in Room 
8A, West Duke. The subject of Mrs. Lewis' disserta- 
tion is "Faculty Appointment Practices in the Col- 
legiate Schools of Nursing in the Southern Region 
Which Offer Nationally Accredited Programs. ' ' The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors E. C. Bolmeier, W. S. Gehman, W. A. Stumpf, 
W. H. Cartwright, and Edgar Thompson. Professor 
E. C. Bolmeier will preside. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council will meet on Thursday, 
September 26th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building to hear a report from the Chairman. Infor- 
mation on policy trends and recent actions of the 
federal government relating to higher education will 
be presented by Professors Paul Gross and Philip 
Handler. 



SLIDE RULE LECTURE 

The first of the annual Slide Rule Lectures will be 
presented in the Engineering Auditorium on Thurs- 
day, September 26th, at 7 :00 p.m. Speaking on the 
history, care and types of slide rules will be Professors 
Otto Meier and R. E. Lewis and Mr. J. D. Wellons. 
Since sample problems and examples will be studied, 
it is desirable that those attending bring slide rules. 
Sponsored jointly by Tau Beta Pi and The Order of 
Saint Patrick, the lectures are open to the public. 



ENGLISH DEPARTMENT LECTURE 

Rosalie Glenn Grylls (in private life Lady 
Mander), the author of a number of works on nine- 
teenth century English literature, will speak at 8 :00 
p.m., on Thursday, September 26th, in the Banquet 
Room, Woman's College Union. Her topic will be 
"Dante Gabriel Rossetti : Poet and Painter." Lady 
Mander is at present writing a biography of Rossetti, 
and while at Duke will consult the Rossetti manu- 
scripts in the Duke Library. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David E. Kemp for 
the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held on Friday, 
September 27th at 10:00 a.m. in Room 3506 in the 
Diagnostic and Treatment Building of Duke Uni- 
versity Medical Center. The subject of Mr. Kemp's 
dissertation is "Personality and Behavior in Psy- 
chotherapeutic Relationships : Correlates of a Scale of 
Therapeutic Effectiveness." The committee to eon- 
duet the examination consists of Professors Martin 
Lakin, Jack Brehm, Robert C. Carson, Hans H. 
Strupp, and Alan C. Kerckhoff. Professor Lakin will 
preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Robert M. Sitton for 
the Ph.D. degree in Philosophy will be held on Friday, 
September 27th, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 103 West 
Library. The subject of Mr. Sitton 's dissertation is 
"The Ontological Status of the Work of Art: Three 
Contemporary Views. " The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Paul Welsh, Charles 
A. Baylis, Bernard Peach, Romane Clark, and Herman 
Salinger. Professor Paul Welsh will preside. 



ARO(D) SEMINAR 

The U. S. Army Research Office will present a 
seminar on "Stability Of Pulsating Viscous Flow" by 
Dr. Turgut Sarpkaya, on Friday, September 27th, at 
3 :30 p.m. There will be refreshments at 3 :00 p.m. 
in ARO(D) Auditorium. 

Dr. Sarpkaya is a professor in the Department of 
Engineering Mechanics, University of Nebraska, 
Lincoln. He is the chief investigator on an ARO(D) 
project, which is investigating turbulence generation 
in pulsating viscous flow. He received his Ph.D. 
in Engineering Mechanics and Hydraulics from the 
Hydraulics Institute, State University of Iowa and 
the M.S. in Civil Engineering from the Technical 
University of Istanbul. He has been research engineer 
at M.I.T., Hydrodynamics Laboratory, lecturer at 
the University of Paris, and chief research engineer 
for the State Hydraulics Works of Turkey. He re- 
ceived the Collingwood prize from the ASCE for his 
paper on "Oscillatory Gravity Waves in Flowing 
Water." 

All interested persons are cordially invited. 



RECEPTION HONORS WOODROW WILSON 
FELLOWS 

A reception will be given on Friday, September 
27th. from 4 :30 to 6 :00 p.m. in the Union Ballroom, in 
honor of those who will enter the Duke Graduate 
School for the first time this year as fellows of the 
Woorlrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. 

Other honored guests will include Woodrow Wilson 
fellows who entered the Graduate School in 1961 and 
1962. and their wives. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Mahinder D. 
Cliaudhry for the Ph.D. degree in Economics will be 
held on Saturday, September 28th, at 11 :00 a.m. in 
Room 125 Allen Building. The subject of Mr. 
Chaudhry's dissertation is "Regional Accounting 
within India." The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors F. A. Hanna. C. B. 
Hoover, R. S. Smith, W. P. Yohe. and R, T. Cole. 
Professor Hanna will preside. 



"HOOTENANNY SHOW" 

Quadrangle Pictures will present a "Hootenanny" 
Show in Page Auditorium on Saturday, September 
28th at 10:00 p.m. The show will feature a well- 
known folk group, The Gaslight Singers and soloists, 
Carolyn Hester and Mike Settle. Tickets will be 
priced at $1.00 general admission and the doors will 
open at 9 :15 p.m. following the Quadrangle Pictures 
earlier single showing of the film, ' ' A Matter of Who. ' ' 

Fast becoming one of the most sought after 
folksinging groups, the Gaslight Singers is composed 
of three young men. Earl Zimmerman, Al Alcabes, 
and Jeff Hyman and one young lady, Martha Velez. 
The group met and organized their group as college 
students and, after tremendously successful per- 



formances in the Village and a SRO concert in 
Carnegie Hall, they gained their big reputation at 
Washington's top folk room, "the Shadows." 

Considered by folk authorities as one of the best 
voices in folk music today, Carolyn Hester, combined 
her Texas beauty and talent to be the only American 
woman folksinger to represent the United States at the 
1963 Edinburgh Festival where she was enthusiasti- 
cally received. 

Mike Settle, the young male soloist, is a multi- 
talented artist who had two Carnegie Hall appearances 
before he was twenty-one years old and whose original 
lyric and musical compositions are used not only by 
him but by all top folk artists in their recordings and 
performances. 



WEEKLY CALENDAR INFORMATION 

This is the second issue of the University Weekly 
Calendar of Duke University for the academic year 
1963-64. The Calendar appears every Saturday 
morning. 

Members of the faculty and staff are requested 
to have notices for publication in the Calendar in 
Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not 
later than 1 :00 p.m. on Wednesday. This is abso- 
lutely necessary in order that the Calendar may be 
handled by the printers and be ready for distribu- 
tion early Saturday morning. 

Distribution of the Calendar to faculty, staff, 
graduate and undergraduate students will be 
handled in the following fashion : 

Faculty — Copies to departmental offices unless 
an individual office is in another building in which 
case the office will receive a copy. 

Staff — Copies to various Administrative offices 
and to individual staff offices. 

Graduate Students — Copies to departmental 
offices. 

Undergraduate Students — Copies to dormitories 
for posting purposes only. 

Hospital Faculty and Staff — Copies to Hospital 
Post Office for distribution via individual boxes. 

Further clarification may be obtained by calling 
Extension 2911. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

1963 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

AND TICKET PRICES 



AT HOME 

Time 
Date p.m. Opponent Regular 

Sept. 21— 2:00 V. of S. Caro. . $4.50 

Oct. 19—2:00 Clemson* $4.50 

Nov. 9—2:00 Wake Forest $4.50 

Nov. 16 — 2:30 Navy — Dad's Day $4.50 

Nov. 23—2:00 U. of N. Caro. $4.50 
* Homecoming 



Date 



Time 
p.m. 
Sept. 28— 1:30 
Oct. 5—12:00 
12— 1:30 
26— 1:30 
2— 2:00 



Oct. 
Oct. 

Nov 



AWAY 

Opponent 

Virginia 

Maryland 

University of California 
North Carolina State - - 
Georgia Tech . 



Family 
Plan Children 

$2.50 $.50 

$2.50 $.50 

$2.50 $.50 

$2.50 $.50 

$2.50 $.50 



Price 
$4.50 
$4.50 
$4.00 
$4.00 
$5.50 



FAMILY PLAN 

To make it possible for faculty and staff family 
groups to attend games at a reduced price, the Duke 
Athletic Association is continuing this year a Family 
Plan for tickets. Under this plan, a section of end 
zone seats has been set aside for sale as season tickets 
to adults at $5.00 each and to children (high school 
age and under) at $2.50 each for the five home games. 
Thus, a family of four can attend all five of Duke home 
games at a total cost of $15.00. Tickets for individual 
games in this family plan area will be priced at $2.50 
each for adults and $.50 each for children. All seats 
will be reserved. 



LIBRARY SCHEDULE 1963-64 

General IAbrary 

Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-ll :00 p.m. 

Undergraduate and Graduate Rooms 

open from 8:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 

Circulation Desk, Undergraduate Room 

open from 8:00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. 

Graduate and Undergraduate Rooms 

open from 1:30 p.m.-12:00 p.m. 

Periodicals Room open from 1:30 p.m.-ll:00 p.m. 

Woman's College Library 

Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m.-10:30 p.m. 

Schedules for other School, College and Departmental 
Libraries will be posted. 



DINING HALL SCHEDULES 



MEAL HOURS— MEN'S DINING BALLS 
Sunday Hours 
Cafeterias : 
Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 



Weekly Meal Hours 
Cafeterias : 

Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 

Lunch 11:00- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 

Snack Bar: 9:30-11:00 a.m. 

Oak Room: 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 



8:30-11:00 

11:30- 2:00 

5:00- 7:00 



Oak Room: 

Lunch 

Dinner 



11:30- 2:00 
5:00- 7:00 



MEAL BOURS— WOMAN'S COLLEGE DINING BALLS 



Weekly Meal Hours 
Breakfast 7:15- 8:45 

Lunch 11:15- 1:30 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 



Sunday Hours: 

Breakfast 8:30- 9:30 

Lunch 11:30- 1:30 

Dinner 5:00- 6:15 



MEAL HOURS— GRADUATE CENTER DINING BALLS 



Weekly Meal Hours 
Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 

Lunch 11:15- 1:30 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 

Coffee Lounge: 11:30 a.m.-ll: 00 p.m. 



Sunday Hours: 
Breakfast Bar Only 

8:30-11:00 a.m. 



1963-64 ARTISTS SERIES 

Season tickets priced at $8.00, $9.00, and $10.00 are availa- 
ble in Room 202-A Flowers Building. A check payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and should 
be mailed to Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, North Carolina. 



Call 681-0111, Extension 2911, for further information. The 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. on the 
indicated dates. The 1963-64 Series is as follows: 



THE GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER 

Puccini's "Tosca" Tuesday, December 3 

With a company of fifty including orchestra and chorus, Boris 
Goldovsky presents ' ' Tosca ' ' in English, fully staged with 
handsome sets and costumes. Puccini 's compelling and vital 
drama, one of the most exciting of all Grand Operas, combines 
some of the composer's most memorable arias with a vivid and 
dramatic tale of love, life, passion, murder and tragedy. 



BACH ARIA GROUP Tuesday, February 4 

William H. Scheide, Director 

Eileen Farrell, Soprano Julius Baker, Flute 

Jan Peerce, Tenor Robert Bloom, Oboe 

Carol Smith, Alto Bernard Greenhouse, Cello 

Norman Farrow, Bass-baritone Maurice Wilk, Violin 
Paul Ulanowsky, Piano 

Composed as it is, of world-famous instrumental and vocal 
soloists, this outstanding group has been uniquely able to set 
forth the central and crowning achievement of one of the 
greatest names in music. 



"Music without equal or any near parallel. 
Washington Post 



Paul Hume, 



PRESTI AND LAGOYA, Guitar-Duo Tuesday, March 10 

Ida Presti and Alexandre Lagoya had both established them- 
selves as solo concert artists of considerable distinction when, 
in 1955 they joined forces to form a guitar-duo. In the years 
since, Presti-Lagoya have won critical praise and fervent 
audience acclaim in France, Holland, Germany, Switzerland, 
North Africa, India and Australia. Following their first 
U. S. tour the duo is already booked in Japan, Australia and 
India. In their unique and fascinating programs Presti and 
Lagoya combine original works for guitar-duo with superb 
transcriptions ranging from Bach and Scarlatti to Albeniz and 
Debussy. 

"Brilliance and sterling musicianship!" . 
London. 



The Times, 



"These two artists are AMONG THE GREATEST OF OUR 
TIME ! " . . . Parool, Amsterdam. 



PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Friday, March 20 
William Steinberg, Music Director 

Founded in 1895, the orchestra earned its fame under such 
conductors as Victor Herbert, Otto Klemperer, and Fritz Reiner. 
Under the baton of William Steinberg since 1952, the orchestra 
has grown to an exciting musical force whose reputation is now 
world-wide. Its concerts feature the great conductors and 
soloists of our time and the orchestra's recordings on Com- 
mand Classics have been widely acclaimed. 



JOHN BROWNING, Pianist 



Friday, April 17 



John Browning has been hailed "a meteor that crashed onto 
the musical scene ' ' and these words explain why within the span 
of seven years, this pianist has become an international star. 
He is the recipient of three famous competition prizes: the 
Steinway Centennial Award, sponsored by the National Federa- 
tion of Music Clubs; the Edgar M. Leventritt Award, which 
gave him his debut with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra 
under Dimitri Mitropoulos ; and the Gold Medal Award of 
the Concours International Musical Reine Elisabeth in Brussels, 
perhaps the most celebrated of all international competitions. 
"A great pianist. A real musician." . . . Lang, New York 
Berald-Tribune. 



OFF-THE-SERIES ATTRACTION 1963-64 

Tuesday, November 19 
The Eegimental Band and Massed Pipers of the BLACK 
WATCH (Royal Highland Regiment) with Highland Dancers 
from the Edinburg Festival 

Trumpet fanfares, rumbling drums and the stirring skirl of the 
Massed Pipers launches the brilliant and moving spectacle of 
marching ceremonies, rousing music and highland dancing which 
the world-famous Black Watch brings to North America. Two 
seasons ago hundreds of thousands cheered the colorful pageant- 
ry of Her Majesty's Scots Guards; now S. Hurok presents a 
unique opportunity to witness the thrilling ceremonial splendor 
of The Black Watch. 

The BLACK WATCH will take place in the Indoor Stadium 
and reserved seats will be priced at $2.50 and $2.00 with a 
special price of $1.50 and $1.25 to Artists Series patrons. 
Children's tickets are priced at $1.25 and $1.00. 



CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS 

The Chamber Arts Society announces the following 
six concerts for the 1963-64 season : 

Saturday, October 19th— AMABEUS QUARTET 
Saturday, December 7th— JUILLIARD QUARTET 
Saturday, January 11th— HUNGARIAN QUARTET 
Saturday, February 8th— QUARTETTO ITALIANO 
Saturday, March 21st— FINE ARTS QUARTET 
Saturday, April 11th— NEW YORK STRING SEXTET 

These concerts will be held in the Music Room, East 
Duke Building, beginning at 8:15 p.m. Admission: 
Membership in the Chamber Arts Society is open to all 
persons, and entitles to admission to all concerts. The 
cost of membership will be $12.00. The Committee 
of the Society limits membership to 330 persons, the 
remaining 70 admissions being available to individuals 
who purchase Guest Cards for single concerts at price 
of $2.50. These Guest Cards may be obtained at the 
door of the Music Room on concert evenings from 
7 :30 p.m. to 8 :00 p.m. 

Membership application forms will be sent out 
early in September to all present members and to any 
others who indicate their interest to the Committee. 
The Committee of the Chamber Arts Society includes : 
Frederick Bernheim, Mary L. C. Bernheim, Alan H. 
Bone, Frances C. Brown, Virginia S. Bryan, Ruth 
Friedberg, Bronislas Jezierski, Alan K. Manchester, 
Julia Mueller, Elizabeth Ropp and Ernest W. Nelson, 
Chairman (address Box 6065 College Station, Durham, 
N. C.) 



THE GOTHIC BOOKSHOP 

The Gothic Bookshop, favorite haunt of both stu- 
dents and faculty, is located by the entrance to Page 
Auditorium and is open weekdays from 8 :45 a.m. to 
5 :00 p.m., on Wednesdays from 8 :45 a.m. to 9 :00 p.m., 
and on Saturdays from 8 :45 p.m. until noon. 

Here may be found no hard-cover textbooks, but a 
most interesting and versatile stock of books in all 
fields — the latest important books as well as standard 
titles. A wide selection of first-class paperbound 
books as well as fine editions and bindings are availa- 
ble. Also in stock are good prints and twice a year 
there is a special sale of reproductions. The Gothic 



Bookshop Book and Art Auction held twice each year 
is another of the unique services extended the campus 
under the able direction of Mr. Jeremy North. 



STUDENT LOAN REPRODUCTIONS 

Starting Monday, September 23rd, and continuing 
through Friday, September 27th, between the hours 
of 9 :00 a.m. and 5 :00 p.m. Student Loan Pictures 
will be available, free of charge, through the Depart- 
ment of Art, in Room 103 Asbury Building. The 
pictures are framed for hanging and are reproduc- 
tions of oil-paintings, watercolors and etchings. 



ART LOAN COLLECTION 

The Duke University Art Loan Collection is now 
available for rental in Room 103 Asbury Building, 
Monday through Friday from 9 :00 a.m. through 5 :00 
p.m. The collection contains reproductions of con- 
temporary art and also some originals. The pictures 
are rented per semester. Rental fee $3.00, to be paid 
in advance. 



1963 ART EXHIBITIONS 

The members of the University Community are ex- 
tended a cordial invitation to visit the continuous 
showing of art exhibitions being held in the Gallery 
of the Woman's College Library and the Lounge of 
the West Union Building during the hours of 8 :30 
a.m. until 10 :00 p.m. daily. Under the dual sponsor- 
ship of the Art Department and the Student Union 
Fine Arts Committee, the exhibits are open to the 
public without charge. 

The exhibitions now on display include works by 
painters who also teach and who are members of the 
faculties of the major educational institutions located 
in the Triangle Area. The East Campus Gallery 
contains primarily oil paintings and the West Gallery 
drawings of the various artists. The exhibits may be 
viewed through the month of September. 

Those exhibiting in the show include (1) from the 
School of Design, North Carolina State of the 
University of North Carolina at Raleigh: William J. 
Baron, George Bireline, Jr., Joseph H. Cox, John 
Hertzman, Ray Musselwhite, Duncan Stuart; (2) 
from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill : 
George Kachergis; (3) from North Carolina College: 
John Gordon; and (4) from Duke University: Robert 
Broderson and William K. Stars. These artists have 
had numerous works shown in national or inter- 
national exhibitions and are the recipients of many 
awards and prizes. 



FIRST ORGAN RECITAL 

The first organ recital of the academic year will be 
presented by Mildred L. Hendrix, University Organist, 
on Homecoming Afternoon, October 20th, at 4 :00 p.m. 
At this time Mrs. Hendrix will present a program of 
French Organ Music. 



WEEK OF 



Sept. 29-Oct. 5, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Sept. 29-Oct. 5, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, September 29 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. John Simpson, 
Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Creighton Lacy, Associate Professor of World 
Christianity, The Divinity School. Sermon: 
' ' Open Sesame ! ' ' Broadcast over Radio Station 
WDNC and WDNC-FM. 



Monday, September 30 

10:00 a.m. Law School Lectures. Courtroom of the 
Law School. Speaker : Dr. Walter F. Murphy. 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Neal Gilles- 
pie for the Ph.D. degree in History. Room 122 
Allen Building. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Speakers : Jeremy 
J. Hatch and Jack P. Hailman. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00-6:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208, Asbury Building. 

7:30 p.m. Woman's College Fall Honors Assembly. 
Woman's College Auditorium. Speaker: Dean 
M. Margaret Ball. 

7:45 p.m. Durham Civic Choral Society Rehearsal. 
Durham High School. 



Tuesday, October 1 



10:10 
3:30- 
4:15- 
5:00- 
5:30 
7:00 

7:00 
7:00 

7:30 
8:00- 



York Chapel. 



a.m. Divinity School Chapel. 
Professor Charles K. Robinson. 

5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

p.m. Honors-Masters Dinner. Old Trinity 
Room. 

p.m. S. U. Away Football Movie: Duke vs. 
University of Virginia. Commentator: Coach 
C. M. Falcone. Page Auditorium. 

p.m. Open Meeting for Honors-Masters Pro- 
gram. Room 110 Flowers Building. 

p.m. The final examination of Mr. Fred 
Sandusky for the Ed.D. degree in Education. 
Room 8A West Duke Building. 

p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 
Card Gymnasium. 

10:00 p.m. International Reception. Lounge of 
Men's Graduate Center. 

Wednesday, October 2 



York Chapel. 



10:10 p.m. Diviuity School Chapel. 
Professor Charles K. Robinson. 

3:30 p.m. University Religious Council Retreat. 
Camp New Hope. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



4:30 p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Colloquium. Room 114 
Physics Building. Speaker : Dr. Richard Setlow. 

5:00-6 :00p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Audi- 
torium. Ingmar Bergman's "Through a Glass 
Darkly." (Swedish) Academy Award Winner, 
Best Foreign Film with Harriet Andersson and 
Max von Sydow. "Eloquent, poetic, and 
worshipful. . . . one of the best of Bergman's 
creations. ' ' — Time Magazine. 

Thursday, October 3 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. Ronald A. Koonts. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology Seminar. Room M 204 Davi- 
son Building. Speaker : Dr. Aubrey Naylor. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00-6:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:30 p.m. Honors-Masters Dinner. Old Trinity 
Room. 

7:00 p.m. Slide Rule Lecture. Auditorium of the 
Engineering Building. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. "West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, October 4 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Charles K. Robinson and Mr. David 
L. Baxter. 

3:00 p.m. Political Science Graduate Seminar. Room 
208 Flowers Building. Speaker: Professor 
Percy H. Partridge. 

4:00 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 01 
Chemistry Building. Speaker: Professor C. A. 
Coulson. 

4:00 p.m. Kickoff Meeting for United Fund Cam- 
paign. Room 125 English Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 



8:15 p.m. Student Union Young Artists Series: 
Richard Dyer-Bennet, folksinger. Page Audi- 
torium. 

Saturday, October 5 

10:30 a.m. Special Physics Seminar. Room 114 
Physics Building. Speaker: Dr. Charles A. 
Coidson, F.R.S. Oxford University. 

2 :00 p.m. Varsity Football : Duke vs. University of 
Maryland. Tobacco Bowl. Richmond, Virginia. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Audi- 
torium. Ingmar Bergman's "Through a Glass 
Darkly." (Swedish) Academy Award Winner, 
Best Foreign Film with Harriet Andersson and 
Max von Sydow. "Eloquent, poetic, and 
worshipful. . . . one of the best of Bergman's 
creations." — Time Magazine. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Sunday, 9:00-9:30 
A.M., Center, Coffee and doughnuts followed by rides 
to local churches ; 2 :15 P.M., Rides leave East and 
West circles for Murdoch School at Butner for a 
session of planning for teaching retarded children. 
All interested persons are invited to participate. 
Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Center, Supper, followed by semi- 
nars led by Drs. Langford and Osborn and Chaplain 
Stines. 

EPISCOPAL UNIVERSITY CENTER: Sunday 
(Feast of St. Michael), 9 :30 A.M., Holy Communion; 
12 :30 P.M., Picnic. Transportation will be provided 
from East circle and independent parking lot on West 
at 12:30. Monday, 7:00 P.M., "Evenings of Dia- 
logue"; Leader — Dr. W. D. White. Wednesday, 
7 :10 A.M. and 5 :30 P.M., Center, Holy Communion. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Sunday, 
6:30 P.M., Green Room, East Duke Building, Dis- 
cussion led by Roger Erickson on : Critique : L. S. A. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9:00 A.M., Center, 
Freshman Forum — A Discussion of Catcher in the Rye 
Vs. Lord of the Flies (light breakfast preceding) ; 
6 :00 P.M., Center, Evening Praver. Wednesday, 
7:00 A.M., East Duke Chapel, Holy Communion; 
Rides leave West campus main student parking lot at 
6 :55 A.M. 

Beginning of Seminars for fall semester: (1) 
"Contemporary Criticisms of Christianity," for 
graduate students, organizational meeting at Men's 
Graduate Center, Monday, September 30, 9 :00 P.M., 
Cranford Johnson, Leader. (2) "The Meaning of 
Freedom," for all interested students, organizational 
meeting at Methodist Center, Tuesday, October 1, 6 :45 
P.M., Franklin Ingram, Leader (Concluding in time 
for International Tea). (3) Community of Lay 
Scholars, A two year community for lay theological 
education. For further information, call Jack Car- 
roll at the Methodist Center. 286-9230, or Miss 
Barbara Benedict, extension 2909. 

PRESBYTERIAN (WESTMINSTER) FELLOW- 
SHIP: Sunday, 5:30 P.M., Westminster House, 



[2] 



Vespers and Supper; Second half of "For Heaven's 
Sake." 

UNITED STUDENT FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 5:00 
P.M., Home of Dr. and Mrs. Robert Bonar, 3306 
Chapel Hill Road, A discussion will be led by Chaplain 
John Carey on the topic, "Student Anxieties — For 
Better or Worse?" Transportation will leave the 
Chapel steps, the East Campus circle and Hanes House 
at 4 :45 P.M. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Creighton Lacy, Associate Pro- 
fessor of World Christianity, The Divinity School, 
will deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday, September 29th, 
in the University Chapel. His subject will be "Open, 
Sesame!" The order of worship follows: 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University. 
Lector: The Eeverend Cranford Johnson, Assistant Chaplain 

to Methodist Students. 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Prelude and Fugue in D minor 

PacheXbel 
Chorale Prelude — "Auf Meinen Lieben Gott" Banff 

Call to Worship — ' ' The Lord Is in His Holy Temple ' ' 

Calvin W. Latifer 
Hymn — "Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart" Arthur H. Messiter 

The Prayer of Confession 
Words of Assurance 
The Lord 's Prayer 
Anthem — ' ' Holy, Holy, Holy ' ' from Sanctus 

G. P. da Palestrina 
Scripture Lesson — Luke 24:13-53 

Hymn— "Spirit of Life" H. Percy Smith 

Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayer of Adoration, Thanksgiving, Intercession, 

Petition and Dedication 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "Thy Word Is A Lantern" Henry Pureell 

Response — The Doxology 

Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — ' ' Open, Sesame ! ' ' 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Dresden Amen" Dresden 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Chaconne in D minor Paclielbel 



GOTHIC BOOKSHOP— SALE OF PRINTS 

On Monday, September 30th and continuing for 
one week the Gothic Bookshop will conduct a sale of 
prints at $1.00 each. There will be large prints, 
averaging 20 inches by 24 inches, of famous paintings 
and faithful reproductions printed in full color in 
Europe. 



LAW SCHOOL LECTURES 

The initial address in the Law School Lecture 
Series will be presented by Dr. Walter F. Murphy, 
Professor in the Department of Politics, Princeton 
University. The lecture is open to the public and will 
be presented in the Law School Courtroom at 10 :00 
a.m. on Monday, September 30th. Dr. Murphy will 
speak on "Ethics of Judicial Compromise." Coffee 
will be served at 2 :00 p.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Neal Gillespie for the 
Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Monday, 
September 30th at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 122 Allen Build- 
ing. The subject of Mr. Gillespie's dissertation is 
"George Frederick Holmes and the Philosophy of 
Faith." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors I. B. Holley, Jr., R. S. Rogers, 
E. W. Nelson, J. T. Lanning, and Joel Colton. Pro- 
fessor Holley will preside. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Departmeut will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, September 30th, in the Audi- 
torium of the Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 
p.m. Jeremy J. Hatch and Jack P. Hailman, of the 
Department of Zoology, will speak on "Las Islas 
Encantadas — A Galapagos Travelogue." Coffee and 
tea will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



FALL HONORS ASSEMBLY 

The Woman's College Fall Honors Assembly will 
be held on Monday, September 30th, at 7 :30 p.m., 
in the Woman 's College Auditorium. Dr. M. Margaret 
Ball, Dean of the Woman's College, will address the 
Assembly on the subject: "Scholarship and the Com- 
munity of Scholars." The public is extended a 
cordial invitation to attend this meeting. 



DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY 

The Durham Civic Choral Society, a non-profit 
organization and a participating member of the Allied 
Arts, has begun its fifteenth year with the first meeting 
of the fall season held this Monday, September 23rd, at 
7 :45 p.m. Dr. Paul R. Bryan of the Music Depart- 
ment is directing the ten weekly rehearsals in the 
chorus room at Durham High School. The first of 
the two concerts will be presented on November 25th. 
All adult singers of Duke and the Research Triangle 
area are cordially invited to join the Society. 

The November performance will feature Franz 
Joseph Haydn's "Te Deum" and Giacomo Puccini's 
"Messa di Gloria." 



HONORS-MASTERS PROGRAM AND DINNER 

The Honors-Masters program will begin its activi- 
ties for the year with a dinner in honor of the fifty- 
eight new pregraduates in the program. The dinner 
will be in the Old Trinity Room on Tuesday night, 
October 1st, at 5 :30 p.m. On Thursday night, Octo- 
ber 3rd, at the same time and place, there will be a 
dinner for the twenty-eight seniors in the program. 

All seniors who are interested in graduate work in 
the arts and sciences are invited to an open meeting 
on Thursday, October 3rd, 7 :00 p.m., in Room 110 
Flowers Building. The faculty committee for the 
Honors-Masters program will discuss such matters as 



[3 



scholarship possibilities, language preparation, and 
the Graduate Record Examination. 

The committee members are Professors Merle 
Bevington, Louis Budd, John Fein, Richard Leach, 
and Robert Durden, Chairman. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE ED.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Fred Sandusky for 
the Ed.D. degree in Education will be held on Tuesday, 
October 1st at 7:00 p.m. in Room 8A, West Duke 
Building. The subject of Mr. Sandusky's dissertation 
is "The Admissions Practices and Procedures to the 
Bachelor of Divinity Program of Studies of the 
Accredited Protestant Theological Seminaries in the 
United States." The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors "W. A. Stumpf, 
0. L. Petty, E. C. Bolmeier, Robert S. Rogers, and 
R. L. Tuthill. Professor Stnmpf will preside. 



INTERNATIONAL RECEPTION 

The University Religious Council invites all foreign 
students to an International Reception in the Lounge 
of the Men's Graduate Center on Tuesday, October 
1st, from 8 :00 to 10 .-00 p.m. Members of the Durham 
Community as well as students, faculty, and adminis- 
tration from the University Community will be there 
to greet them at this function, which is in honor of all 
the students on our campus who have come from other 
countries. 

Further information or transportation to the re- 
ception may be secured by calling the Young Women 's 
Christian Association Office, Extension 2909. 



UNIVERSITY RELIGIOUS COUNCIL RETREAT 

All members of the Duke University Religious 
Council are asked to note that the annual Fall Retreat 
of the Council will be held at Camp New Hope, 
Wednesday, October 2. Cars will leave the Chapel 
steps and the East Campus circle at 3 :30 for all who 
can go out to the Camp for recreation and fellow- 
ship prior to the dinner hour. All others will leave at 
5 :30 P.M., to arrive at Camp in time for dinner at 
6:00 o'clock. Worship and business will follow the 
evening meal. It is expected that the business session 
will adjourn not later than 9 :00 P.M. 



JOINT DUKE-UNC PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM 

At 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 2nd, Dr. 
Richard Setlow of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory 
will deliver the joint Duke-UNC Physics Colloquium 
in Room 114 Physics Building. Dr. Setlow is a phys- 
icist who has been investigating the basic laws 
governing life processes and will speak on "Error- 
correcting Mechanisms at the Molecular Level." 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology will hold a Seminar 
on Thursday, October 3rd, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
M-204 Davison Building. Dr. Aubrey Naylor, of 
the Zoology Department, will speak on ' ' The Possible 
Operation of the Urea Cycle in Plants." 



SLIDE RULE LECTURE 

The second of the annual Slide Rule Lectures will 
be presented in the Engineering Auditorium on 
Thursday, October 3rd, at 7 :00 p.m. Speaking on 
"Multiplication — Division C and D Scales," will be 
Professor F. Thomas Wooten. Since sample problems 
and examples will be studied, it is desirable that those 
attending bring slide rules. Sponsored jointly by 
Tau Beta Pi and The Order of Saint Patrick, the 
lectures are open to the public. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE GRADUATE SEMINAR 

The first meeting of the Political Science Graduate 
Seminar for the current academic year will be held in 
Room 208 Flowers Building on Friday afternoon, 
October 4th, at 3 :00 p.m. The speaker will be Pro- 
fessor Percy H. Partridge of the Australian National 
University. His subject will be "The Role of 
Ideologies in Contemporary Politics." 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Professor C. A. Coulson, F.R.S. from Oxford 
University will speak at the Chemistry Staff Seminar 
on Friday, October 4th, in Room 01 Chemistry Build- 
ing at 4:00 p.m. The subject of Professor Coulson 's 
address will be "Over Crowded Molecules." All in- 
terested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 
UNITED FUND CAMPAIGN KICKOFF 

A Kickoff Meeting for all workers in the general 
University campaign is scheduled for 4:00 p.m., 
Friday, October 4th, in the Engineering Building, 
Lecture Room 125. Workers in this campaign are 
urged to attend in order to receive instructions for the 
campaign. Medical Center United Fund Campaign 
workers will be notified later of their Kickoff Meeting;. 



STUDENT UNION YOUNG ARTISTS SERIES 
PRESENTS RICHARD DYER-BENNET 

The Fine Arts Committee of the Student Union 
has the pleasure of presenting Richard Dyer-Bennet, 
twentieth century minstrel, on Friday, October 4th at 
8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. This is the first pro- 
gram of the Young Artists Series and will be open 
to the public without charge. He will also be speak- 
ing to classes, seminars, and to the Graduate English 
Club on October 3rd. Mr. Dyer-Bennet is a cultured 
artist in the venerable tradition of Homer and the 



[4] 



Elizabethan bards. He accompanies himself on the 
Spanish guitar. 

Mr. Richard Dyer-Bennet's repertoire consists of 
over 600 ballads and folk songs ranging from the song 
of victory sung by the conquering English soldiers 
after the battle of Agincourt to the ballads which 
came into being during World War II and include 
tunes which delighted Queen Elizabeth, haunting sea 
shanteys, and our own American heritage of work 
and play music. 

The New York Times says of him : 

"In addition to being a singer, he is an excellent 
guitarist, and besides being an entertainer, he is a 
composer and musicologist. One thing that sets him 
apart from other folk singers is the range of his 
repertoire. He filled the stage with a gallery of wist- 
ful, touching, humorous characters." 



SPECIAL PHYSICS LECTURE 

Dr. Charles A. Coulson, F.R.S. Rouse Ball Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics and Director of the Mathemati- 
cal Institute, Oxford University will speak on "The 
Present Status of Molecular Structure" in Room 114 
Physics Building at 10:30 a.m., on Saturday, October 
5th. 



DISTINGUISHED GUEST ON CAMPUS 
PROFESSOR CHARLES A. COULSON 

The visit of Professor Charles A. Coulson, Director 
of the Mathematical Institute, Oxford University, to 
the campus of Duke University is an event of signifi- 
cance to the religious and scientific communities. Dr. 
Coulson expects to arrive at the University on Thurs- 
day evening, October 3, and to depart on Tuesday 
morning, October 8. On Friday, October 4, he will 
be lecturing in the Department of Chemistry. In- 
quiries concerning his schedule there may be ad- 
dressed to Professor Pelham Wilder, Jr. On Satur- 
day, Professor Coulson will be having discussions in 
the Department of Physics. Inquiries in this Depart- 
ment may be addressed to Professor Henry A. Fair- 
bank. Sunday morning, October 6, Dr. Coulson will 
deliver the sermon in the Duke Chapel, at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship. Sunday evening, he will 
speak at the Methodist Student Center. Monday noon, 
Dr. Coulson will speak to a faculty luncheon, in the 
Union Ballroom, beginning at 12:30 P.M. Monday 
evening, he will give a public lecture in Page Audi- 
torium, at 8:15. His topic at the faculty luncheon 
will be, "The Idea of a University," and his topic in 
Page Auditorium Monday evening will be, "Science 
and Religion — a Changing Relationship." 

Dr. Coulson holds the following degrees: M.A., 
Ph.D., D.Sc, F.Inst.P., F.R.S.E., F.R.S. He was edu- 
cated at Clifton College and Trinity College, Cam- 
bridge University. He did special research in Mathe- 
matics and Physics in 1931 and 1932. He was a Fellow, 
Trinity College, Cambridge, 1934-38. He was Lecturer 



in Mathematics at (then) University College, Dun- 
dee, 1938-45. He held the I.C.I. Fellowship, Oxford, 
and was College Lecturer in Mathematics at Universi- 
ty College, Oxford, 1945-47. He was Wheatstone Pro- 
fessor of Theoretical Physics in the University of 
London, 1947-52. He has been Rouse Ball Professor 
of Mathematics in the University of Oxford, Fellow 
of Wadham College, Oxford, and Director of the 
Mathematics Institute at Oxford since 1952. Dr. 
Coulson is the author of three scientific textbooks, the 
author of more than 200 research papers, two general 
books and numerous articles on the relations between 
science and religion. One of these books, Science and 
Christian Belief was awarded the Lecomte de Nouy 
Prize. Professor Coulson has held lectureships in the 
United States, Netherlands, Japan, Belgium, Italy, 
Sweden, France, Spain, Austria, Norway. He is an 
Honorary Fellow, Royal Society of Liege; he was 
awarded the Sykes Medal by the University of St. 
Andrews; the Gold Medal by the University of Bo- 
logna; the Medal of Honour by the University of 
Brussels ; he is Honorary Vice-President of the Hos- 
pital Physicists Association; an Honorary Fellow of 
the Italian Cancer Society; a Lay Preacher in the 
Methodist Church ; and he was Vice-President of the 
British Methodist Conference, 1959-60. Dr. Coulson 
does a great deal of lecturing on B.B.C. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
FACULTY CLUB RECEPTION 

HONORING PRESIDENT AND MRS. KNIGHT 
On Sunday, October 6th, the Faculty Club is in- 
viting all members of the Faculty, the Administrative 
and Business staff and their wives or husbands to a 
reception to meet President and Mrs. Knight. It will 
be held in the Library of the Law School between the 
hours of 3 :30 and 6 :30 p.m. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ERASMUS CLUB 



The Erasmus Club, which meets on the first Mon- 
day of each month, will hold its first meeting of the 
year on Monday, October 7th, in the Green Room of 
East Duke Building at 8:00 p.m. Herbert Deinert, 
Assistant Professor of German, will speak on "Franz 
Kafka: The Parable 'Before the Law!." All inter- 
ested faculty members and graduate students are in- 
vited. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
GRADUATE GERMAN EXAMINATION 

The German Examinations for candidates for 
graduate degrees will be given on October 14th-18th. 
Candidates should register in the Graduate School 
Office for this examination not later than October 2nd. 



[5] 



1963-64 ARTISTS SERIES 

Season tickets priced at $8.00, $9.00, and $10.00 are availa- 
ble in Room 202-A Flowers Building. A check payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and should 
be mailed to Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, North Carolina. 
Call 681-0111, Extension 2911, for further information. The 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. on the 
indicated dates. The 1963-64 Series is as follows: 

THE GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER 

Puccini 's ' ' Tosca ' ' Tuesday, December 3 

BACH ARIA GROUP Tuesday, February 4 

William H. Scheide, Director 

Eileen Farrell, Soprano Julius Baker, Flute 

Jan Peerce, Tenor Robert Bloom, Oboe 

Carol Smith, Alto Bernard Greenhouse, Cello 

Norman Farrow, Bass-baritone Maurice Wilk, Violin 
Paul Ulanowsky, Piano 

PRESTI AND LAGOTA, Guitar-Duo Tuesday, March 10 

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Friday, March 20 
William Steinberg, Music Director 

JOHN BROWNING, Pianist Friday, April 17 



OFF-THE-SERIES ATTRACTION 1963-64 

Tuesday, November 19 
The Regimental Band and Massed Pipers of the BLACK 
WATCH (Royal Highland Regiment) with Highland Dancers 
from the Edinburgh Festival. 

The BLACK WATCH performance will take place in the 
Indoor Stadium and reserved seats will be priced at $2.50 and 
$2.00 with a special price of $1.50 and $1.25 to Artists Series 
patrons. Children's tickets are priced at $1.25 and $1.00. 



CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS 

The Chamber Arts Society announces the following 
six concerts for the 1963-64 season : 

Saturday, October 19th— AMADEUS QUARTET 
Saturday, December 7th— JUILLIARD QUARTET 
Saturday, January 11th— HUNGARIAN QUARTET 
Saturday, February 8th— QUARTETTO ITALIANO 
Saturday, March 21st— FINE ARTS QUARTET 
Saturday, April 11th— NEW YORK STRING SEXTET 

These concerts will be held in the Music Room, East 
Duke Building, beginning at 8 :15 p.m. Admission : 
Membership in the Chamber Arts Society is open to all 
persons, and entitles to admission to all concerts. The 
cost of membership will be $12.00. The Committee 
of the Society limits membership to 330 persons, the 
remaining 70 admissions being available to individuals 
who purchase Guest Cards for single concerts at price 
of $2.50. These Guest Cards may be obtained at the 
door of the Music Room on concert evenings from 
7 :30 p.m. to 8 :00 p.m. 



ART LOAN COLLECTION 

The Duke University Art Loan Collection is now 
available for rental in Room 103 Asbury Building, 
Monday through Friday from 9 :00 a.m. through 5 :00 
p.m. The collection contains reproductions of eon- 
temporary art and also some originals. The pictures 
are rented per semester. Rental fee $3.00, to be paid 
in advance. 



WEEK OF 

Oct. 6-12, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 

Oct. 6-12, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, October 6 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. John G. Simpson, 
Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. 1'ni- 
versity Chapel. The Holy Communion. Com- 
munion Meditation : The Reverend Professor 
Charles A. Conlson, Director, Mathematical 
Institute, Oxford University, England. Cele- 
brant : The Reverend Professor James T. 
Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

3:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Club Reception honoring 
President and Mrs. Douglas M. Knight. 
Library of the Law School. 



Monday, October 7 

12:30 p.m. University Religions Council, Faculty 
Luncheon honoring Charles A. Conlson. Union 
Ballroom. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:00 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Green Room, 
East Duke Building. Speaker: Dr. Herbert 
Deinert. 

8:15 p.m. University Religious Council Address: 
Professor Charles A. Conlson. Page Audi- 
torium. 



Tuesday, October 8 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
The Reverend Richard L. Jackson, Congrega- 
tional-Christian Church (United Church of 
Christ). 

3:00 p.m. Campus Club Meeting honoring New- 
comers. Union Ballroom, West Campus. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00 and 7:00 p.m. Student Union Fine Arts Com- 
mittee presents film, "Art in Exhibition." 
Room 204 Flowers Building. (This film from 
Yale University describes visually the correct 
hanging of an art exhibition.) 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 
Card Gymnasium. 

Wednesday, October 9 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
The Reverend David M. Currie, First Presby- 
terian Church. 

11:00 a.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 
Speaker: Dr. Lester A. Welliver. 

:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Walter H. 
Hodge. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Modern Dance Club tryouts. Ark, East 
Campus. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:05 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Sparrows Can't Sing" with 
James Booth and Barbara "Windsor. Joan 
Littlewood's rollicking British comedy. "A 
wild and wacky frolic ! ' ' — Crowther, N. Y. 
Times. "Brilliant almost beyond praise! A 
well-nigh perfect comedy" — The New Yorker. 

Thursday, October 10 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. William Louis Piel. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Physiology Seminar. 
Room M-204, Medical Center. 

4:00 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council. Room 
208 Flowers Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00-6:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:00 p.m. Slide Rule Lecture. Room 125 Engi- 
neering Building. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Speakers Series: Former 
Ambassador Sergio Rojas of Cuba. Page Audi- 
torium. 

Friday, October 11 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. Harmon L. Smith and Mr. J. Patrick 

Heafner. 
1 :00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Bruce David 

Grossman for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology. 

Conference Room, Child Guidance Clinic. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 

Coombs Field. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 

and under must be accompanied by their 

mothers. 
8:00 p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Philosophy Colloquium. 

Professor Virgil Aldrich of Kenyon College. 

213 Caldwell Hall, Chapel Hill. 
8:15 p.m. An Evening with Iain Hamilton. Music 

Room, East Duke Building. 



Saturday, October 12 



2:00 



p.m. Varsity Football : Duke versus University 
of California. Berkeley, California. 
7:05 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. 
Auditorium. "Sparrows Can't Sing' : 
James Booth and Barbara Windsor. 
Littlewood's rollicking British comedy, 
wild and wacky frolic!" — Crowther, N. Y. 
Times. "Brilliant almost beyond praise! A 
well-nigh perfect comedy" — The New Yorker. 



Page 

with 

Joan 

"A 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Sunday, 9:00-9:30 
A.M., Center, Coffee and doughnuts; rides to local 
churches. Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Supper followed by 
worship and seminars being led by Drs. Robert Osborn 
and Thomas Langford. Saturday, October 12, Depart 
from Center at 5 :00 P.M., for a hayride, picnic and 
square dance ; cost, $1.00. 

EPISCOPAL UNIVERSITY CENTER: Sunday 
(Trinity XVII), 9 :30 A.M., Center, Holv Communion 
(Chapel of St. Michael) ; 7:00 P.M., Film Forum at 
the Presbyterian Center ; film — ' ' Patterns. ' ' Monday, 
8:15 P.M., Lecture by Dr. Charles Coulson on "New 
Frontiers in Science and Religion," in Page Audi- 
torium. Participants in "Evenings of Dialogue" are 
asked to attend the lecture and discussion. Wednes- 
day, 7:10 A.M. and 5:30 P.M., Holv Communion 
(Chapel of St. Michael). Friday, 3 :00 P.M., Seminar 
on "Orthodoxy," (Dr. William Bush). 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Sunday, 
6:30 P.M., Green Room, East Didte Building, Sam 
Bradley, Discussion Leader; A tape recording of 
"For Heaven's Sake" will be played. Wednesday, 
7:15 A.M., Communion Service in the Memorial 
Chapel of Duke Chapel. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9 :00 A.M., Center, 
Coffee; 9:30 A.M., discussion of Freshman Forum: 
"The Church in the University"; 5:00 P.M., Center, 
Congregational meal (75c per plate) ; Dr. Charles 
Coulson will speak on "The Christian Layman." 
Wednesday, 7 :00 A.M., Holv Communion, East Duke 
Chapel. Thursday, 9:00 P.M., 102R Men's Graduate 
Center, Graduate Study Group: "Contemporary 
Criticisms of Christianity." 

The Fall Retreat will' be held on October 12, 13, at 
Camp Chesnut Ridge near Efland. Dr. Douglas M. 
Knight and Chaplain Robert Johnson, Director of 
the UNC Wesley Foundation, will lead a discussion on 
"The Idea of a University." Registration is $3.50. 
For information see Frank Peters on West or Kay 
Haire on East, or call the Methodist Center, 286-9230. 
Registration deadline is Monday, October 7. 

UNITED STUDENT FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 5:00 
P.M., A supper meeting at the home of Dr. and Mrs. 
Richard Grant, 2509 Wrightwood Avenue. After 
supper and a short business meeting, the group will 
go to the Presbyterian Student Center for the Prot- 
estant "Film Forum" at 7:00 P.M. Transportation 



[2] 



will leave the Chapel steps, the East Campus circle 
and Hanes House at 4 -.45 P.M. 

WESTMINSTER HOUSE: Sunday, 6:15 P.M., 
Center, Vespers; movie, "Patterns." Coffee and 
pastries will be served after the movie. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The University Service of Holy Communion will 
be held Sunday, October 6th, at 11:00 a.m. in the 
University Chapel as a part of the regular Service 
of Worship. The Reverend Professor Charles A. 
Coulson, Director, Mathematical Institute, Oxford 
University, England, will deliver the Communion 
Meditation, and the Reverend Professor James T. 
Cleland, Dean of the Chapel, will be the Celebrant. 
The Nave Ministers will be the members of the 
Divinity School Student Body. The Chancel Ministers 
will be The Reverend Dr. John J. Rudin, II, Associate 
Professor of Speech and Worship, The Divinity 
School; The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 
Chaplain to the University; The Reverend A. Jack 
Wilson, III, Associate Director of Religious Life; 
and The Reverend John J. Carey, Chaplain to United 
Church of Christ Students. 



FACULTY CLUB RECEPTION 
HONORING PRESIDENT AND MRS. KNIGHT 

On Sunday, October 6th, the Faculty Club is in- 
viting all members of the Faculty, the Administrative 
and Business staff and their wives or husbands to a 
reception to meet President and Mrs. Knight. It will 
be held in the Library of the Law School between the 
hours of 3 :30 and 6 :30 p.m. 



U.R.C. FACULTY LUNCHEON AND 
U.R.C. ADDRESS BY CHARLES A. COULSON 

Professor Charles A. Coulson, Director of the 

Mathematical Institute at Oxford University, is 

scheduled to speak on Monday, October 7th, at two 

meetings sponsored by the Duke University Religious 
p«,™«;i a+ io.qo n wi o fnnni*,. lnypfcrxYn ™n v, 

held in the Union Baiiroom, at which Dr. Coulson 
will speak on the topic, "The Idea of a University." 
This meeting is sponsored by the Faculty Program 
Committee of the Religious Council of which Dr. 
Robert Durden is chairman. 

Dr. Coulson 's second address will be given in 
Page Auditorium, at 8 :15 p.m. He will speak on the 
topic, "Science and Religion — a Changing Relation- 
ship." The evening address and forum in Page Audi- 
torium is sponsored by the Special Observances Com- 
mittee of the Religious Council with Miss Maureen 
Doggett as chairman. All students and faculty, as 
well as the general public, are cordially invited to at- 
tend this lecture. 



ERASMUS CLUB 

The Erasmus Club, which meets on the first Mon- 
day of each month, will hold its first meeting of the 
year on Monday, October 7th, in the Green Room of 
East Duke Building at 8 :00 p.m. Herbert Deinert, 
Assistant Professor of German, will speak on "Franz 
Kafka: The Parable 'Before the Law!," All inter- 
ested faculty members and graduate students are in- 
vited. 



CAMPUS CLUB MEETING 

The Campus Club will honor Newcomers at a 
reception in the Union Ballroom on West Campus at 
3 :00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 8th. The hostess de- 
partments of Geology, Immunology and Psychiatry 
will have Mrs. Sanford I. Cohen as Chairman. 

At this meeting the members will have an oppor- 
tunity to sign for participation in the sixteen study 
groups which include : book study, bridge, cooking, 
language study (French, German and Spanish), golf 
lessons, music study, rug hooking, sketching, Swedish- 
darning and crewel embroidery. For further details 
regarding the study groups Mrs. Karl M. Wilbur or 
Mrs. Frank Ashmore may be called. Dues may also 
be paid and tickets for the November luncheon may 
be purchased. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURE 

An open lecture on ' ' Work of the Judicial Council 
of The Methodist Church" by Dr. Lester A. Welliver, 
President, Judicial Council of The Methodist Church, 
will be presented on Wednesday, October 9th at 11 :00 
a.m. in York Chapel. The public is cordially invited. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botam r Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
October 9th at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building (Auditorium) West Campus. Dr. 
Walter H. Hodge, Program Director for Systematic 
Biology, National Science Foundation, will speak on 
"Facilities for Biological Research in the American 
Tropics." 

Dr. Hodge, a graduate of Clark with the M.A. and 
Ph.D. degrees from Harvard, has taught at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, served with the Bureau of 
Plant Introduction ARS, and most recently was Head 
of the Department of Education and Research, Long- 
wood Gardens. His interests in plant exploration 
have taken him on numerous expeditions to Mexico, 
all parts of Central and South America, to South 
Africa, Australia and Java. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4:00 
p.m. 



MODERN DANCE CLUB TRYOUTS 

Terpsichorean, the Modern Dance Club will hold 
its fall layouts on Wednesday, October 9th at 7:00 



3] 



p.m. in the Ark on East Campus. All freshmen and 
upper classmen who are interested in dance are asked 
to come. Emphasis will be placed upon natural 
ability rather than experience. 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, October 10th, at 4:00 p.m., in Room 
M-204, Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Miles 
Weatherall, of the Department of Pharmacology, 
London Hospital Medical College, London, England, 
will speak on "Aspects of the Mode of Action of 
Digitalis." 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 

The Undergraduate Faculty Council will meet at 
4:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 10th in Room 208 
Flowers Building. 



STUDENT UNION SPEAKERS SERIES 
FORMER AMBASSADOR ROJAS OF CUBA 

The Student Union will present Castro's former 
Cuban Ambassador to Great Britain, Sergio Rojas, 
as the first speaker in the 1963-64 Major Speaker 
Series. Ambassador Rojas will address the Campus 
at 8 :15 p.m. on Thursday, October 10th in Page 
Auditorium on ' ' The Great Communist Conspiracy in 
Cuba and Latin America." All speakers' addresses 
are open to the public without charge. 

Ambassador Rojas was a leader in the Revolution 
that brought Castro to power and was the first 
Ambassador appointed. During his year in Great 
Britain he became disillusioned with the regime's 
switch to the Communist line and returned to his 
country, submitting his resignation in the face of ar- 
rest and possible death. He sought refuge in the 
Argentine Embassy and fled the country. 

Rojas now resides in Barcelona, Spain and, as 
Director of the Cuban Center for Studies of Freedom, 
is active in the movement to see Castro ousted from 
Cuba. During the past two years he has brought his 
story to over 100 colleges and high-level business 
groups in the United States. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Bruce David Gross- 
man for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held 
on Friday, October 11th, at 1 :00 p.m. in the Con- 
ference Room of the Child Guidance Clinic. The 
subject of Mr. Grossman's dissertation is "Parental 
Warmth, Child Dependency and Responsiveness to 
Social Reinforcement." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors Lloyd J. 



Borstelmann, Donald K. Adams, Jack W. Brehm, 
Carl Eisdorfer and Alan C. Kerckhoff. Professor 
Borstelmann will preside. 



JOINT DUKE-UNC PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIUM 

Professor Virgil Aldrich of Kenyon College will 
speak on "An Aspect Theory of Mind" in 213 
Caldwell Hall, Chapel Hill, at 8:00 p.m. on Friday, 
October 11th. All interested members of the Uni- 
versity Community are invited. 



AN EVENING WITH IAIN HAMILTON 

The first in the 1963-64 series entitled "Five 
Evenings With Iain Hamilton" will be presented on 
Friday, October 11th at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building. Mr. Hamilton, Mary Duke 
Biddle Professor of Music, will discuss "Great Non- 
radicals" including Milhaud, Messiaen and Shosta- 
kovich. The series is presented under the auspices of 
the Department of Music and the university com- 
munity and the general public are cordially invited to 
attend. 

The remainder of the series will be as follows: 

November 18 (Monday) 
Luigi Dallapiccola Concert 

February 21 (Friday) 

Gunther Schuller, Mary Duke Biddle guest lecturer. 
Iain Hamilton in a concert presentation by the New York 
Woodwind Quintet and the New York Brass Quintet. 

March 24 (Tuesday) 
Benjamin Britten Concert 

April 21 (Tuesday) 

A Workshop Concert featuring Duke University composers who 
have studied with Mr. Hamilton. 

Each event of the series will take place in the 
Music Room, East Duke Building at 8 :15 p.m. 



1963-64 ARTISTS SERIES 

Season tickets priced at $8.00 and $9.00, are available 
in Room 202-A Flowers Building. A cheek payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and should 
be mailed to Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, North Carolina. 
Call 681-0111, Extension 2911, for further information. The 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. on the 
indicated dates. The 1963-64 Series is as follows: 

THE GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER 

Puccini's "Tosca" Tuesday, December 3 

BACH ARIA GROUP Tuesday, February 4 

William H. Seheide, Director 

Eileen Farrell, Soprano Julius Baker, Flute 

Jan Peerce, Tenor Robert Bloom, Oboe 

Carol Smith, Alto Bernard Greenhouse, Cello 

Norman Farrow, Bass-baritone Maurice Wilk, Yiolin 
Paul Ulanowsky, Piano 

PRESTI AND LAGOYA, Guitar-Duo Tuesday, March 10 

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Friday, March 20 
William Steinberg, Music Director 

JOHN BROWNING, Pianist Friday, April 17 



[4] 



OFF-THE-SERIES ATTRACTION 1963-64 

Tuesday, November 19 

The Regimental Band and Massed Pipers of the BLACK 
WATCH (Royal Highland Regiment) with Highland Dancers 
from the Edinburgh Festival. 



ART EXHIBITIONS 



The Student Union and the Department of Art 
announce two new exhibits now ready for viewing in 
the two art areas on Campus. In the Gallery of the 
Woman's College Library the exhibit, "Sculptors' 
Drawings" from The Joseph H. Hirshhorn Col- 
lection, on loan from The American Federation of 
Arts, may be seen. In the Lounge of the West Union 
Building the exhibit titled, "North Carolina Print- 
makers," on loan from the North Carolina Museum 
of Art, may be seen. 

"Sculptor's Drawings" was assembled by Joseph 
H. Hirshhorn as an adjunct to his collection of sculp- 
ture and called by Curator Abram Lerner "a graphic 
extension of the sculptor's vision." 

"North Carolina's Printmakers" includes thirty 
recent prints by contemporary North Carolina print- 
makers. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CAMPAIGN FOR THE 
DURHAM UNITED FUND 

The 1963 Durham United Fund Campaign is off to 
a flying start. The Duke Campaign is scheduled to 
begin Monday, October 7, 1963. Duke University em- 
ployees, including staff and faculty, will again be 
given the opportunity to contribute through a payroll 
deduction plan. The Durham Community needs your 
help; Duke University needs credit for your contri- 
bution. When you are contacted by a Duke Cam- 
paign worker, pledge generously. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
GRADUATE GERMAN EXAMINATION 

The German Examinations for candidates for 
graduate degrees will be given on October 14th-18th. 
Candidates should register in the Graduate School 
Office for this examination not later than October 2nd. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

SEMINAR 

Professor V. V. Sokolovskiy, Director of the 
Laboratory of Theory of Plasticity of the Institute of 
Mechanics of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, 
Moscow, Russia, will conduct a seminar in the Mechan- 
ical Engineering Department on October 14th. 



Professor Sokolovskiy will lecture on "Complete 
Solutions of Problems of Plastic Flow. ' ' The seminar 
will be held in Room 226 of the Engineering Building, 
at 3 :30 p.m. Graduate students, faculty, and engi- 
neers from area laboratories and industries, will 
attend. 

Professor Sokolovskiy has been active in the area 
of elasticity, plasticity, and soil mechanics, since 1936. 
He has a well-known reputation in engineering and 
scientific circles for his research and publications in 
these fields. He has been Director of the Laboratory 
of Theory of Plasticity since 1959. His visit to this 
country is under the auspices of the National Re- 
search Council, National Academy of Sciences. 



STUDENT UNION PRESENTS 
"A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS" 

The New York Drama Critics' Prize Play, Robert 
Bolt's "A Man for All Seasons" will be presented in 
Page Auditorium on Thursday, October 17th at 8 :15 
p.m. The starring role of Sir Thomas More will be 
played by Robert Harris with a supporting cast in- 
cluding Robert Donley, Dick O'Neill, and Jeff 
Morrow. 

Advance ticket sales are announced by the spon- 
soring group, the Student Union Major Attractions 
Committee: tickets priced at $3.50, $3.00 and $2.50 
are available at the Page Box Office from 2 :00 to 5 :00 
p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, October 
9th, 10th, and 11th and from Monday, October 14th 
through the performance date Thursday, October 17th. 

Reservations may be made by calling extension 
2911 during Box Office hours or by writing Box KM, 
Duke Station. Anyone wishing tickets returned by 
mail is requested to enclose a stamped self addressed 
envelope with their check and request. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 

AMADEUS STRING QUARTET 

The Chamber Arts Society announces the first 
concert of its season to be played by the Amadeus 
String Quartet from London, Saturday, October 19th, 
in the Music Room East Duke Building, at 8 :15 p.m. 
The concert is the sixth to be presented here by the 
Amadeus Quartet, the first being March 1963. The 
musicians are Norbert Brainin and Siegmund Nissel 
(Violins) . Peter Schidlof (Viola) , and Martin Lovett 
(Cello). The program follows : 

Haydn Quartet in G major, Opus 76, No. 1 

Racine Fricker Quartet No. 2 

Beethoven Quartet in A major, Opus 18, No. 5 

Other Chamber Music Concerts scheduled this 
season include: 

December 7 (Saturday) Juilliard Quartet 

January 11 (Saturday) Hungarian Quartet 

February 8 (Saturday) Quartetto Italiano 

March 21 (Saturday) Fine Arts Quartet 

April 11 (Saturday) New York String Sestet 

Membership and Admission: 

A membership card for admission to all concerts 
costs $12.00; the membership card is transferable. 



[5] 



Membership enrollment is limited to 330 persons (60 
memberships remain available at present) ; cards are 
issued in order of application. Program information 
will be sent to any interested persons on request. 

A guest card for a single admission to any one 
concert costs $2.50. About 60 guest cards will be 
available for each concert. They may be obtained at 
the door from 7 :30 to 8 :00 p.m. on concert evenings. 

The Chamber Arts Society is a non-profit organi- 
zation ; membership is open to all persons. For mem- 
bership enrollment send your address and a check to 
Chamber Arts Society, c/o Ernest W. Nelson, Box 
0065 College Station, Durham, North Carolina. 



RECREATIONAL USE OF THE DUKE FOREST 

Members of the University community are re- 
minded that recreational use of the Duke Forest is 
permitted as long as the Forest rules are not violated. 

The Forest rules which are strictly enforced are: 

1. No fires of any kind are permitted on the Forest at any 
time except in the grills at the improved picnic sites. 

2. Cars, motorcycles and motorseooters are not allowed within 
the forest or on forest roads. 

3. All gates must not be blocked at any time. The roads are 
for emergency use as well as normal access in the operation 
of the forest. 



4. Trees, brush and grasses must not be cut, scarred, or in any 
way mutilated as such damage will destroy research projects. 

5. Hunting or shooting of firearms and air rifles are not 
permitted. 

Keys to the improved picnic sites may be checked 
out and the sites reserved at the Duke Forest Office 
in the Biological Sciences Building, West Campus. 
There is no charge for the use of the improved picnic 
sites. 



FACULTY— STAFF GOLF TOURNAMENT 

A Faculty — Staff Golf Tournament, sponsored by 
the Faculty Club of the University, will be held be- 
tween October 19th and November 10th and played on 
the Duke course. The Tournament will be 54-hole 
(three 18-hole rounds) medal play. The first round 
of play is the flight qualifying round aud must be 
completed by October 25. 

All members of the faculty and staff are invited 
to participate. Interested persons should call Coach 
Hagler at the golf course, 2817, or sign up at the golf 
club house. The entry fee is $3.00. There will be 
prizes for winners in all flights. 



WEEK OF 



Oct. 20-26, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Oct. 20-26, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, October 20 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. John G. Simpson, 

Student Carillonnenr. 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of "Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon : 
"A Gospel of Salvation." Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

2:00 p.m. Homecoming Pops Concert : Duke Concert 
Band. Quadrangle of West Campus. 

4:00 p.m. Organ Concert. University Chapel. 
Mildred L. Hendrix, University Organist. 

7:00 p.m. Governor George Wallace, Governor of 
Alabama, sponsored by the National Student 
Association Committee of the Men's Student 
Government Association. Page Auditorium. 

7:00 p.m. Christian Centers Films. Presbyterian 
Student Center. 



Monday, October 21 

1:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Robert Ford 

Welsh for the Ph.D. degree in English. Room 

201 Allen Building. 
4:00 p.m. Linguistics Lecture. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. Speaker: Professor William G. 

Moulton. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium of the 

Biological Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. 

Howard J. Adler. 
5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 



5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. A Commentary on "A Man for All 
Seasons": Dr. Robert A. Van Kluyve. Epis- 
copal Student Center. 

7:30 p.m. Student Union Orientation Meeting. 
Union Ballroom. 

8:15 p.m. CORE Organizational Meeting. Room 
208 Flowers Building. 

Tuesday, October 22 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Professor O. Kelly Ingram. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 

Room 208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:30 p.m. Trinity College Historical Society Meet- 
ing. Men's Graduate Center. Speaker: Dr. 

Colin W. Newberry. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 

Card Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Parapsychology Lecture. Auditorium of 

the Biological Sciences Building. Speaker- Dr 

J. B. Rhine. 

Wednesday, October 23 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 

Professor O. Kelly Ingram. 
4:00 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Fall Elections. Room 
205 Divinitv School. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 291 1. 



4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Weston 
LaBarre. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "The Marriage of Figaro" 
(French). The Comedie Francais in Beau- 
marchais' classic play in Eastman Color. "A 
treasure!" — Weiler, N. Y. Times. "Deserves 
only the superlatives. Filled with social satire 
and comment sparkling with topicality" — 
Crist, N. Y. Herald Tribune. 

7:30 p.m. Student Union Graphic Arts Lecture: 
Helen Thrush. Union Ballroom. 

8:30 p.m. Student Union Coffee following film. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. 

Thursday, October 24 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 
Mr. James W. Lineberger. 

1:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. T. G. 
Rajagopalan for the Ph.D. degree in Bio- 
chemistry. Room 1535 Gerontology Building. 

2:15 p.m. International Relations Lecture. Court- 
room of the Law School. Speaker: Mr. Derek 
Prag. 

3:30 p.m. Public Lecture on Africa: Dr. C. "W. 
Newberry. Room 229 Allen Building. 

3:45 p.m. U. S. UNICEF Director Lecture: C. 
Lloyd Bailey. Room 201 Flowers Building. 

4:00 p.m. Meeting of the University Faculty. 
Page Auditorium. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology Seminar. Room M-204 Medi- 
cal Center. Dr. "Walter Bonner. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :30-9 :45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, October 25 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Holy Communion. Professor O. K. Ingram, 

Celebrant. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 

Coomb6 Field. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 

and under must be accompanied by their 

mothers. 



8:00 p.m. Duke Psychiatric Residents' Group 
Lecture : Dr. Walter Bonime. Room 2031 Duke 
Hospital. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "The 
Pleasure of His Company." Page Auditorium. 

Saturday, October 26 

10:10 a.m. Duke Psychiatric Residents' Group 
Lecture : Dr. Walter Bonime. Room D3008, 
VA Hospital. 
2:00 p.m. Varsity Football: Duke versus N. C. 
State College. Raleigh, N. C. 
N.B. — Quadrangle Pictures will be closed to 
accommodate the Duke Players Performance. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "The 
Pleasure of His Company." Page Auditorium. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Sunday, 9:30 A.M., 
Center, Coffee and doughnuts. Tuesday, Noon, Lunch 
will be served at the Center followed by a discussion 
led by Dr. Hugh Hall of the Duke Dept. of Political 
Science, on the general theme of "Recent Concerns in 
My Discipline and Implications for Christian Re- 
sponsibility." Cost of lunch is $1.00. Friday, 6:15 
P.M., Supper followed by worship and seminars. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL UNIVERSITY CENTER: Sunday, 
9:30 A.M., Holy Communion; 6:15 P.M., Evensong; 
7:00 P.M., Film Forum at the Presbvterian Student 
Center— "Assembly Line" and "The R«d Balloon." 
Monday, 7 :00 P.M., Evenings of Dialogue with a com- 
mentarv on "A Man for All Seasons," bv Dr. Robert 
Van Kluyve. Wednesday, 7 :10 A.M. and 5 :30 P.M., 
Holy Communion. Friday, 3 :00 P.M., Seminar on 
Orthodoxy (Dr. William Bush). 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Sunday, 
6:30 P.M., Green Room, East Duke Building, The 
Reverend J. Sehoneberg Setzer will speak on "The 
Modern Christian's Attitude Toward Miracles." 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9:00 A.M., Center, 
Freshman Forum, snack breakfast and discussion of 
"The Meaning of Worship"; 6:00 P.M., Evening 
Prayer. Tuesday, 7:00 P.M., Seminar— "The Mean- 
ing of Freedom." Wednesday, 7 :00 A.M., East Duke 
Chapel, Holy Communion (Rides will leave the en- 
trance of the main student parking lot on West at 
6 :55 A.M. ) . Thursday, 9 :00 P.M., Graduate Seminar, 
"Contemporary Criticisms of Christianity," Men's 
Graduate Center. 

UNITED STUDENT FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 5:30 
P.M., Meet at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Fair- 
bank, 1515 Pinecrest Road. After supper and a short 
business meeting the group will go to the Presbyterian 
Student Center for the Film Forum. Transportation 
will leave from the Chapel, East Campus circle and 
Hanes House at 5 :15 P.M. 

WESTMINSTER HOUSE: Sunday, 6:15 P.M., 
Center, Vespers ; 7 :00 P.M., Film Forum. 



[2] 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean 
of the Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, 
October 20th in the University ChapeL His subject 
will be, "A Gospel of Salvation." The order of 
worship follows: 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University. 
Lector: Dr. Douglas M. Knight, President of the University. 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Prelude and Fugue in G minor. 

Buxtehude 
Aria Flor Peeters 

Call to Worship — "The Lord Is in His Holy Temple" Alain 
Hymn — "Before Jehovah's Awe-full Throne" 

Melody from Genevan Psalter 
The Prayer of Adoration 
The Lord 's Prayer 

Anthem — ' ' Christe, Adoramus Te ' ' Claudio Monteverde 

Scripture Lesson — Luke 19:1-10 

Hymn — ' ' He Leadeth Me ' ' William B. Bradbury 

Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayer of Confession, Thanksgiving, Intercession, 

Petition and Dedication 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem— "Lift Up Your Heads, O Ye Gates" 

from The Messiah George Handel 

Response — The Doxology 

Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — "A Gospel of Salvation" 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Dresden Amen" Dresden 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Fantasia in G Bach 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, October 27th, is the Reverend Dr. Chester 
A. Pennington, Minister of Hennepin Avenue Meth- 
odist Church, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 



ORGAN RECITAL 



The first organ recital of the academic year will be 
presented by Mildred L. Hendrix, University Organ- 
ist, on Sunday, October 20th, at 4:00 p.m. in the 
University Chapel. The public is extended a cordial 
invitation to attend. 

Mrs. Hendrix' program, consisting of music by 
French composers, was prepared during the past 
summer while she studied at the International 
Academy in Nice, France with Pierre Cochereau, the 
world famous organist of Notre Dame Cathedral. 

The program follows: 

Mass for the Parishes Francois Couperin, le Grand 

(1668-1733) 
Gloria. Dialogue sur les trompettess . . . 
Kyrie. Reeit de Chromhorne. 
Benedictus. Chromhorne en Taille. 
Chorale in E Major Cesar Franek 

(1822-1890) 
Divertissement Louis Vierne 

(1870-1939) 
Le Banquet Celeste Olivier Messiane 

(1908- ) 
Trois Pieces Jehan Alain 

(1911-1940) 
Variations sur un theme de Clement Jannequin 
Le Jardin Suspendu 
Litanies 



HOMECOMING POPS CONCERT ON 
WEST QUADRANGLE 

The Duke University Concert Band, under the 
direction of Paul Bryan, will present a Homecoming 
Pops Concert on Sunday afternoon, October 20th 
at 2:00 P.M. on West Campus in the Quadrangle 
under the clock. 

This concert which has usually been given in the 
Sarah P. Duke Gardens has been moved to the campus, 
at the request of the Men's Student Government 
Association so that it can be more readily available to 
the class of 1967 for whom it is especially presented. 
Continuing the informality of past outdoor concerts, 
the public is invited to attend and bring blankets for 
seating on the grass. Refreshments will be served. 
In case of rain the concert will be presented in Page 
Auditorium and the reception will be in the foyer 
of the auditorium. A program of music "easy on the 
earballs ' ' is as follows : 

Boston Commandery March T. M. Carter 

Overture to the Opera Semiramide G. Rossini 

Valzer Campestre from Suite Siciliana G. Marinuzzi 

"Care Selve" from the Opera Atalanta G. F. Handel 

March "Cornfed" P. Bryan 

' ' Autumn in New York ' ' Vernon Duke 

Two Dances Teriz Tucci 

La Bamba de Vera Cruz ("Mexican Dance") 

Sonnenbichl (No. 1 of the Choral Suite 

"From the Bavarian Highlands") Edward Elgar, Op. 27 
Victory at Sea, Symphonic Scenario Richard Rodgers 



CHRISTIAN CENTERS FILMS }- I ' ; ^ 
The Campus Christian Centers invite the Univer- 
sity Community to a showing of two short films, 
"Assembly Line" and "The Red Balloon," both of 
which deal with the problem of finding one's identity 
as a person. There is no admission charge, and coffee 
and discussion will follow. The films will be shown 
at the Presbyterian Student Center on Alexander 
Street at 7 :00 p.m., Sunday, October 20th. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Robert Ford Welsh 
for the Ph.D. degree in English will be held on Mon- 
day, October 21st at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 (Con- 
ference Board Room) Allen Building. The subject 
of Mr. Welsh's dissertation is "The Printing of the 
Early Editions of Marlowe's Plays: Tamburlaine 
(1590), The Massacre at Paris (1592), Edward II 
(1594), Dido (1594), Doctor Faustus (1604, 1616),. 
The Jew of Malta (1633)." The committee to con- 
duct the examination consists of Professors .George 
W. Williams, John L. Lievsay, Charles E. Ward, 
Holger Nygard and Ernest Nelson. Professor Wil- 
liams will preside. 



LINGUISTICS LECTURE 

Professor William G. Moulton of the Program 
in Linguistics, Princeton University, will present a 
lecture on ' ' How the Linguist Looks at Language ' ' on 
Tuesday, October 22nd at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. Professor Moulton is appearing 



[3] 



under the auspices of the Interdepartmental Com- 
mittee on Linguistics. The lecture is open to the 
public. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, October 21st in the Auditorium of 
the Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Dr. 
Howard J. Adler, Oak Kidge National Laboratory, 
Oak Ridge, Tennessee will speak on ' ' Genetic Analysis 
of Radiation Response in Bacteria." Coffee and tea 
will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



A COMMENTARY ON 
"A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS" 

On Monday, October 21st at 7 :00 p.m. there will 
be a commentary on "A Man For All Seasons" by Dr. 
Robert A. Van Kluyve, a member of the English De- 
partment. The meeting will be held at the Episcopal 
University Center on Alexander Avenue (off Myrtle 
Drive). All interested persons are cordially invited 
to participate. 



CORE ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING 

Faculty and students interested in the organizing 
of a CORE Chapter and in discussing a proposed 
constitution for the Chapter are invited to meet at 
8:15 p.m. on Monday, October 21st, in Room 208 
Flowers Building. 



TRINITY COLLEGE 
HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING 
The first dinner meeting of the Trinity College 
Historical Society for 1963-64 will be held on Tues- 
day, October 22nd in the private dining room of the 
Men's Graduate Center. At 5:30 p.m. a special 
cafeteria line will commence serving members of the 
Society, at a cost of $1.25 per person. New history 
graduate students are especially welcome. Wives are 
cordially invited to attend. Dr. Colin W. Newbury 
of Oxford University will address the Society on 
"The West African Commonwealth: Great Britain 
and the New States." 



AFRICA: PUBLIC LECTURES 

Dr. C. W. Newbury, a member of the Institute of 
Commonwealth Studies, Oxford, will be in residence 
at Duke October 16th to November 15th. Under the 
auspices of the Committee on the Ford Common- 
wealth — International Studies Grant, he will give 
three lectures on the general subject of The West 
African Commonwealth. These will be given as 
follows : 

1. "Great Britain and the New States," on Tuesday, 
October 22nd at 5:30 p.m. in the Men's Graduate Center, be- 
fore a meeting of the Trinity College Historical Society. Mr. 
Antony Wood will preside. 

2. "Nationalism and the Transfer of Power," on Thurs- 
day, October 24th at 3:30 p.m. in Boom 229 Allen Building. 
Professor C. Manning Clark will preside. 

3. "Current Perspectives," on Tuesday, October 29th at 



2:00 p.m. in Boom 109 Carr Building. (Woman's College). 
Professor J. Harris Proctor will preside. 

Dr. Newbury took his M.A. degree at Otago Uni- 
versity and his Ph.D. at Australian National Uni- 
versity. He has taught at University College, Ibadan. 
He is the author of The Western Slave Coast and its 
Rulers and editor of John Davies, History of the 
Tahitian Mission, 1799-1830, for the Hakluyt Society. 



PARAPSYCHOLOGY LECTURE 

Dr. J. B. Rhine, Director of the Parapsychology 
Laboratory, will speak on "Parapsychology Today — 
Here and Abroad ' ' on Tuesday evening, October 22nd 
at 8 :15 p.m. The lecture will be given in the Audi- 
torium of the Biological Sciences Building. The 
public is cordially invited to attend. 



PHI BETA KAPPA FALL ELECTIONS 

The fall meeting of Phi Beta Kappa will be held 
on Wednesday, October 23rd at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 
205 Divinity School. Undergraduate elections will be 
the main business of the meeting. All staff and 
faculty members of the Society are eligible to vote. 
Those not already on the roll should call the Secretary, 
Professor W. F. Stinespring, 105 Divinitv School, 
Extension 3234. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
October 23rd at 4 :15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building (Auditorium) West Campus. Dr. 
Weston LaBarre, Professor of Anthropology will 
speak on "The Ethnobotany and Ethnography of 
Lophophora williamsii — Mescal — Peyote. ' ' 

Mescal or Peyote has long been used by American 
Indians and others for various purposes including 
certain ceremonial rites which, as a part of his field 
studies, Dr. LaBarre has been privileged to observe. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 



STUDENT UNION GRAPHIC ARTS LECTURE 

The Student Union Fine Arts Committee will pre- 
sent Miss Helen Thrush acting Head of the Art De- 
partment, The University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro, on Wednesday, October 23 in a lecture- 
demonstration on the Graphic Arts. The talk will be 
given in the Union Ballroom of the West Union Build- 
ing at 7 :30 p.m. and is open to the public without 
charge. 

The evening program will begin with the lecture- 
demonstration, and will conclude with an informal re- 
ception. At this time the group will have the oppor- 
tunity of viewing the exhibit, "North Carolina 
Printmakers," in which Miss Thrush is one of the 
exhibitors. 

Helen Thrush studied at the Pennsylvania Museum 
and School of Industrial Art, taking her B.F.A. at 
the University of Pennsylvania, and her M.A. at 
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Her study of 
Graphics includes the Fountainebleau School of Fine 



[4] 



Arts, France, the Art Students League, New York, 
Hayter's Atelier 17, and Pratt-Contemporaries, 
Graphic Art Center. 

Listed in Who's Who of American Women, Miss 
Thrush has been the winner of many awards and has 
exhibited widely in National and International Ex- 
hibitions, including The Pennsylvania Academy of 
Fine Arts, the University of Minnesota, the Brooklyn 
Museum, the Print Club of Albany, the Society of 
American Graphic Arts and the American Federation 
of Arts. 



U. S. UNICEF DIRECTOR LECTURE 
The Duke student chapter of the United Nations 
will hold an open seminar on Thursday, October 24th, 
in Room 201 Flowers Building at 3 :45 p.m. to hear C. 
Lloyd Bailey, Executive Director of the U. S. Com- 
mittee of UNICEF. Mr. Bailey's duties take him to 
35 countries and he brings a wealth of information in 
regard to the distribution of food and clothing to the 
world's needy children. He will also discuss the work 
of fund raising for this organization. The meeting is 
open to all interested persons. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. T. G. Rajagopalan 
for the Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry will be held on 
Thursday, October 24th at 1:30 p.m. in Room 1535, 
Gerontology Building. The subject of Mr. Rajago- 
palan 's dissertation is "Studies on Bovine Fructose- 
diphosphatase. " The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors William L. Byrne, 
Philip Handler, Robert L. Hill, Kenneth S. McCarty 
and Charles K. Bradsher. Professor Byrne will pre- 
side. 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS LECTURE 

The Committee on International Relations is 
pleased to announce the visit of the noted economist 
and journalist Mr. Derek Prag to the Campus on 
October 24th. Mr. Prag is a former correspondent and 
editor for Reuters News Agency in London, Brussels, 
and Madrid, specializing in international and Euro- 
pean organizations, a member of the Information 
Service of the European Coal and Steel Community, 
Luxembourg, since 1955 an official of the European 
Communities (Common Market, Coal and Steel Com- 
munity, Euratom), and since 1960 Chief of Publica- 
tions, Press and Information Service of the European 
Communities. He will speak on the topic : ' ' European 
Unity and Atlantic Partnership. Where From 
Here?" The lecture will take place on Thursday, 
October 24th at 2:15 p.m. in the Courtroom (Room 
211) of the Law School. The University Community 
is cordially invited to attend. 

Following the lecture and discussion, and by ar- 
rangement with the International Law Society of the 
Duke Law School, Mr. Prag will be available in the 



Conference Room of the Law School (Room 220) from 
4 :00-5 :30 p.m. for further informal discussion with 
interested faculty and students. Refreshments will 
be served during the course of this session. 



MEETING OF THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

The University Faculty will meet in Page Audi- 
torium on Thursday, October 24, at 4:00 p.m. The 
agenda will include a report from President Knight. 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Department of Physiology will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, October 24th, at 4 :00 p.m. in Room M- 
204 Medical Center. Dr. Walter Bonner, Department 
of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry, University 
of Pennsylvania, will be the speaker. 



PSYCHIATRIC LECTURE 

The Duke Psychiatric Residents' Group will pre- 
sent guest lecturer, Dr. Walter Bonime, on Friday 
and Saturday, October 25th and 26th. Dr. Bonime 
will speak on "Clinical Approaches to Dreams Part 
I" on Friday at 8:00 p.m. in Room 2031 Duke Hos- 
pital, and on Saturday at 10 :00 a.m., in Room D 3008 
VA Hospital, he will continue with "Clinical Ap- 
proaches to Dreams Part II." 



DUKE PLAYERS PRESENT 
"THE PLEASURE OF HIS COMPANY" 

Duke Players will present a comedy from the 
1958-59 Broadway season, "The Pleasure of His 
Company, " by Samuel Taylor, which starred Cornelia 
Otis Skinner. Kenneth Reardon is directing the 
Players' production with Victor Michalak as technical 
director. Performances will be on Friday and Satur- 
day, October 25th and 26th in Page Auditorium at 
8:15 p.m. Page Box Office will be open for reserva- 
tions and ticket sales beginning Monday, October 21st. 
Box office hours will be Monday and Wednesday from 
2 :00 to 5 :00 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday from 3 :30 
to 5 :00 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 2 :00 p.m. 
until curtain time. Tickets are priced at $1.25. For 
reservations call Extension 2911. 

This bright and sparkling comedy tells the story 
of a world traveler and sportsman who returns to 
America to give his daughter, whom he has not seen 
in years, in marriage. He all but takes over the home 
of his first wife, Kate, utterly charms his long-lost 
daughter Jessica, and succeeds in making Jessica's 
young man, Roger, feel like a boor in contrast. The 
conflict which results makes for an unusual comic 
situation and laugh-provoking dialogue. 



ARCHIVE SUBSCRIPTIONS 
The Archive, Duke's literary magazine, is now 
offering subscription rates of $1.50 a year (four 
issues) to anyone who wishes to subscribe. Please 
send requests to The Archive, Box 4665, Duke Station. 
All checks should be made payable to The Archive. 



[5] 



FACULTY-STAFF GOLF TOURNAMENT 

A Faculty-Staff Golf Tournament, sponsored by 
the Faculty Club of the University, will be held be- 
tween October 19 and November 10 and played on 
the Duke course. The Tournament will be 51-hole 
(three 18-hole rounds) medal play. The first round of 
play is the flight qualifying round and must be com- 
pleted by October 25. The entry fee is $3.00. There 
will be prizes for winners in all the flights. 

All members of the faculty and staff are invited to 
participate. Interested persons who desire additional 
information may call Coach Hagler at the golf course, 
2817, or see one of the committee members listed below. 
Persons who plan to enter may do so at the golf club 
house. 

Members of the arrangements committee : David 
Davies, Charles H. Frenzel, Coach E. P. Hagler, Paul 
Meyer, Ransom R. Patrick, and J. H. Phillips, Chair- 
man. 



CALENDAR CHANGE 

The first program in the Music Department 
Faculty Series, a recital by Ronald Fishbaugh, 
pianist, originally scheduled for Tuesday evening, 
October 22nd, has been postponed to a date to be 
announced later in the year. 



ART EXHIBITIONS 

The Student Union and the Department of Art 
announce two new exhibits now ready for viewing in 
the two art areas on Campus. In the Gallery of the 
Woman's College Library the exhibit, "Sculptors' 
Drawings" from The Joseph H. Hirshhorn Col- 
lection, on loan from The American Federation of 



Arts, may be seen. In the Lounge of the West Union 
Building the exhibit titled, "North Carolina Print- 
makers," on loan from the North Carolina Museum 
of Art, may be seen. 

"Sculptor's Drawings" was assembled by Joseph 
H. Hirshhorn as an adjunct to his collection of sculp- 
ture and called by Curator Abram Lerner ' ' a graphic 
extension of the sculptor's vision." 

"North Carolina's Printmakers" includes thirty 
recent prints by contemporary North Carolina print- 
makers. 



1963-64 ARTISTS SERIES 

Season tickets priced at $8.00, $9.00, and $10.00 are availa- 
ble in Boom 202-A Flowers Building. A check payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and should 
be mailed to Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, North Carolina. 
Call 681-0111, Extension 2911, for further information. The 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. on the 
indicated dates. The 1963-64 Series is as follows: 

THE GOLDOVSKY GEAND OPERA THEATER 

Puccini's "Tosca" Tuesday, December 3 

BACH ARIA GROUP Tuesday, February 4 

William H. Scheide, Director 
Eileen Farrell, Soprano Julius Baker, Flute 

Jan Peeree, Tenor Robert Bloom, Oboe 

Carol Smith, Alto Bernard Greenhouse, Cello 

Norman Farrow, Bass-baritone Maurice Wilk, Violin 
Paul Ulanowsky, Piano 



PRESTI AND LAGOYA, Guitar-Duo 



Tuesday, March 10 



PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Friday, March 20 
William Steinberg, Music Director 



JOHN BROWNING, Pianist 



Friday, April 17 



OFF-THE-SERIES ATTRACTION 1963-64 

Tuesday, November 19 

The Regimental Band and Massed Pipers of the BLACK 
WATCH (Royal Highland Regiment) with Highland Dancers 
from the Edinburgh Festival. 



WEEK OF 

Oct. 27-Nov. 2, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 

Oct. 27-Nov. 2, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, October 27 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. John G. Simpson, 
Student Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 
Chapel. Preacher: Dr. Chester A. Pennington, 
Minister, Hennepin Avenue Methodist Church, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota. Sermon : ' ' The Truth 
Which Makes You Free." Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 



Monday, October 28 

2:00 p.m. Registration. Christian Convocation, 
North Carolina Pastors' School, and the James 
A. Gray Lectures. Flowers Building Lounge. 
(See special notice.) 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Speaker: Sir 
Stanton Hicks. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty and graduate students volley- 
ball. Indoor Stadium. 



Tuesday, October 29 

12 :30-l :30 p.m. Faculty and graduate students volley- 
ball. Indoor Stadium. 
2:00 p.m. Africa: Public Lecture. Room 109 Carr 
Building. Speaker: Dr. C. W. Newbury. 



3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 
Card Gymnasium. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Madrigal Singers' Fall Concert. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

Wednesday, October 30 

3:30 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Auditorium of 
Building 9. Speakers: Professor Donald K. 
Adams, Department of Psychology and Pro- 
fessor Emeritus Robert H. Thouless, Cambridge 
University, England. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Ralph 
Slatyer. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Audi- 
torium. "The Island" .(Japanese). "A 
masterpiece!" — The New Yorker. "Full of 
visual wonders!" — Life Magazine. "One of 
the most extraordinary films I can recall!" — 
Zunser, Cue Magazine. In Cinemascope. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



8:00 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Koom 116 
Chemistry Building. Speaker: Dr. Henry 
Eyring. 



Thursday, October 31 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Mr. Richard E. Prince. 
12:30 p.m. Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Ralph 
Slatyer. 
12 :30-l :30 p.m. Faculty and graduate students volley- 
ball. Indoor Stadium. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology Seminar. Room M-204 Medi- 
cal Center. Speaker: Dr. William P. Wilson. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5 :00-6 :00 p.m. Faculty and graduate students volley- 
ball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:00 p.m. Slide Rule Lecture. Room 125 Engi- 
neering Building. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

8:15 p.m. S. U. Young Artists Series: The Alvin 
Ailey Dance Theater. Page Auditorium. 

Friday, November 1 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Harmon L. Smith and Mr. Hollis R. Wil- 
liams, Jr. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 

Coombs Field. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:00 p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Philosophy Colloquium. 
Room 213 Caldwell Hall, Chapel Hill. N. C. 
Speaker: Professor Colin M. Turbayne. 

Saturday, November 2 

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. North Carolina Association of 
High School Future Teacher Clubs. Page 
Auditorium. 

2:00 p.m. Varsity Football: Duke versus Georgia 
Tech. Atlanta, Ga. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "The Island" (Japanese). "A 
masterpiece!" — The New Yorker. "Full of 
visual wonders!" — Life Magazine. "One of 
the most extraordinary films I can recall!" — 
Zunser, Cue Magazine. In Cinemascope. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Friday, 6:15 P.M., 
Baptist Student Center, Supper followed by worship 
and forum : ' ' The College Student and Basic Moral 
Decisions." November 1-3, Greensboro, N. C, North 
Carolina Baptist Student Union Convention. Speakers 
will be Dr. Howard Moody, Pastor of Judson Memo- 
rial Church of Greenwich Village in New York, and 
Dr. William Hull, Professor of New Testament at 
Southern Baptist Seminary. The theme is "Freedom 
Through Bondage." The cost is $2.00, plus cost of 
two meals. Register at the Baptist Student Center. 

EPISCOPAL UNIVERSITY CENTER: Sunday, 
9 :30 A.M., Chapel of St. Michael, Holy Communion ; 
7 :00 P.M., Film Forum at the Presbyterian Student 
Center, "Cry the Beloved Country."' Monday, 7:10 
A.M. and 5:30 P.M., Holy Communion (Feast of 
SS. Simon and Jude) ; 7 :00 P.M., Center, Evenings 
of Dialogue: "A Preview of Symposium"; leaders — 
Bill Nichols and Mariann Sanders. Wednesday, 7 :10 
A.M. and 5 :30 P.M., Center, Holv Communion. Fri- 
day, 7:10 A.M. and 5:30 P.M., Center, Holy Com- 
munion (All Saints Day) ; 6 :30 P.M., Center, All 
Saints Day Dinner. All members of the University 
Community are invited ; 4 :00 P.M., Seminar on 
"Christianity and Modern Man." 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Sunday, 
4:00 P.M., Duke Memorial Chapel, Installation Serv- 
ice for the Reverend William R. Patton, Chaplain to 
Lutheran Students at Duke University — to be followed 
by a dutch-treat supper in the Italian Room. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9 :00 A.M., Center, 
Freshman Forum (snack breakfast and discussion) ; 
discussion leader— Dr. W. D. White; 6:00 P.M., 
Center, Evening Prayer; 4:00 P.M., Center, The full 
council of the Center will meet; 7:00 P.M., Presby- 
terian Student Center, Film Forum, sponsored by the 
various Campus Christian Centers, "Cry the Beloved 
Country," coffee and discussion will follow. Tuesday, 
7:00 PJL, Center, Seminar: "The Meaning of Free- 
dom." Wednesday, 7:00 A.M., East Duke Chapel, 
Holy Communion. Thursday, 9:00 P.M.. Graduate 
Center, Seminar: " Contemporary Criticisms of 
Christianity." 

WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 6:15 
P.M., Center. Vespers; 7:00 P.M., Center, Film 
Forum: "Cry the Beloved Country" — Discussion 
moderated by Dr. Waldo Beach after the showing of 
film. 

YWC A : Thursday, 8 :00 P.M., East Duke Music Room, 
YWCA Open Forum Series. Mr. Floyd McKissick, 
National Chairman of CORE will speak on "A United 
House." 

UNITED STUDENT FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 5:30 
P.M., Meet at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Hans Hiller- 
brand, 2729 Sevier Street. After supper and a short 
business meeting the group will go to the Presby- 
terian Student Center for the Film Forum. Transpor- 
tation will leave from the Chapel, East Campus circle 
and Hanes House at 5 :15 P.M. 



[2] 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Chester A. Pennington, Minister, 
Hennepin Avenue Methodist Church, Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, October 
27th in the University Chapel. His subject will be, 
"The Truth Which Makes You Free." The order of 
worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, 

Dean of the Chapel. 
Lector: Miss Nanei Weldon, President, Methodist Student 

Fellowship. 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Concerto No. 1 in G major 

Allegro, Adagio, Allegro J. S. Bach 

Choral Adoration — ' ' The Lord Is in His Holy Temple ' ' 

Calvin W. Laufer 
Hymn — "Fairest Lord Jesus" From Schlesischen Yollcslieder 

Arr. by Richard S. Willis 
The Prayer of Adoration 
The Lord's Prayer 

Anthem — "Let My Prayer Come Up" Henry Pur cell 

Scripture Lesson — John 1:1-18 

Hymn — "Make Me A Captive Lord" George TV. Martin 

Arr. by Arthur S. Sullivan 
Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayer of Confession, Thanksgiving, Intercession, 

Petition, and Dedication 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "The Last Words of David" Randall Thompson 

Response — The Doxology 

Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — "The Truth Which Makes You Free" 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — ' ' Dresden Amen ' ' Dresden 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Toccata Gigout 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, November 3rd, is the Reverend Dr. Robert 
W. Spike, of New York City. 



CHRISTIAN CONVOCATION 

NORTH CAROLINA PASTORS' SCHOOL 

JAMES A. GRAY LECTURES 

The Christian Convocation and North Carolina 
Pastors' School together with the James A. Gray 
Lectures will be held on the campus from Monday, 
October 28 through Wednesday, October 30. 

The James A. Gray Lecturer this year will be Dr. 
Joseph Sittler, Professor of Systematic Theology at 
the University of Chicago. The general theme is 
Reflections on Nature and Grace. The Convocation 
Preacher is Dr. Chester A. Pennington, Senior 
Minister to Hennepin Avenue Methodist Church, 
Minneapolis, whose sermons will deal with the topic : 
Can the Church Be Renewed? 

Pastors' School Lecturer on Revision of the 
Hymnal and Ritual is Bishop Nolan B. Harmon of the 
Western North Carolina and North Alabama Meth- 
odist Conferences. Pastors' School Lecturer on 
Ecumenical Christianity is Bishop Fred Pierce Corson 
of the Philadelphia Area of the Methodist Church. 

The Alumni Lecturer is Dr. A. Purnell Bailey, 



Superintendent of the Richmond District of The 
Methodist Church. 

SCHEDULE 

Monday, October 28 
2:00 p.m. — Registration. Flowers Building Lounge. 
4:00 p.m. — Pastors' School Lecture on the Revision of the 

Hymnal and Ritual. ' ' Consciences Murmuring Faiths 

Under Forms. ' ' Bishop Harmon. Page Auditorium. 
5:30 p.m. — Dinner for Speakers, Staff, and Board of 

Managers. Old Trinity Room. 
7:15 p.m. — First Gray Lecture. "The Traditional Setting 

of the Doctrine. ' ' Dr. Sittler. Page Auditorium. 
8:30 p.m. — First Convocation Sermon. "The Courage to 

Accept God 's Gift. ' ' Dr. Pennington. University 

Chapel. 
9:30 p.m. — Late Registration. Flowers Building Lounge. 

Reception for Alumni and Friends. Flowers Building 

Lounge. 

Tuesday, October 29 

8:00 a.m. — Holy Communion. Bishop Harmon, Celebrant. 
York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. — First Pastors' School Lecture on Ecumenical 
Christianity. ' ' Ecumenicity and the Second Vatieal 
Council. ' ' Bishop Corson. Page Auditorium. 
10:10 a.m. — Second Gray Lecture. " Two New Facts and Their 
Demand Upon the Doctrine. ' ' Dr. Sittler. A discussion 
period will follow. Page Auditorium. 
12:00 noon — Alumni Lecture. Dr. Bailey. Page Auditorium. 

1:00 p.m. — Alumni Association Luncheon. The Reverend Paul 
Carruth, President. Union Ballroom. 

3:00 to 4:00 p.m. — Tea for Ministers' Wives. Faculty 
Lounge, Union Building. 

4:00 p.m. — Second Pastors' School Lecture on Ecumenical 
Christianity. ' ' Ecumenicity and the World Confessional 
Bodies." Bishop Corson. Page Auditorium. 

7 : 15 p.m. — Third Gray Lecture. ' ' The Doctrine in the 
Scope of the Biblical Witness to Christ." Dr. Sittler. 
Page Auditorium. 

8:30 p.m. — Second Convocation Sermon. "Going on to Per- 
fection. ' ' Dr. Pennington. University Chapel. 

Wednesday, October 30 
8:00 a.m. — Holy Communion. Prof. W. Arthur Kale, Cele- 
brant. York Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. — Fourth Gray Lecture. "The Substance of Con- 
temporary Reflection About the Doctrine." Dr. Sittler. 
A discussion period will follow. Page Auditorium. 
11:00 a.m. — Third Convocation Sermon. "The Community of 

the Spirit. ' ' Dr. Pennington. University Chapel. 
12:15 p.m. — Luncheon Meeting. Board of Managers of the 
North Carolina Pastors ' School. Old Trinity Room. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 



The Zoology Department will hold its weekly semi- 
nar on Monday, October 28th at 4 :15 p.m. in the Audi- 
torium of the Biological Sciences Building. Sir 
Stanton Hicks, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 
Australia will speak on "Climatic Adaptation and 
Drug Habituation of the Australian Aborigine." 
Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4:00 p.m. 



RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING COURSE 

A three and one half hour Radiological Monitoring 
Course will be held on Monday, October 28th through 
Thursday, October 31st. The purpose of the course is 
to train persons in the operation and use of those 
radiological instruments which have been placed in 
public fallout shelters under the National Shelter 



[3] 



Stocking Program. The course is being presented 
under the auspices of the Duke University Fallout 
Preparedness Committee and is open to all members 
of the University Community. Interested persons 
may obtain a schedule and registration blank by call- 
ing Extension 2194. 



DUKE MADRIGAL SINGERS' FALL CONCERT 

On Tuesday evening, October 29th at 8 :15 p.m. 
in the Music Room of East Duke Building, the Music 
Department will present the Duke Madrigal Singers 
in their annual fall concert. Singing English and 
Spanish music from the Renaissance and a German 
Missa Brevis from the Baroque period, the Madrigal 
Singers are pleased also to present Marjorie Randolph, 
self-accompanied singer and student of John Hanks 
of the Music Department, in a special group of songs 
with the guitar. The Duke Recorders Group assisted 
by other instrumentalists will also participate in the 
program. Directed by Eugenia Saville of the Music 
Department, the program is free and the public is 
cordially invited. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
October 30th at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building (Auditorium) "West Campus. Dr. 
Ralph Slatyer will speak on "Plant Science in 
Australia." 

Dr. Slatyer is a Principal Research Officer with 
the CSIRO Division of Land Research, Canberra, 
Australia. He has broad research interests but has 
concentrated particularly on the energy and water 
relationships of plants and plant communities. He is 
at present at Duke on a NSF Senior Foreign Scientist 
Fellowship. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4:00 
p.m. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. Henry Eyring, President of the American 
Chemical Society and Dean of the Graduate School of 
the University of Utah, will speak at the Chemistry 
Staff Seminar on "Wednesday, October 30th at 8:0*0 
p.m. in Room 116 Chemistry Building. The subject 
of Dr. Eyring's address will be "Some Recent De- 
velopments in the Theory of Liquids." All interested 
persons are cordially invited to attend. 



ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Ecology Seminar will meet on Thursday, 
October 31st at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. The topic of discussion will be 



"Ecological Land Survey" featuring a film intro- 
duced by Dr. R. O. Slatyer, visiting professor of 
plant physiology. All interested persons are cordially 
invited to attend. 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, October 31st at 4:00 p.m. in Room M- 
204 Medical Center. Dr. William P. Wilson of the 
Medical School, will speak on "Physiologic Basis of 
Electroencephalography. ' ' 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Psychology Colloquium will meet on Wednes- 
day, October 30th at 3 :30 p.m. in the auditorium of 
Building 9. The speakers, Professor Donald K. 
Adams, Department of Psychology and Professor 
Emeritus Robert H. Thouless, Cambridge University, 
England, will speak on the subject; W T illiam Mac- 
Dougall. 



JOINT DUKE-UNC PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIUM 

Professor Colin M. Turbayne, University of 
Rochester, will speak on "Books in Running Brooks" 
on Friday, November 1st at 8 :00 p.m. in 213 Caldwell 
Hall, Chapel Hill. All interested members of the 
University Community are invited. 



NORTH CAROLINA HIGH SCHOOL 
FUTURE TEACHER CLUBS 

The annual meeting of the North Carolina Associ- 
ation of High School Future Teacher Clubs will be 
held on Saturday, November 2nd from 9 :00 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. The group will be 
welcomed by Dean M. Margaret Ball of the Woman's 
College. 

Appearing on the program will be Dr. Wilda 
Faust, National FTA Consultant from Washington, 
D. C. ; Dr. Frank Fuller, President of the North Car- 
olina Education Association ; Dr. A. C. Dawson, ex- 
ecutive-secretary of the NCEA; Clifton Edwards, 
Department of Public Instruction ; Miss Mary Soyars, 
Woman's College of the University of North Caro- 
lina ; and William B. Brinkley, Director of Admis- 
sions. Duke University. Eugene Jenkins, President of 
the Association, will preside. The meeting is being 
arranged by Mrs. Phebe Emmons, Field Consultant. 



PRO AMOR LIBRIS 

Provided that a modest number of undergraduates, 
graduate students and faculty members express their 



[4] 



interest in such a venture, it is proposed a Society of 
Book Collectors and Book Lovers under the name Pro 
Amor Libris be founded. The object of the Society 
would be to foster and nourish all aspects of book col- 
lecting and the enjoyment of books. The Society 
would meet every two months and would be a common 
meeting ground for all on the Campus who collect 
books or plan to collect books. Membership would be 
gratis. The proposed Society has received the blessing 
of the Librarian and of several faculty members. All 
interested persons may speak with Mr. Jeremy North 
of the Gothic Bookshop. If a score or more individuals 
indicate their interest then Pro Amor Libris will be 
founded. 



ALVIN AILEY DANCE THEATER 

The Student Union Young Artists Series will 
present The Alvin Ailey Dance Theater on Thursday, 
October 31st at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Tickets 
will be available at Page Box Office from 2 :00 to 5 :00 
p.m., Monday, October 28th to Thursday, October 
31st. Tickets will be priced at $1.50 general admis- 
sion, $1.00 Duke undergraduates, and $.50 for children 
under 12 years of age. 

Mr. Ailey 's group has an immediate and vital 
appeal to people of all ages everywhere. Instrumental 
music, song and acting technique are combined to 
express various dramatic themes or moods. It is dance 
in this idiom of jazz, Latin, "blues," Negro spirituals 
and folk materials that "makes not merely an im- 
pact; it creates a veritable explosion!" 

Alvin Ailey, recently returned from touring the 
far east under the President's Special Intercultural 
Exchange, was hailed as the "freshest and most 
imaginative choreographer on the scene today." He 
demonstrates the beautiful art of story-telling in 
dance. Wherever the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater 
performed, and whatever the suite, their themes, moods 
and movements transcended all cultural barriers. The 
audiences "saw the gaiety, felt the pain, witnessed 
the defiance, enjoyed the laughter and revelled in the 
triumph." 

The program is as follows : 

I. THREE FOR NOW 

A modern jazz suite of three dances investigating the inter- 
relationship between three modern jazz scores and the American 
contemporary dance idiom. 

II. THE BLUES ROLL ON 

From the fields, levees, barrelhouses of the Southern Negro 
sprang the Blues . . . songs of longing, lost-love, anger, desola- 
tion, social discontent — hymns to the secular regions of his 
soul. 

III. REVELATIONS 

This suite explores motivations and emotions of Negro re- 
ligious music, which, like its heir the blues, takes many forms — 
true spirituals with their sustained melodies, song-sermons, 
gospel songs and holy-blues . . . songs of trouble, of love, of 
deliverance. 



UNITED FUND CAMPAIGN 

Duke University's share in the total goal of the 
United Fund of Durham and Durham County is 
reasonably set at $40,000. At the United Fund re- 
porting session on last Tuesday, it was reported that 
Duke University had pledged a total amount of $28,- 
216.98. 

It is hoped that we will reach our goal by Monday, 
October 28th. If you have not returned your signed 
pledge card, please do so now. Return it to the person 
who gave it to you or to Professor Earl I. Brown, 
Room 121 Engineering Building. 



ARCHIVE SUBSCRIPTIONS 
The Archive, Duke's literary magazine, is now 
offering subscription rates of $1.50 a year (four 
issues) to anyone who wishes to subscribe. Please 
send requests to The Archive, Box 4665, Duke Station. 
All checks should be made payable to The Archive. 



1963-64 ARTISTS SERIES 

Season tickets priced at $8.00, and $9.00 are availa- 
ble in Room 202-A Flowers Building. A check payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and should 
be mailed to Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, North Carolina. 
Call 681-0111, Extension 2911, for further information. The 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. on the 
indicated dates. The 1963-64 Series is as follows: 

THE GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER 

Puccini 's ' ' Tosca ' ' Tuesday, December 3 

BACH ARIA GROUP Tuesday, February 4 

William H. Scheide, Director 
Eileen Farrell, Soprano Julius Baker, Flute 

Jan Peerce, Tenor Robert Bloom, Oboe 

Carol Smith, Alto Bernard Greenhouse, Cello 

Norman Farrow, Bass-baritone Maurice Wilk, Violin 
Paul Ulanowsky, Piano 



PRESTI AND LAGOYA, Guitar-Duo 



Tuesday, March 10 



PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Friday, March 20 
William Steinberg, Music Director 



JOHN BROWNING, Pianist 



Friday, April 17 



OFF-THE-SERIES ATTRACTION 1963-64 

Tuesday, November 19 

The Regimental Band and Massed Pipers of the BLACK 
WATCH (Royal Highland Regiment) with Highland Dancers 
from the Edinburgh Festival. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ERASMUS CLUB 



The Erasmus Club will hold its next meeting on 
Monday, November 4th at 8 :00 p.m. in the Green Room 
of East Duke Building. Hans Hillerbraud, Assistant 
Professor of Modern European Christianity, Divinity 
School, will speak on "The Physiognomy of Religious 
Radicalism : Typological Reflections Illustrated by 
George Fox." The public is cordially invited to 
attend. 



[5] 



WEEK OF 



Nov. 3-9, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Nov. 3-9, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, November 3 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. John G. Simpson, 
Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 
Chapel. Preacher: Dr. Robert W. Spike, Na- 
tional Council of the Churches of Christ in 
the U.S.A. Broadcast over Radio Station 
WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
7:00 p.m. Film Forum: "Forbidden Games." 
Presbyterian Student Center on Alexander 
Street. 



Monday, November 4 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Malcolm 
S. Steinberg. Auditorium of Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty and graduate students volley- 
ball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:00 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Speaker: Pro- 
fessor Hans Hillerbrand, Green Room East 
Duke Building. 

8:15 p.m. CORE Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

8:15 p.m. Parapsychology Lecture. Speaker: Dr. 
Robert H. Thouless. Auditorium of Biological 
Sciences Building. 



Tuesday, November 5 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Creighton Lacy. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 
Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

3:30 p.m. Music Department Panel Discussion. 
"Words and Music." Music Room East Duke 
Building. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
Lowell A. Hinrichs. Room 124 Physics Build- 
ing. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00 p.m. Gerontology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
Peter Townsend. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

6:00 p.m. Education Dinner and Lecture. Speaker: 
Professor W. H. Cartwright. Woman's College 
Union Dining Room. 

7:00 p.m. S. U. Away Football Movies. Page Audi- 
torium. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 
Floor, Card Gymnasium 

8:15 p.m. John Duke Lecture-Recital. Music Room 
East Duke Building. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 291 1. 



Wednesday, November 6 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Professor Creighton Lacy. 
12:30 p.m. Faculty Club Luncheon Meeting. Union 
Ballroom West Campus. Speaker : Dean James 
L. Meriam. 

2:15 p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Physics Colloquium. 
Speaker: Dr. Walter Marshall. Room 114 
Physics Building. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Jan 
Kohlmeyer. Room 111 Biological Sciences 
Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Antigone" (Greek). "A mem- 
orable and rewarding experience." — Cook, 
N. Y. World Telegram. "Director Tzavellas 
has brought forth the surging emotions with 
fluid staging and fine photography. He proves 
that its power and anguish can affect audiences 
today. Striking and beautiful." — Alpert, 
Saturday Review. 

7:30 p.m. American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers Meeting. Speaker: Dr. W. R. Hudson. 
Room 1548 Clinical Research Building. 

Thursday, November 7 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Mr. Robert M. Van Hook, II. 
12 :30-l :30 p.m. Faculty and graduate students volley- 
ball. Indoor Stadium. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5 :00-6:00 p.m. Faculty and graduate students volley- 
ball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. Forest Wildlife Lecture. Speaker: Dr. 
Warren W. Chase. Room 111 Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, November 8 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Creighton Lacy and Mr. Hugh H. 
Cameron. 

3:30 p.m. Forest Wildlife Lecture. Speaker: Dr. 
Warren W. Chase. Room 205 Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 



5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:00 p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Philosophy Colloquium. 
Speaker: Professor Ronald J. Butler. 21:1 
Caldwell Hall, Chapel Hill. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union presents: Max Morath in 
Ragtime Revisited. Page Auditorhim. 

Saturday, November 9 

2:00 p.m. Varsity Football: Dnke versus Wake 
Forest. Stadium. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. S. U. Open House. Union Ballroom. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Audi- 
torium. "Antigone" (Greek). "A memorable 
and rewarding experience." — Cook, N. Y. 
World Telegram. "Director Tzavellas has 
brought forth the surging emotions with fluid 
staging and fine photography. He proves that 
its power and anguish can affect audiences 
today. Striking and beautiful." — Alpert, 
Saturday Review. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Friday, Center, 6:15 
P.M., Supper, followed by worship and seminars. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke 



ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
Chapel. All are welcome. 



EPISCOPAL UNIVERSITY CENTER: Sunday, 
9:30 A.M., Center, Holy Communion: 6:15 P.M.. 
Evensong; 7:00 P.M., Film Forum (Presbyterian 
Center). Monday, 7:00 P.M., Center, Evenings of 
Dialogue — Dr. Herman Salinger will give a reading 
from his recently published volume of poetry. All 
members of the University community are invited. 
Wednesday, 7:10 A.M. and 5:30 P.M.,' Center, Holy 
Communion. Friday, 3:15 P.M., Center, Seminar on 
Orthodoxy. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Sunday, 
6 :30 P.M., Green Room, East Duke Building, A dis- 
cussion on: "My Sex Life — A Religious Issue? A 
Moral Issue? A Social Issue?" Discussion Leader, 
Bill Patton, Lutheran Chaplain. Thursday, 7 :15 
A.M., East Duke Chapel, Communion Service. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9 :00 A.M., Center. 
Freshman Forum; 6:00 P.M., Center, Holy Com- 
munion. Tuesday, 7 :30 P.M.. Center, Seminar — "The 
Meaning of Freedom." Thursday, 9 :00 P.M., Dining 
Room C of the Men's Graduate Center, Graduate 
Study Group. 

UNITED STUDENT FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 6:00 
P.M., The USF will meet at the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. Donald Fluke, 2703 Sevier Street. After supper 
and a short business meeting the group will go to the 
Presbyterian Student Center for the Film Forum. 



[ 



o 1 



Transportation will leave the Chapel, East Campus 
circle and Hanes House at 5 :45 P.M. 

WESTMINSTER HOUSE: Sunday, 6:15 P.M., 
Vespers; 7:00 P.M., Film Forum, followed by dis- 
cussion and coffee. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike, Executive 
Director, Commission on Religion and Race, National 
Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A., will 
deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, November 3rd, in 
the University Chapel. 

The order of worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend A. Jack Wilson, III, Associ- 
ate Director of Religious Activities. 

Lector: The Eeverend Jack W. Carroll, Chaplain to Method- 
ist Students 

Opening Organ Voluntary — Andante from Concerto I Handel 
Two Chorale Preludes Brahms 

Choral Call to Worship—' ' The Lord Is in His Holy Temple ' ' 

Calvin W. Laufer 

Hymn — "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name! " Oliver Holden 

The Prayer of Adoration 

The Lord's Prayer 

Anthem — ' ' Master, Show Thy Mercy L T nto Us ! " 

Hans Leo Hassler 

Scripture Lesson 

Hymn— "Rise Up, O Men of God! " Eooert G. MeCutclian 

Call to Prayer 

The Pastoral Prayer of Confession, Thanksgiving, Intercession, 
Petition and Dedication. 

The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — ' ' His Yoke Is Easy, and His Burthen Is Light ' ' 

from The Messiah George Handel 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 

Sermon 

Prayer 

Benediction 

Choral Response — "Dresden Amen" Dresden 

The Chimes 

Closing Organ Voluntary — Pugue in G minor BacJi 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship nest 
Sunday, November 10th, is The Reverend Professor 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. 



FILM FORUM 



The Film Forum, sponsored by the Campus 
Christian Centers, will present "Forbidden Games" at 
7 :00 p.m. on Sunday, November 3rd, in the Presby- 
terian Student Center on Alexander Street. This 
is an open meeting with coffee and discussion follow- 
ing the film. 

"Forbidden Games," a French film which won the 
grand prize at the Venice Film Festival and the New 
York Film Critics Award raises the question — What 
is the nature of war when viewed through the eyes of 
children who have not learned to understand or ac- 
cept the adults' rationalizations? 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, November 4th, at 4:15 p.m. in 
the Auditorium of the Biological Sciences Building. 
Dr. Malcolm S. Steinberg, Assistant Professor, Johns 
Hopkins University will speak on "Tissue Recon- 
struction by Dissociated Cells: Its Relation to 
Morphogenetic Mechanisms." Coffee and tea will be 
served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



ERASMUS CLUB 



The Erasmus Club will hold its next meeting on 
Monday, November 4th at 8 :00 p.m. in the Green Room 
of East Duke Building. Hans Hillerbrand, Assistant 
Professor of Modern European Christianity, Divinity 
School, will speak on "The Physiognomy of Religious 
Radicalism : Typological Reflections Illustrated by 
George Fox." The public is cordially invited to 
attend. 



CORE MEETING 



The organizational group of CORE will meet on 
Monday, November 4th at 8:15 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. Committee reports will be given 
and discussed. Plans for the coming year will be 
made and new committees will be organized. 



PARAPSYCHOLOGY LECTURE 

Dr. Robert H. Thouless, Reader Emeritus of 
Cambridge University, England, will speak on "The 
Parapsychologist's Difficulties About Parapsy- 
chology" on Monday, November 4th at 8:15 p.m. in 
the Auditorium of the Biological Sciences Building. 
The public is cordially invited to attend. 



JOHN DUKE 
LECTURE-RECITAL 
PANEL DISCUSSION 



Mr. John Duke, eminent American song composer 
and pianist, and member of the faculty of Smith 
College since 1923 — currently Henry Dyke Sleeper 
Professor of Music — will be on Campus under the 
auspices of the Department of Music on Tuesday, 
November 5th. The first event of Mr. Duke's visit 
will be his role as guest participant in a panel dis- 
cussion "Words and Music," at 3:30 p.m. in the 
Music Room East Duke Building. Other members 
of the panel will be Dr. Bernard Duffey, writer and 
specialist in American poetry and a member of the 
English Department; Mr. Iain Hamilton, composer 
and Mary Duke Biddle Professor of Music. Mrs. 
Ruth Friedberg of the Department of Music will 
serve as moderator. 

A lecture-recital consisting of songs composed by 
Mr. Duke will be presented that evening at 8 :15 p.m. 
in the Music Room East Duke Building. Mr. Duke 
will act as lecturer and piano accompanist and will be 



[3] 



assisted by the following singers : Miss Claudia Bray, 
now a graduate student at Smith, was a graduate of 
Duke University and a former student of Professor 
John Hanks ; Dr. Joel Carter, bass-baritone and mem- 
ber of the Department of Music at the University of 
North Carolina; and Mr. John Hanks, tenor, of the 
Music Department. 

An informal reception will follow in the East Duke 
Parlors. All members of the University Community 
and general public are cordially invited to attend 
both functions. 

The songs to be performed are as follows : 



In the Fields 
The End of the World 
Luke Havergal 
Richard Cory 
Miniver Cheevy 
Twentieth Century 



Mr. Carter 



(Charlotte Mew) 

(Archibald MacLeish) 

(E. A. Robinson) 

(E. A. Robinson) 

(E. A. Robinson) 

(Robert Hillyer) 



II 



Bells in the Rain 

My soul is an enchanted boat 

I Carry Your Heart 

Wild Swans 

Rapunzel 

Evening 



Miss Bray 
Intermission 

III 

Loveliest of Trees 

Reveille 

Oh, it. was out by Donnycarney 

Viennese Waltz 

Only for me 

Credo 

Mr. Hanks 



(Elinor Wylie) 

(Percy Bysshe Shelley) 

(e. e. cummings) 

(Edna St. Vincent Millay) 

(Adelaide Crapsey) 

(Frederic Prokosch) 



(A. E. Housman) 

(A. E. Housman) 

(James Joyce) 

(Elinor Wylie) 

(Mark van Doren) 

(E. A. Robinson) 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 

The Mathematics Department will hold a seminar 
on Tuesday, November 5th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 114 
Physics Building. Dr. Lowell A. Hinrichs will speak 
on ' ' Unusual Topologies on the Integers. ' ' Coffee will 
be served at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 124 Physics Building. 



GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Council on Gerontology will hold a seminar on 
Tuesday, November 5th at 5 :00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. Dr. Peter Townsend, Lecturer in 
Social Administration, London School of Economics 
and Political Science, Professor of Sociology, Uni- 
versity of Essex will speak on "Family Relationships 
of the Aged in the United States, Denmark and 
Britain." All interested persons are invited to 
attend. 



EDUCATION LECTURE 

Kappa Delta Pi, education honorary, will sponsor 
a lecture given by Professor W. H. Cartwright, a 
member of the Conant team that studied the educa- 
tion of American teachers, on Tuesday, November 5th 
at 6:00 p.m. in the "Woman's College Union Dining 
Room. Professor Cartwright 's address will be "The 



Education of American Teachers." All interested 
persons are cordially invited to attend. 

Persons who are not regular patrons of the Dining 
Hall will buy tickets in the lobby, go through the 
cafeteria line, and take their trays to the dining room 
upstairs. Professor Cartwright 's address will begin 
about 6 :30 p.m. 



FACULTY CLUB MEETING 

The Faculty Club will meet for luncheon in the 
Union Ballroom on Wednesday, November 6th, at 
12 :30 p.m. Dean James L. Meriam, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Engineering, will be the speaker, and his topic, 
"Aims of Engineering Education at Duke." The cost 
of $1.25 will be paid at the door. All those who ex- 
pect to attend are requested to return the reservation 
card by Monday, November 4th. 



JOINT DUKE-UNC PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. Walter Marshall, Atomic Energy Research 
Establishment, Harwell, Britain, will speak on "Re- 
cent Work on Critical Phenomena in Ferromagnets 
and Antiferromagnets" on Wednesday, November 6th 
at 2 :15 p.m. in Room 114 Physics Building. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
November 6th at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Dr. Jan Kohlmeyer of the Duke 
Marine Laboratory and Department of Botany will 
speak on "Mycological Investigations at the Berlin 
Museum. ' ' 

Dr. Kohlmeyer is associate curator of the Botani- 
cal Museum, West Berlin, and is now serving as re- 
search associate in mycology in the Department of 
Botany. Dr. Kohlmeyer is an authority on the 
morphology of marine Ascomycetes. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS MEETING 

The American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 
Eastern North Carolina Sub-Section, Technical Group 
on Research will have a meeting on Wednesday, No- 
vember 6th at 7 :30 p.m. in Room 1548 Clinical Re- 
search Building. Dr. W. R. Hudson, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, 
Medical Center, will speak on "Electrophysiological 
Responses in Audition." 



FOREST WILDLIFE LECTURES 

Sponsored by the Visiting Scientist Program of 
the Society of American Foresters, the National Sci- 
ence Foundation, and the Duke School of Forestry, 
Dr. Warren W. Chase will present two forest wildlife 
lectures on Thursdav and Friday, November 7th and 



[4] 



8th. Dr. Chase, presently Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Wildlife Management at the University of 
Michigan, did his undergraduate work at Macalester 
College and took the Ph.D. Degree at the University 
of Minnesota. His professional experience includes 
twelve years as a regional biologist with the federal 
government and twenty-three years in teaching and 
research. He is a member of Xi Sigma Pi, Sigma Xi, 
Phi Sigma, the Society of American Foresters, and 
the Wildlife Society. He has written extensively in 
the fields of Soils, Forestry, and Wildlife. 

On Thursday, November 7th at 7 :30 p.m. in Room 
111 Biological Sciences Building, Dr. Chase will 
speak on "Forest and Wildlife Management on 
Private Lands." On Friday, November 8th at 3:30 
p.m. in Room 205 Biological Sciences Building he will 
speak on "Ecological Concepts Useful in Forest Wild- 
life Management." 

All interested persons are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



JOINT DUKE-UNC PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIUM 

Professor Ronald J. Butler of the Department of 
Philosophy, University of Toronto, will speak in 213 
Caldwell Hall, Chapel Hill, on Friday, November 
8th at 8 :00 p.m. The subject of Mr. Butler's address 
will be "Hume's Theory of Perceptions." All mem- 
bers of the University Community are invited. 



STUDENT UNION PRESENTS 
MAX MORATH'S "RAGTIME REVISITED" 

A novel entertainment, will be available for those 
who through nostalgia or curiosity come to Page 
Auditorium at 8 :15 p.m. on Friday, November 8th, to 
hear Ragtime as Revisited by one Max Morath, a 
singer and pianist who describes himself as "a man 
completely out of touch with his environment" as he 
presents an amiable and warm-hearted panorama of 
the music of that American age of innocence that ex- 
tended from the nineties through World War I. His 
program includes piano syncopations, Tin Pan Alley 
memorabilia, and Magic Lantern Tableau. 

Morath 's ragtime keeps him busy with a steady 
round of performances for colleges, conventions, and 
nightclubs. For television, in addition to commercial 
and guest appearances, he has written and performed 
two series for National Educational Television. He is 
an Epic recording artist, and is active as a writer and 
composer. 

General admission tickets, priced at $1.00 for 
adults and $.50 for children, will be available on 
campus during the week and at the door the night of 
the performance from the Student Union Special 
Activities Committee. 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 

There will be no meeting of the Undergraduate 
Faculty Council in November. 



SUMMER PLACEMENT REGISTRATION 

It is important that all Duke undergraduate and 
graduate students stop by the Summer Placement 
Office in Room 212 Flowers Building, if they are in- 
terested in registering for summer work. Requests 
for summer personnel, both technical and non-techni- 
cal, are received every day, and only by completing 
the registration form can students indicate their 
availability for consideration. Office hours are posted 
on the door, or appointments can be made to see Mr. 
Robert Detweiler, Director of Summer Placement, in 
Room 214 Flowers Building. 



PRO AMOR LIBRIS 



Provided that a modest number of undergraduates, 
graduate students and faculty members express their 
interest in such a venture, it is proposed a Society of 
Book Collectors and Book Lovers under the name Pro 
Amor Libris be founded. The object of the Society 
would be to foster and nourish all aspects of book col- 
lecting and the enjoyment of books. The Society 
would meet every two months and would be a common 
meeting ground for all on the Campus who collect 
books or plan to collect books. Membership would be 
gratis. The proposed Society has received the blessing 
of the Librarian and of several faculty members. All 
interested persons may speak with Mr. Jeremy North 
of the Gothic Bookshop. If a score or more individuals 
indicate their interest then Pro Amor Libris will be 
founded. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 

Heinz Wunderlich, distinguished German organist 
of St. Jacobi Church, Hamburg, will present an organ 
recital in the University Chapel on Sunday, November 
10th, at 4:00 p.m. The public is extended a cordial 
invitation to hear this important artist considered 
by many to be "a virtuoso of greatest style" and "an 
impressive mediator of Bach 's piety. ' ' 

The program follows : 

Cantio Sacra: Samuel Scheldt 

(1587-1654) 
"Warum betriibst du dich, mein Herz" 
(12 Choral variations) 
Prelude and Fugue in D Major Johann Sebastian Bach 

(1685-1750) 
Passaeaglia in C Minor Johann Sebastian Bach 

Pantasie and Fugue on B-A-O-H Franz Liszt 

(1811-1886) 
Sonata on a Single Theme Heinz Wunderlich 

(1919- ) 
CTranquiTlo/Anegro-agitato-Peeitativo — Toccata fugatal 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY 

PROFESSORS MEETING 

AAUP will meet on Tuesday, November 12th at 
8:00 p.m. in Room 111 Biological Sciences Building. 
The speaker will be Dr. Samuel Proctor Massie, II 
President of North Carolina College. All interested 
persons are invited to attend. 



[5] 



THE NINETEENTH QUADRENNIAL 
ECUMENICAL STUDENT CONFERENCE 

The Nineteenth Quadrennial Ecumenical Student 
Conference is scheduled to be held December 27- 
January 2, at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. The 
cost of attending the conference is $59.00 plus trans- 
portation. Students who are interested in going 
should contact Chaplain Howard C. Wilkinson within 
the next few days. Sponsored by the National Student 
Christian Federation, the conference's theme is "For 
the Life of the World." 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

"BLACK WATCH" TO APPEAR IN 

INDOOR STADIUM 

On Tuesday, November 19th at 8 :15 p.m. the 
Regimental Band and Massed Pipers of the Black 
Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) with Highland 
Dancers from the Edinburgh Festival, will appear 
in the Indoor Stadium under the auspices of the 
Artists Series. 

Trumpet fanfares, rumbling drums and the stirring- 
skirl of the Massed Pipers launches the brilliant and 
moving spectacle of marching ceremonies, rousing- 
music and highland dancing which this world-famous 
regiment, brings to North America. 

Tickets priced at $2.50 and $2.00 for adults and 
$1.25 and $1.00 for children are on sale in Room 
202-A Flowers Building or write to Box KM, Duke 
Station (enclose self-addressed stamped envelope). 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
FACULTY CLUB SQUARE DANCE 

The Faculty Club will sponsor a Folk and Square 
Dance Party in the Woman's College gymnasium on 
Thursday, November 21st, at 8:15 p.m. It is not 
necessary to have a partner to attend. All faculty and 
staff members will be welcome. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION LECTURES 

The Religion Department will present Dr. John A. 
Meyendorf, Professor of Church History, St. Vladi- 
mir's Orthodox Theological Seminary in New York 
State, on Wednesday and Thursday, November 20th 
and 21st in Room 208 Flowers Building. Dr. Meyen- 
dorf will give two public lectures. His first lecture, 
"Recent Trends in the Orthodox View of the Church" 
will be delivered at 8 :00 p.m. on Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 20th. His second lecture, "Protestantism. 
Orthodoxy, and the Ecumenical Movement" will be 
given at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 21st. The 
University Communitv is cordiallv invited. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

DUKE STUDENT SYMPOSIUM 

"CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE— 

A POST-HUMAN AGE?" 

The Duke Student Symposium, "Contemporary 
Literature — A Post-Human Age?" will be held on 
Campus Sunday, November 10th through Wednesday, 
November 13th with evening sessions beginning at 
7 :30 p.m. The Sunday through Tuesday sessions will 
be held in Page Auditorium and the final meeting in 
Woman's College Auditorium. The speakers will be 
Dr. Thomas Driver, Assistant Professor of Christian 
Theology at Union Theological Seminary; Ralph Elli- 
son, author of "The Invisible Man" which won the 
National Book Award for fiction ; W. D. Snodgrass, 
whose first volume of poetry, "Heart's Needle," won 
a Pulitzer Prize; and Walt Kelly, satirist and creator 
of "Pogo." 

The Symposium hopes to provoke thought center- 
ing around the problems of contemporary literature 
and what this literature has to say to modern man. 
It will endeavor to look into the interrelationship be- 
tween literature and society, how each affects the other 
and what each can learn from the other. 

All sessions are open to the public without charge. 
Th is annual symposium is completely sponsored by 
the major student organizations. 



WEEK OF 

Nov. 10-16, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 

Nov. 10-16,1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, November 10 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. John G. Simpson, 
Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Eeverend Professor 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon : 
"Some Reflections on Death." Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
4:00 p.m. Guest Organ Recital. Guest Organist: 

Heinz Wunderlich. University Chapel. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Student Symposium. Page Audi- 
torium. Speaker: Dr. Thomas F. Driver. 



Monday, November 11 



4:00 



4:15 



p.m. Physiology Seminar. Room M-204 Medi- 
cal Center. Speaker : Dr. A. D. Bangham. 
p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium of Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Michael 
Salmon. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Student Symposium. Page Audi- 
torium. Speaker: Mr. Walt Kelly. 

Tuesday, November 12 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor W. F. Stinespring. 



11:30 a.m. Engineering Seminar. Room 125 Engi- 
neering Building. Speaker: Dr. Albert G. H. 
Dietz. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
2:30 p.m. Final examination of Mr. Paul Clouser 
for the Ph.D. degree in Physics. Room 218 
Physics Building. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Student Symposium. Page Audi- 
torium. Speaker: Mr. W. D. Snodgrass. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 
Floor, Card Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. American Association of University Pro- 
fessors Meeting. Auditorium of Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Samuel 
Proctor Massie, II. 



Wednesday, November 13 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Professor W. F. Stinespring. 
11:00 a.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 

Speaker : Dr. Charles R. Stinnette, Jr. 
12:30 p.m. Campus Club Luncheon. Hope Valley 

Country Club. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker : Dr. Lloyd T. 
Evans. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:05 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. J. M. Synge's "The Playboy 
of the Western World" (Irish), starring 
Siobhan McKenna in Eastman Color. "Classic 
piece of strong, sarcastic humor, bubbling and 
bursting with wonderful folk-imagination and 
force of character." — Crowther, New York 
Times. "A world masterpiece . . . what 
language, what eloquence." — Winsten, N. Y. 
Post. "A joy: absolute and unbounded!" — 
Newsweek. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Student Symposium. Woman's 
College Auditorium. Speaker: Mr. Ralph 
Ellison. 

Thursday, November 14 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Mr. Ingram C. Parniley. 
12:30 p.m. Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mary Rhodes. 
12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and graduate students volley- 
ball. Indoor Stadium. 
4:00 p.m. Physiology Lecture. Room M-204 Medical 

Center. Speaker: Dr. George C. Cotzias. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 

Coombs Field. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 

Room 208 Asbury Building. 
8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, November 15 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Holy Baptism. Professor James T. Cleland, 
Celebrant. 
3:00 p.m. Political Science Graduate Seminar. 
Room 302 Library. Speaker : Professor W. W. 
Kulski, Visiting James B. Duke Professor of 
Russian Affairs. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:15 p.m. Dad's Day Combined Concert. Page 
Auditorium. 



2:00 



6:30 



7:05 



Saturday, November 16 

p.m. Varsity Football: Duke versus United 
States Naval Academy. Stadium. 
p.m. Student Union presents: The Smothers 
Brothers. Indoor Stadium. 
and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. J. M. Synge's "The Playboy of 
the Western World" (Irish), starring Siobhan 
McKenna in Eastman Color. "Classic piece of 
strong, sarcastic humor, bubbling and bursting 
with wonderful folk-imagination and force of 
character." — Crowther, New York Times. "A 
world masterpiece . . . what language, what 
eloquence." — Winsten, N. Y. Post. "A joy: 
absolute and unbounded ! ' ' — Newsweek. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Sunday, 1:45 P.M., 
Rides leave from East and West circles for the 
Murdoch School at Butner. Friday, 6:15 P.M., 
Baptist Student Center, Supper followed by worship 
and forum : Dr. Thomas E. McCollough will follow-up 
a discussion of the symposium. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL UNIVERSITY CENTER: Sunday, 
9 :30 A.M., Chapel of St. Michael at the Center, Holy 
Communion; 6:15 P.M., Evensong; 7:30 P.M., Duke 
Symposium : Dr. Thomas Driver. Monday, 7 :30 P.M., 
Page Auditorium, Duke Symposium (This will replace 
"Evenings of Dialogue" for this week.) ; 9:00 P.M., 
Center, Lay Reader's Class. Wednesday, 7:10 A.M. 
and 5:30 P.M., Chapel of St. Michael, Holy Com- 
munion. Friday, 4:00 P.M., Center, Seminar on 
"Christianity and Modern Man." 

There will be a celebration of Holy Communion at 
the Episcopal University Center on Thanksgiving 
Day at 9:30 A.M. All members of the University 
community are welcome. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Sunday, 
6 :30 P.M., Green Room, East Duke Building, "My Sex 
Life; A Moral Issue? A Social Issue? A Religious 
Issue?" Discussion (second part) led by Bill Patton, 
Lutheran Chaplain. The meeting will adjourn in 
time to attend the Symposium. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9 :00 A.M., Center, 
Freshman Forum — Continuing discussion of worship ; 
6 :00 P.M., Center, Evening Prayer. There will be no 
Forum hour Sunday because of the Symposium. Tues- 
day, 7:00 P.M., Center, "The Meaning of Freedom" 
Seminar. Thursday, 9:00 P.M., Men's Graduate 
Center, "Contemporary Criticisms of Christianity" 
Seminar. 

On Sunday, November 17, at 6 .-00 P.M., there will 
be a Congregational Meal at the Methodist Center. 
This will be followed by a discussion of the Ecumeni- 
cal Council. The University community is invited. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: 
Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., The UCCF will meet at the home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Herzog, 2936 Chapel Hill 



[2] 



Road. After supper and a short business meeting 
the group will attend the opening meeting of the 
University Symposium in Page Auditorium. Trans- 
portation will leave the Chapel, East Campus circle, 
and Hanes House at 5 :15 P.M. 

WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: There will be no 
meeting on Sunday because of the Symposium. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean 
of the Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, 
November 10th, in the University Chapel. His 
subject will be "Some Reflections on Death." The 
order of worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University. 
Lector: The Reverend W. Robert Mill, Chaplain to Episcopal 

Students. 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Prelude, Fugue and Variation 

Franck 
Choral Call to Worship — ' ' The Lord Is in His Holy Temple ' ' 

Calvin W. Laufer 
Hymn — ' ' Strong Son of God, Immortal Love ' ' John B. Dylces 
The Prayer of Adoration 
The Lord 's Prayer 

Anthem — ' ' Oh, Worship the Lord ' ' Henry Purcell 

Scripture Lesson — Ecclesiastes 3:19-21; I Corinthians 15:22-26 
Hymn — ' ' For All the Saints ' ' Ralph Vaughan Williams 

Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayer of Confession, Thanksgiving, Intercession, 

Petition and Dedication 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem—' ' Strike the Cymbal, Bow the String ! ' ' 

Franz Schubert 

Response — The Doxology 

Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — "Some Reflections on Death" 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — ' ' Sevenfold Amen ' ' John Stainer 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — We All Believe in One God, 

Father Bach 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, November 17th is the Reverend Dr. McMurry 
S. Richey. Associate Professor of Theology and 
Christian Nurture in the Divinity School. 



Franz Liszt 
(1811-1886) 
Heinz Wunderlich 
(1919- ) 
(Tranquillo/Allegro-agitato-Recitativo — Toccata fugata) 



Fantasie and Fugue on B-A-C-H 
Sonata on a Single Theme 



GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 

Heinz Wunderlich, distinguished German organist 
of St. Jacobi Church, Hamburg, will present an organ 
recital in the University Chapel on Sunday, November 
10th, at 4:00 p.m. The public is extended a cordial 
invitation to hear this important artist considered 
by many to be " a virtuoso of greatest style ' ' and ' ' an 
impressive mediator of Bach's piety." 

The program follows : 

Cantio Sacra: Samuel Scheldt 

(1587-1654) 
"Warum betriibst du dich, mein Herz" 
(12 Choral variations) 
Prelude and Fugue in D Major Johann Sebastian Bach 

(1685-1750) 
Passacaglia in C Minor Johann Sebastian Bach 



DUKE STUDENT SYMPOSIUM 

"CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE— 

A POST-HUMAN AGE?" 

The Duke Student Symposium, "Contemporary 
Literature — A Post-Human Age?" will be held on 
Campus Sunday, November 10th through Wednesday, 
November 13th with evening sessions beginning at 
7 :30 p.m. The Sunday through Tuesday sessions will 
be held in Page Auditorium and the final meeting in 
Woman's College Auditorium. The speakers will be 
Dr. Thomas Driver, Assistant Professor of Christian 
Theology at Union Theological Seminary ; Ralph Elli- 
son, author of "The Invisible Man" which won the 
National Book Award for fiction ; W. D. Snodgrass, 
whose first volume of poetry, "Heart's Needle," won 
a Pulitzer Prize ; and Walt Kelly, satirist and creator 
of "Pogo." 

The Symposium hopes to provoke thought center- 
ing around the problems of contemporary literature 
and what this literature has to say to modern man. 
It will endeavor to look into the interrelationship be- 
tween literature and society, how each affects the other 
and what each can learn from the other. 

All sessions are open to the public without charge. 
This annual symposium is completely sponsored by 
the major student organizations. 

SUNDAY, November 10 

Introduction of Program — Page Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 
Bill Nichols, Dr. Douglas M. Knight 
Keynote Address 
DR. TOM F. DRIVER, 
' ' Poetry, Prose and People ' ' 
Panel Discussion, Page Auditorium, 9:00 p.m. 
"Man in the Modern Age" 

Dr. Tom F. Driver, Mr. Ralph Ellison, Mr. Walt Kelly, 
Mr. W. D. Snodgrass, Rev. Robert Mill 

MONDAY, November 11 

Informal Coffees, 3:30 p.m. 

Men 's Dorm : Independent Lounge — Dr. Tom F. Driver 
Freshman Dorm: House O — Mr. Ralph Ellison 
Alumni Room : East Duke Building — Mr. Walt Kelly 
Hanes Recreation Area — Mr. W. D. Snodgrass 

Address, Page Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 

MR. WALT KELLY 

"Pogo Speaks" 

Panel Discussion, Page Auditorium, 9:00 p.m. 

"The 'Hero' and 'Tragedy' in Modern Literature" 

Dr. Tom F. Driver, Mr. Ralph Ellison, Mr. Walt Kelly, Mr. 
W. D. Snodgrass, Dr. W. D. White 

TUESDAY, November 12 

Informal Coffees, 3:30 p.m. 

Men's Dorm: Independent Lounge — Mr. Ralph Ellison 
Freshman Dorm: House O — Dr. Tom F. Driver 
Alumni Room, East Duke Building — Mr. W. D. Snodgrass 
Hanes Recreation Area — Mr. Walt Kelly 

Address, Page Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 

MR. W. D. SNODGRASS 

"An Overview: 1870-1970" 

Panel Discussion, Page Auditorium, 9:00 p.m. 

"The Writer Today" 

Dr. Tom F. Driver, Mr. Ralph Ellison, Mr. Walt Kelly, Mr. 
W. D. Snodgrass, Mr. Reynolds Price 



[3] 



WEDNESDAY, November IS 

Informal Coffees, 3:30 p.m. 

Men's Dorm: Independent Lounge — Mr. Walt Kelly 
Freshman Dorm : House O — Mr. W. D. Snodgrass 
Alumni Eoom, East Duke Building — Mr. Ralph Ellison 
Hanes Recreation Area — Dr. Tom F. Driver 

Address, Woman's College Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 

MR. RALPH ELLISON 

' ' The Novel and The American Experience ' ' 

Panel Discussion, Page Auditorium, 9:00 p.m. 

Open Topic 

Dr. Tom F. Driver, Mr. Ralph Ellison, Mr. Walt Kelly, Mr. 
W. D. Snodgrass 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology will hold a seminar 
on Monday, November 11th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
M-204 Medical Center. Dr. A. D. Bang-ham, Agri- 
cultural Research Council, Institute of Animal Phys- 
iology, Cambridge, England, will speak on "The 
Physical Structure and Behavior of Lipids. Reflec- 
tions on the ' Unit Membrane. ' ' ' 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 



The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, November 11th in the Auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building at 4 :15 p.m. Mr. 
Michael Salmon, University of Maryland will speak 
on "Courtship in Fiddler Crabs. " Coffee and tea will 
be served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



ENGINEERING SEMINAR 

Dr. Albert G. H. Dietz of the Engineering School 
at M. I. T. will present the second" of the 1963-64 
series of seminars sponsored by the College of Engi- 
neering. He will speak on "Reinforced Plastics as 
Engineering Materials'' at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, 
November 12th in Room 125 of the Engineering 
Building. The public is invited to attend. 

Dr. Dietz is currently serving as a Director of the 
American Society for Testing Materials. He has 
served as a member of the Engineering Education 
Commission to Japan and has been quite active in 
materials study in the Materials Division of the 
M. I. T. School of Engineering. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Paul Clouser for the 
Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held on Tuesdav, 
November 12th at 2:30 p.m. in Room 218 Physics 
Building. The subject of Mr. Clouser 's dissertation is 
"Millimeter and Submillimeter Microwave Spectros- 
copy of the Alkali Chlorides." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Walter 
Gordy, Eugene Greuling, Horst Meyer, Frank 
Tangherlini, and J. H. Roberts. Professor Gordy will 
preside. 



THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF 
UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS MEETING 

The AAUP's first meeting of the academic year will 
be held at 8 :00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 12th in 
the Auditorium of the Biological Sciences Building. 
The speaker for the evening, Dr. Samuel Proctor 
Massie, II, President of North Carolina College, has 
expressed interest in commenting on some effects 
of the crisis in civil rights on higher education of 
Negroes. The meeting is open to all. 

Local chapter dues of $1.00 are once again in order. 
The treasurer Miss Marianna Jenkins, will be prepared 
to accept these at the meeting or by mail at the De- 
partment of Art, Asbury Building. 

The chapter cordially invites new members, both 
active and junior for the AAUP. The principal re- 
quirement is a current responsibility involving at least 
half-time teaching and/or research. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURE 

Dr. Charles R. Stinnette, Jr. will lecture on ' ' The 
Pastoral Ministry in Theological Perspective" on 
"Wednesday, November 13th at 11 :00 a.m. in York 
Chapel. The public is invited to attend. 

Dr. Stinnette is a graduate of North Carolina State 
College at Raleigh, and received his divinity degree 
from Union Theological Seminary in New York. At 
Hartford Theological Seminary he was awarded the 
S.T.M. degree, and at Columbia University the Ph.D. 
degree. He is an ordained priest of the Episcopal 
Church, and served as an Army Chaplain during the 
war. 

He held the post of Chaplain and Professor of 
Religion at Rochester University, later served as a 
rector in Rochester and became a Canon of the 
Washington Cathedral. He taught for six years in 
Union Theological Seminary before assuming his 
present chair as Professor of Pastoral Theology at the 
University of Chicago. He is the author of* several 
books: Anxiety and Faith: Faith, Freedom, and 
Selfhood: and Grace and the Searching of Our Heart 
which appeared in 1962. 



CAMPUS CLUB LUNCHEON 

The Campus Club will honor Mrs. Douglas M. 
Knight at a luncheon at the Hope Valley Country 
Club on Wednesday, November 13th, at 12:30 p.m. 
The hostess departments include: West Administra- 
tion, Alumni Affairs and Public Relations with Mrs. 
Everett H. Hopkins serving as Chairman. 

The entertainment will include a violin concert 
played by Joseph Pepper, visiting artist, and accom- 
panied by Loren Withers, Professor of Piano, Depart- 
ment of Music. Marjorie Randolph, '63, a pupil of 
John Hanks, Professor of Voice, Department of Music, 
will present a series of songs accompanying herself 
on the lute. 

Tickets are available from Mrs. Frank Bowers 
until ten o'clock Monday morning, November 11th. 



[4] 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
November 13th at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Dr. Lloyd T. Evans will speak 
on "The Canberra Phytotron. and Its Role in Re- 
search." 

Dr. Evans, officer-in-charge of the CSIRO phy- 
totron, CERES, at Canberra, is working this winter 
at the U. S. Department of Agriculture Plant Industry 
Station, Beltsville, Maryland. Dr. Evans is a native 
of New Zealand. He did his doctoral research in 
England and postdoctoral research at the Earhart 
Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology. 
From California he went to Australia to the Division 
of Plant Industry of CSIRO. He was closely con- 
cerned with the planning of the Australian phytotron 
and was put in charge of it when it was constructed. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4:00 
p.m. 



ECOLOGY SEMINAR 



The Ecology Seminar will meet on Thursday, 
November 14th at 12 :30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Mary Rhodes, graduate student 
in Botany, will speak on "Seed Germination in Shortia 
Galacifolia. ' ' Interested persons are invited to attend. 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, November 14th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
M-204 Medical Center. Dr. George C. Cotzias, Head, 
Physiology Division, Brookhaven National Labora- 
tory, Associated Universities, Incorporated, will speak 
on ' ' Homeostasis and Trace Elements. ' ' 



POLITICAL SCIENCE GRADUATE SEMINAR 

The Political Science Graduate Seminar will meet 
in Room 302 West Library at 3 :00 p.m. on Friday, 
November 15th. Professor W. W. Knlski, Visiting 
James B. Duke Professor of Russian Affairs, will speak 
on "Dissonant Voices in the Communist World." 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY 

AND THE TRIANGLE SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

The Durham Civic Choral Society and the Triangle 
Svmphonv Orchestra will perform Puccini's Messa 
di Gloria and Bach's Cantata 150 ("Lord, to Thee") 
on Monday, November 25th, at 8:15 p.m. in the 
Woman's College Auditorium. The concert will be 
conducted by Dr. Paul Bryan. John Hanks will sing 
the tenor solos. The entire Duke Community is in- 
vited, and admission is free. 



STUDENT UNION PRESENTS 
THE SMOTHERS BROTHERS 

The Major Attractions Committee of the Duke 
University Student Union will present The Smothers 
Brothers on Saturday, November 16th at 6 :30 p.m. 
in the Indoor Stadium. The Smothers Brothers, a 
folk-singing comedy group, will present folk songs 
laced with satirical patter. The New York Times said, 
' ' The\ r smother the folk song craze in wit ! ' ' General 
admission tickets are $1.50, and will go on sale Satur- 
day, November 9th on the Main Quadrangle. They 
will also be on sale the afternoon of the performance 
from 5 :00 p.m. until show time at the Indoor Stadium 
Box Office. 



DAD'S DAY COMBINED CONCERT 

The Men's and Women's Glee Club under the 
direction of Mr. James Young will present their an- 
nual Dad's Day Combined Concert on Friday, Novem- 
ber 15th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Special 
guest soloists will be Tina Pf ohl and Byung Kwon, and 
the accompanists will be John Ruggero and William 
Watson. The Glee Clubs will present a program 
consisting of music from sacred to secular, and classi- 
cal to modern. Special highlights of the program will 
be Vaughan Williams' A Sea Symphony (first move- 
ment) and selections from Porgy and Bess by George 
Gershwin. 

Admission will be $1.00 at the door or tickets may 
be obtained by calling Extension 3898. The Univer- 
sity Community is cordially invited to attend. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 



DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION LECTURES 

The Religion Department will present Dr. John A. 
Meyendorf, Professor of Church History, St. Vladi- 
mir's Orthodox Theological Seminary in New York 
State, on Wednesday and Thursday, November 20th 
and 21st in Room 208 Flowers Buildiug. Dr. Meyen- 
dorf will give two public lectures. His first lecture, 
"Recent Trends in the Orthodox View of the Church" 
will be delivered at 8 :00 p.m. on Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 20th. His second lecture, "Protestantism, 
Orthodoxy, and the Ecumenical Movement" will be 
given at 4 :00 p.m. on Thursday, November 21st. The 
University Community is cordially invited. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
FACULTY CLUB SQUARE DANCE 

The Faculty Club will sponsor a Folk and Square 
Dance Party in the Woman's College gymnasium on 
Thursday, November 21st, at 8 :15 p.m. It is not 
necessary to have a partner to attend. All f acuity and 
staff members will be welcome. 



[5] 



BATTLESHIP USS NORTH CAROLINA 

Duke University and the U. S. Navy Department 
will present to the State of North Carolina an exact 
replica of the battleship USS North Carolina during 
half time ceremonies at the Duke-Navy football game 
on Saturday, November 16th. The scale model, eight 
feet long and valued at $15,000, has been at Duke in 
the custody of the NROTC Unit for the past fifteen 
years. 

Dignitaries taking part in the ceremony will 
include Dr. Douglas M. Knight, Governor Terry 
Sanford, Admiral D. L. McDonald, Chief of Naval 
Operations, Rear Admiral C. C. Kirkpatrick, Superin- 
tendent of the U. S. Naval Academy, Rear Admiral 
L. R. Daspit, Commandant of the Sixth Naval 
District and Rear Admiral R. B. Ellis (Retired) and 
Mr. Hugh Morton of the State Battleship Commission. 

Dr. Knight will state the purpose of the occasion 
and introduce the dignitaries. The battleship will be 
brought on the field by a mechanical mule and will be 
accompanied by an honor guard and color guard of 
Duke University NROTC midshipmen. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

"BLACK WATCH" TO APPEAR IN 

INDOOR STADIUM 

On Tuesday, November 19th at 8 :15 p.m. the 
Regimental Band and Massed Pipers of the Black 
Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) with Highland 
Dancers from the Edinburgh Festival, will appear 
in the Indoor Stadium under the auspices of the 
Artists Series. 

Trumpet fanfares, rumbling drains and the stirring- 
skirl of the Massed Pipers launches the brilliant and 
moving spectacle of marching ceremonies, rousing 
music and highland dancing which this world-famous 
regiment brings to North America. 

Tickets priced at $2.50 and $2.00 for adults and 
$1.25 and $1.00 for children are on sale in Room 
202-A Flowers Building or write to Box KM, Duke 
Station (enclose self -addressed stamped envelope). 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 

There will be no meeting of the Undergraduate 
Faculty Council in November. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY EXCEEDS 
UNITED FUND GOAL 

Duke University has once again exceeded its goal 
as established for the Durham United Fund Cam- 
paign of 1963. The University's quota in this year's 
effort was $40,000. Members of the Duke University 
community have pledged $41,979.73. The Durham 
Campaign has not reached its goal; therefore, it is 
requested that those who have not made their pledge 
return it to Room 121 of the Engineering Building. 



ART EXHIBITION 



On view until November 19th in the Gallery of the 
Woman's College Library is a loan exhibition of 
American Paintings from the collection of Mr. Harry 
L. Dalton of Charlotte, North Carolina. Mr. Dalton, 
whose private collection of works of art, numbers some 
three hundred items, is an alumnus of Duke, Class of 
1916. Since that time he has pursued a notably 
successful career in the world of business and finance. 
It is a measure of Mr. Dalton 's activity that, despite 
his official retirement, he still serves as a director of 
some three dozen corporations. It is in his "spare 
time" that he follows his interest in collecting and 
oversees his philanthropic activities in connection with 
art programs and art centers in a number of colleges 
and universities. 

The current exhibition is drawn from the Ameri- 
can portion of Mr. Dalton 's collection and the works 
included range in date over the last century and a 
half, as represented by such noted painters as Eakins, 
Sully, Sargent, Inness and members of the Eight. 
Later it is hoped that the European portions of his 
collection may be shown. Under the joint auspices 
of the Department of Art and the Student Union all 
exhibitions are open to the public without charge. 



SUMMER PLACEMENT REGISTRATION 

It is important that all Duke undergraduate and 
graduate students stop by the Summer Placement 
Office in Room 212 Flowers Building, if they are in- 
terested in registering for summer work. Requests 
for summer personnel, both technical and non-techni- 
cal, are received every day, and only by completing 
the registration form can students indicate their 
availability for consideration. Office hours are posted 
on the door, or appointments can be made to see Mr. 
Robert Detweiler, Director of Summer Placement, in 
Room 214 Flowers Building. 



WEEK OF 



Nov. 17-23, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Nov. 17-23, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, November 17 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. John G. Simpson, 
Student Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 
Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. McMurry 
S. Richey, Associate Professor of Theology and 
Christian Nurture, The Divinity School. 
Sermon: "A Charitable Man Is the True Lover 
of God. ' ' Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC 
and WDNC-FM. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Music Student Recitals. 
Music Room East Duke Building. 

7:30 p.m. Diwali Celebrations: India's Festival of 
Lights. Auditorium of Biological Sciences 
Building. 



Monday, November 18 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Professor 
Morley Kare. Auditorium of Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
8:15 p.m. An Evening With Iain Hamilton. Music 
Room East Duke Building. 



8:15 p.m. CORE 
Building. 



Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 



Tuesday, November 19 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Professor W. D. White. 
12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 

Room 208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 

Card Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Artists Series presents the "Black 

Watch. ' ' Indoor Stadium. 

Wednesday, November 20 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Thomas E. McCollough. 

3:30 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. 
Zing- Yang Kuo. Room 130 Building 9. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Elsie 
Quarterman. Auditorium of Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 

4:30 p.m. Joint Duke-U. N. C. Physics Colloquium. 

Speaker: Professor Bernard Cohen. Room 

265 Phillips Hall, U. N. C. Chapel Hill, N. C. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "A Day at the Paces," with the 
Marx Brothers — Groucho — Harpo — Chico, 
Allan Jones, and Maureen 'Sullivan. 

8:00 p.m. Department of Religion Lecture. Speaker: 
Dr. John A. Meyendorf. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Young Artists Series 
presents Susan Starr. Music Room, East Duke 
Building. 

Thursday, November 21 

10:00 a.m. Newcomers' Club Meeting. Speaker: 
Camilla R. Bittle. 3106 Devon Road, Hope 
VaUey. 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. Evan 6. Snodgrass, II. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
William P. Jencks. Room M-204 Medical 
Center. 

4:00 p.m. Graduate Faculty Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Religion Lecture. Speaker: 
Dr. John A. Meyendorf. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

4:30 p.m. Gallery Coffee Honoring Robert M. 
Broderson. Alumni Lounge. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
facility, staff members, and students. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

6:30 p.m. Pi Sigma Alpha presents Dr. Wladyslaw 
W. Kulski. Room 204 East Duke Building. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 
Page Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. "West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

8:15 p.m. Faculty Club Square Dance. "Woman's 
College Gvrnnasium. 



Friday, November 22 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. McMurry S. Richey, Mr. B. S. McKinley. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 
Coombs Field. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Concert. 
Conductor: Allan Bone. Page Auditorium. 



2:00 



7:00 



Saturday, November 23 

p.m. Varsity Football : Duke versus University 
of North Carolina. Stadium. Student Union 
Open House following Game. Union Ballroom. 
and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "A Day at the Races," with the 
Marx Brothers — Groucho — Harpo — Chico, 
Allan Jones, and Maureen O 'Sullivan. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Friday, Center, 6:15 
P.M., Supper followed by worship and seminars. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER: Sunday (Trinity XXIII), 
9:30 A.M., Center, Holy Communion; 6:15 P.M., 
Center, Evensong. Monday, 7 .-00 P.M., Evenings of 
Dialogue; 8:30 P.M., Lav Readers' and Acolytes' 
Class. Wednesday, 7 :10 A.M. and 5 :30 P.M., Holy 
Communion. Friday, 3 :15 P.M., Seminar on Or- 
thodoxy (Dr. Bush). 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: There will 
be no meeting this week because of the N.C.-Tenn. 
LSA Conference at Lenoir Rhyne in Hickory, N. C. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9 :00 A.M., Center, 
Freshman Forum. Snack Breakfast and Discussion of 
"No Exit" by Jean Paul Sartre (the first in a series of 
discussions of religious insights in contemporary 
literature) ; 5:30 P.M., Center, Congregational Meal. 
Tuesday, 7:00 P.M.. Center, Seminar on "The Mean- 
ing of Freedom." Thursday, 9:00 P.M., Men's 
Graduate Center, Seminar on "Contemporary Criti- 
cisms of Christianity." 

On Sunday, November 24, Wesley Players will 
present a chancel drama. Impromptu, by Tad Mosel, 
at the service of Evening Prayer at 6 :00 P.M. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: 
Sunday, 5:30 P.M., home of Dr. and Mrs. Richard 
Goodling on Farrington Road. The group will discuss 
chapters 1 and 2 of Bishop J. A. T. Robinson's book, 
Honest to God. Transportation will leave the Chapel 
steps, the East Campus circle and Hanes House at 
5 :15 P.M. Thursday, 12 :40 P.M., Luncheon at Gilbert- 
Addoms Dining Hall on East Campus. 

WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 6:15 
P.M., Center, Vespers followed by Coffee Hour and 
Discussion. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. McMurry S. Richey, Associate 
Professor of Theology and Christian Nurture, The 
Divinity School, will deliver the sermon at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, 
November 17th, in the Universitv Chapel. His subject 
will be "A Charitable Man Is the True Lover of God." 
The order of worship follows : 



[2] 



Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University 
Lector: Mr. James T. 'Keller, Jr., President, Young Men's 

Christian Association 
Opening Organ Voluntary — 

Kleine Praludien und Intermezzi Hermann Sehroeder 

Choral Call to Worship — "The Lord Is in His Holy Temple" 

Calvin W. Laufer 
Hymn — "O Worship the King" 

Adapted from Johann M. Haydn 
The Prayer of Adoration 
The Lord's Prayer 
Anthem— "My Shepherd Will Supply My Need" 

Virgil Thomson 
Scripture Lesson — I John 4:7-21 

Hymn — ' ' Faith of Our Fathers ! ' ' Henri F. Hemy 

Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayer of Confession, Thanksgiving, Intercession, 

Petition and Dedication 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem— "And He Shall Purify" from The Messiah 

George Handel 

Response — The Doxology 

Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — ' ' A Charitable Man Is the True Lover of God ' ' 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Sevenfold Amen" John Stainer 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Sketch in C Major 

"Robert Schumann 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, Novemher 24th, is the Reverend Dr. Howard 
C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC STUDENT RECITALS 

The Department of Music will present the first in 
a series of student recitals on Sunday, November 17th 
at 4:00 p.m in the Music Room East Duke Building. 
The University Community is cordially invited to at- 
tend. The program will be as follows : 

Allemande, from French Suite No. 3 in B Minor Bach 

Janice Bay, Piano 
Sonata for Viola in G Major Benedetto Marcello 

Andante 
Allegro 
Grave 
Allegro 

Larry Cobb, Viola Ruth Friedberg, Piano 
Sonata in D Major, K.576 Mozart 

First movement: Allegro 

John Ruggero, Piano 
Non piu andrai (The Marriage of Figaro) Mozart 

Du bist die Ruh' Schubert 

Ronald Steed, Baritone Ruth Friedberg, Piano 
Solo de Concours A. Messager 

James Oliver, Clarinet Billie Godwin, Piano 

Toccata in G Major Bach 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Fugue 

Lydia Cantrell, Piano 
Sonata for Flute and Piano Poulenc 

Allegro Malineolico 
Cantilena 
Presto giocoso 

Nancy Githens, Flute Ruth Friedberg, Piano 

TJn moto di gioja (The Marriage of Figaro) Mozart 

Porgi amor (The Marriage of Figaro) Mozart 

Sure on this shining night (Agee) Samuel Barber 

Marjorie Randolph, Soprano Ruth Friedberg, Piano 



DIWALI CELEBRATIONS 

"Diwali," India's Festival of Lights, will be 
celebrated on Sunday evening, November 17th at 
7:30 p.m. in the Auditorium of the Biological Sci- 
ences Building. The program will include a showing 
of Indian documentary films, a talk by Dr. R. K. Rao, 
and Indian refreshments. A cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to all interested persons. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 



The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, November 18th at 4 :15 p.m. in 
the Auditorium of the Biological Sciences Building. 
Professor Morley Kare, Laboratory for Sensory Physi- 
ology, North Carolina State College will speak on 
"Comparative Aspects of the Sense of Taste." Coffee 
and tea will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



AN EVENING WITH IAIN HAMILTON 

The Department of Music will present the second 
in the series of "Five Evenings With Iain Hamilton" 
on Monday, November 18th at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music 
Room, East Duke Building. Mr. Hamilton, Mary 
Duke Biddle Professor of Music, will speak of "The 
Music of Luigi Dallapiccola." A predominantly 
vocal composer, Dallapiccola is one of the leading 
Italian composers of today. Now in his fifties he 
ranks among the very finest of European composers. 
He is not only a vital composer of today but also one 
of the greatest vocal composers of the century. His 
predominantly vocal output ranges from the opera, 
"The Prisoner," and several large-scale choral and 
orchestral works such as "The Songs of Freedom" 
and "Job," to many short works for voice and small 
instrumental groups such as the Gothe Lieder, the 
Sappho Fragments and the Machado Songs. In this 
program Mr. Hamilton will deal with his work as a 
whole and illustrate his development from a composer 
with a tonal language to one using a highly individual 
serial technique. 

The following works will be illustrated in perform- 
ance: 

Tartiniana Seconds for Violin and Piano 

Joseph Pepper, Violinist 

Loren Withers, Pianist 

Quaderno Musicale 

Loren Withers, Pianist 

Selected additional musical examples will be drawn from 

recorded performance. 

The University Community and the general public 
are cordially invited to attend. 



CORE MEETING 



There will be a meeting of CORE on Monday, 
November 18th, at 8 :15 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building, for the purpose of electing officers. Nomi- 
nations should be turned in to the Executive Com- 
mittee by Sunday night, November 17th. 



[3] 



"BLACK WATCH" PERFORMANCE 
IN INDOOR STADIUM 

The Regimental Band and Massed Pipers of the 
Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) with High- 
land Dancers from the Edinburgh Festival, on their 
second tonr of North America, will appear on Tuesday, 
November 19th at 8 :15 p.m. in the Indoor Stadium 
under the auspices of the Artists Series. 

The Black Watch, of 100 members, has had an 
historic career dating back to the early 18th century 
when each glen had its fierce fighting men, owing 
allegiance to some chieftain; one of the MacDonalds 
could raise 500 men overnight and the Stewarts could 
summon upwards of a thousand armed and ready to 
fight anybody or anything. 

In 1724, King George I appointed a new eom- 
mander-in-chief in Scotland, and Irishman, General 
George Wade, and in 1725 six companies were formed, 
three large and three small, numbering about 500 men. 
Stationed in small groups throughout the Highlands, 
acting as a police force preventing elan fights and 
plots against the government, they became known as 
the Black Watch because of the late hours they kept in 
keeping a vigil over the land and because of the dark 
tartans they wore, in contrast to the brilliant red uni- 
forms of General Wade's regular soldiers. Through- 
out the uext couple of centuries, the unit distinguished 
itself at battles throughout the world, receiving many 
decorations from grateful and impressed governments. 

Trumpet fanfares, rumbling drums and the stirring 
skirl of the Massed Pipers launches the brilliant and 
moving spectacle of marching ceremonies, rousing 
music and highland dancing which this world-famous 
regiment brings to North America. 

All seats are reserved and tickets are priced at 
$2.50 and $2.00 for adults and $1.25 and $1.00 for 
children. They can be purchased in Room 202-A 
Flowers Building or call Extension 2911. 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. Zing- Yang Kuo, Dorothea Dix Hospital, 
Raleigh, will speak in Room 130 Building 9 on 
Wednesday, November 20th at 3 :30 p.m. The subject 
of Dr. Kuo's address will be "Looking Back at 
Instincts." 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
November 20th at 4 :15 P.M. in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building, West Campus. Dr. 
Elsie Quarterman will speak on "Problems in the 
Autecology of Bryophytes." 

Dr. Quarterman, Associate Professor of Biology, 
Vanderbilt University, did her graduate work in 
Botany at Duke U/niversity. Her research on the 
ecology of both bryophytes and vascular plants has 
taken her to all parts of the Southeastern States. 
Her present work deals with causes of endemism in 
species of Lesquerella. 

Refreshments will be served in the fover at 4:00 
P.M. 



JOINT DUKE-U.N.C. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM 

The Joint Duke-U.N.C. Physics Colloquium will 
meet Wednesday, November 20th at 4:30 p.m. at the 
University of North Carolina, Room 265 Phillips Hall. 
The speaker will be Professor Bernard Cohen who will 
speak on the topic "Nuclear Structure Studies with 
Stripping Reaction. ' ' 



DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION LECTURES 

The Religion Department will present Dr. John A. 
Meyendorf, Professor of Church History, St. Vladi- 
mir's Orthodox Theological Seminary in New York 
State, on Wednesday and Thursday, November 20th 
and 21st in Room 208 Flowers Building. Dr. Meyen- 
dorf will give two public lectures. His first lecture. 
"Recent Trends in the Orthodox View of the Church" 
will be delivered at 8 :00 p.m. on Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 20th. His second lecture, "Protestantism, 
Orthodoxy, and the Ecumenical Movement" will be 
given at 4 :00 p.m. on Thursday, November 21st. The 
University Community is cordially invited. 



Bach 



S. U. YOUNG ARTIST SERIES PRESENTS 
SUSAN STARR 

The Student Union Young Artists Series will 
present a piano recital by Susan Starr on Wednesday, 
November 20th at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room East 
Duke Building. An internationally known young 
pianist, and a 1962 winner of the second prize of the 
piano division of the International Tchaikovsky 
Competition in Moscow, Miss Starr has performed 
widely in both this country and in Europe. An in- 
formal reception will follow in the East Duke Parlors. 
There will be no admission fee. Her program will be 
as follows : 

French Suite No. 5 in G Major 

Allemande 

Courante 

Sarabande 

Gavotte 

Bourree 

Loure 

Gigue 
Sonata in C Minor, Opus 13 (Sonata Pathetique) 

Graven — Allegro di molto e eon brio 

Adagio Cantabile 

Rondo: Allegro 
Prelude and Toccata 

Intermission 
Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Opus 23 
Phantasiestiicke, Opus 12 

Des Abends 

Aufschwung 

Warum? 

Grillen 

In der Nacht 

Fabel 

Traumes-Wirren 

Ende vom Lied 
Grand Etude No. 6 in A Minor after Paganini 



Beethoven 



Pirumov 

Chopin 
Schumann 



Liszt 



NEWCOMERS' CLUB MEETING 

The Newcomers' Club will meet on Thursday, 
November 21st at 10:00 a.m. at the home of Mrs. 
Lionel Stevenson, 3106 Devon Road, Hope Valley. 
The speaker will be Camilla R. Bittle, Author. 



[4] 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, November 21st at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
M-204 Medical Center. Dr. William P. Jeneks, 
Graduate Department of Biochemistry, Brandeis Uni- 
versity, will speak on "The Effect of Denaturing 
Agents and Salts on Proteins and Model Compounds." 



GRADUATE FACULTY MEETING 

The Graduate Faculty will meet on Thursday, 
November 21st at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 



ROBERT M. BRODERSON ART EXHIBITION 

The Student Union and the Department of Art are 
sponsoring jointly an exhibition of recent works by 
Robert M. Broderson. The exhibition which will run 
from Thursday, November 21st through Sunday, De- 
cember 15th is in two sections : paintings will be dis- 
played in the Gallery of the Woman 's College Library, 
East Campus, and drawings and lithographs will fill 
the Alumni Lounge Gallery of the Union Building of 
West Campus. 

Mr. Broderson is a well known figure on campus, 
being an Associate Professor in the Art Department 
and Director of its studio program. His career as a 
professional artist began even before he received his 
Bachelor of Arts from Duke in 1950. Over the last 
15 years, his works have been shown and have received 
awards in innumerable regional and national exhibi- 
tions including frequent one man shows in New York 
and elsewhere. His work, reproductions of which have 
appeared in leading art periodicals, have entered 
many private collections and such public collections as 
the Whitney Museum in New York, the Wadsworth 
Apheneum in Hartford, and the University Museum at 
Princeton. The Duke University Press will publish 
in the Spring of 1964 a volume devoted to his 
drawings. 

GALLERY COFFEE 

Students, faculty, and members of the community 
will have an opportunity to meet the artist, or to re- 
new their acquaintance with him, at an informal 
Gallery Coffee in the Alumni Lounge next Thursday 
afternoon, November 21st between the hours of 4:30 
and 5:30 p.m. and are extended a cordial invitation 
by the host group, the Student Union Fine Arts 
Committee. 



PI SIGMA ALPHA PRESENTS 
DR. W. W. KULSKI 

Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honorary 
organization, will meet on Thursday, November 21st 
at 6 :30 p.m. in Room 204 East Duke Building. Dr. 
Wladyslaw W. Kulski will speak on "The Coalition 
Crisis." Dr. Kulski, recently appointed visiting 



James B. Duke Professor of Russian Affairs, was the 
Polish negotiator in London, England of the British- 
Polish Treaty of Mutual Assistance in 1939 which 
was the diplomatic basis for Great Britain's declara- 
tion of war on Nazi Germany when Hitler's troops 
marched into Poland, Dr. Kulski 's homeland. He 
served in a number of important capacities while with 
the Polish diplomatic service from 1928 to 1945. Dr. 
Kulski participated in the League of Nations as a legal 
and political expert. His books include: "Problems 
of International Security," "The Soviet Regime, 
Communism in Practice," "Peaceful Coexistence: An 
Analysis of Soviet Foreign Policy," and "Germany 
from Defeat to Conquest." A question and answer 
period will follow. All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 



FACULTY CLUB SQUARE DANCE 

The Faculty Club will sponsor a Folk and Square 
Dance Party in the Woman's College gymnasium on 
Thursday, November 21st, at 8 :15 p.m. It is not 
necessary to have a partner to attend. All faculty and 
staff members will be welcome. 



DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

The Department of Music will present the fall con- 
cert of the Duke Symphony Orchestra on Friday, 
November 22nd at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 
Allan Bone will conduct. Featured on the program 
will be guest pianist, Susan Starr, who will perform 
with the Orchestra the "Concerto No. 4 in G Major for 
Piano and Orchestra, Opus 58" by Beethoven. Miss 
Starr is an internationally known young pianist and 
the winner in 1962 of the International Tchaikovsky 
Competition in Moscow, and has performed exten- 
sively both here and abroad. 

Admission will be the presentation of a Duke 
Symphony Orchestra season ticket or the purchase of 
a one dollar ticket at the door. Advance ticket sales 
will be in Room 106 Asbury Building at fifty cents 
each. 

The program will be as follows : 
Toccata (Adagio) and Fugue in C Major 
Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Opus 93 
Allegro vivace e eon brio 
Allegretto seherzando* 
Tempo di Menuetto 
Allegro vivace 

Intermission 
Concerto No. 4 in G Major for Piano and Orchestra, Opus 58 

Beethoven 
Allegro moderato 
Andante con moto 
Rondo: Vivace 

Susan Starr, Soloist 
Variations, Chaconne and Finale (1948) Norman Dello Joio 



Bach-Weiner 
Beethoven 



ART EXHIBITION 

On view until November 19th in the Gallery of the 
Woman's College Library is a loan exhibition of 
American Paintings from the collection of Mr. Harry 
L. Dalton of Charlotte, North Carolina. Mr. Dalton, 



[5] 



whose private collection of works of art, numbers some 
three hundred items, is an alumnus of Duke, Class of 
1916. Since that time he has pursued a notably 
successful career in the world of business and finance. 
It is a measure of Mr. Dalton's activity that, despite 
his official retirement, he still serves as a director of 
some three dozen corporations. It is in his "spare 
time" that he follows his interest in collecting and 
oversees his philanthropic activities in connection with 
art programs and art centers in a number of colleges 
and universities. 

The current exhibition is drawn from the Ameri- 
can portion of Mr. Dalton's collection and the works 
included range in date over the last century and a 
half, as represented by such noted painters as Eakins, 
Sully, Sargent, Inness and members of the Eight. 
Later it is hoped that the European portions of his 
collection may be shown. Under the joint auspices 
of the Department of Art and the Student Union all 
exhibitions are open to the public without charge. 

Also on display until Tuesday, November 19th in 
the Gallery of the Alumni Lounge, West Union Build- 
ing, an exhibition may be seen of the Graphic Art of 
Rudy Pozzatti, distinguished American Artist. The 
showing is under the auspices of the Student Union 
and is on loan from the Jane Haslem Gallery in 
Chapel Hill. The recipient of numerous major 
awards, Mr. Pozzatti has a wide reputation in Europe 
as well as ,in America. His work is represented iu 
major public and private collections both here and 
abroad including The Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts ; The Library of Congress, The Museum 
of Modern Art, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, 
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and The Art Insti- 
tute of Chicago. 

The works on exhibition include a selection of 
woodcuts, etchings, lithographs and engravings by 
this talented young artist. 



DINING HALL ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Duke University Dining Halls will serve the 
traditional Thanksgiving Day buffet from 5 :00 to 
7 :00 p.m. in the University Room. Since the event 
has become so popular with those students who must 
remain on campus during the holiday period, we have 
reduced the cost of the Oak Room dinner by fifty 
cents, where the same menu is offered and encourage 
families to use the Oak Room so they may be served 
more leisurely. 



DUKE CHRONICLE CIRCULATION 

Copies of the Duke Chronicle are being left in 
Allen Building, West Library, East Duke and West 
Duke for the convenience of interested faculty mem- 
bers. 



HOSPITALITY FOR 
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

The Duke National Students Association is spon- 
soring a program to allow as many International 
Students as possible to eat Thanksgiving Dinner with 
a member of the Faculty. If you are interested in 
participating, contact 207-A Flowers Building, ext. 
2767. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY 

AND THE TRIANGLE SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

The Durham Civic Choral Society and the Triangle 
Symphony Orchestra will perform Puccini's Messa 
di Gloria 'and Bach's Cantata 150 ("Lord, to Thee") 
on Monday, November 25th, at 8 :15 p.m. in the 
Woman's College Auditorium. The concert will be 
conducted by Dr. Paul Bryan. John Hanks will sing 
the tenor solos. The entire Duke Community is in- 
vited, and admission is free. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

11TH ANNUAL CEREBRAL PALSY 

FOOTBALL CLASSIC 

Thanksgiving Day, November 28th 

Duke-Maryland Freshmen Game, 2:00 p.m. 

Preceded by Midget Game at 12:00 

Advance Tickets, $1.00 

Gate Tickets, $1.50 

Gate Prize: Glasspar boat, Evinrude motor, 

and trailer: Courtesy, London Marina 

Sponsored by the Durham Cerebral Palsy Foundation 

and the Durham Junior League 

All proceeds from this game will be used for im- 
provements and comforts for the children from all over 
the state at the North Carolina Cerebral Palsy Hos- 
pital and School in Durham, and for projects for the 
children of Durham such as the Children's Museum, 
Allied Arts, Boys' Club, playgrounds in underprivi- 
ledged areas, and programs in all the schools of Dur- 
ham City and County. 



WEEK OF 



Nov. 24-30, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Nov. 24-30, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, November 24 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. John G. Simpson, 
Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the Uni- 
versity. Sermon: "Savonarola in the Duke 
Chapel." Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC 
and WDNC-FM. 



Monday, November 25 



2:00 



4:15 



p.m. The final examination of Mr. Tyler 
Deierhoi for the Ph.D. degree in History. 
Library Conference Room, 
p.m. Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Don W. 
Hayne. Auditorium Biological Sciences Build- 
ing. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
facility, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:00 p.m. Y.W.C.A. Open Forum. Speaker: 
Norman Whitney. Music Room, East Duke 
Building. 

8:15 p.m. Durham Civic Choral Society Fall Con- 
cert. Woman's College Auditorium. 

Tuesday, November 26 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor M. Wilson Nesbitt. 



12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
1:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Michael 

Bassett for the Ph.D. degree in History. Room 

235 Allen Building. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Miss M. Clelia 

Ganoza for the Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry. 

Room 1537 Gerontology Building. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Donald S. Burdick. Room 114 Physics Build- 
ing. 
4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Speaker: 

Dean Barnes Woodhall. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 

Room 208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:30 p.m. Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship Meet- 
ing. Speaker: Reverend Jim Raines. Music 

Room East Duke Building. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 

Card Gymnasium. 

Wednesday, November 27 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Holy Communion. Professor M. Wilson Xes- 

bitt. Celebrant. 
12 :30 p.m. Beginning of Thanksgiving Recess. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Tuesday, Extension 2911. 



2:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. David C. 

Rorer for the Ph.D. degree in Physics. Room 

218 Physics Building. 
4:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. L. Douglas 

DeNike for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology. 

Room 222 Psychology, Sociology Building. 

NOTE : No Quadrangle Pictures will be shown 

this week. 

Thursday, November 28 

9:30 a.m. Thanksgiving Day Holy Communion. 
Episcopal University Center, Alexander 
Avenue. 

2:00 p.m. Cerebral Palsy Football Classic. Duke 
versus Maryland Freshmen. Stadium. 

5:00-7:00 p.m. Thanksgiving Day Buffet. Uni- 
versity Room and Oak Room. West Campus. 

5:30-6:15 p.m. Thanksgiving Dinner. Gilbert- 
Addoms Dining Room. East Campus. 

Friday, November 29 

5:30-6:15 p.m. Buffet Dinner. Gilbert- Addoms 
Dining Room. 

Saturday, November 30 

NOTE : No Quadrangle Pictures will be shown 
this week. 
8:15 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke versus Penn 
State. Indoor Stadium. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Friday, December 6, 
Center, Participants and leader for Pearl Lagoon 
aspect of Project Nicaragua will show slides and dis- 
cuss the project — past, present and future. Any 
prospective participants for next summer are urged to 
attend. Supper at 6 :15 P.M., program at 7 :00. 
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 
EPISCOPAL CENTER: Sunday, 9:30 A.M., Chapel 
of St. Michael at the Center, Holy Communion; 6:15 
P.M., Center, Evensong. Monday, 7 :00 P.M., Center, 
Evenings of Dialogue. Wednesday, 7 :10 A.M., Chapel 
of St. Michael, Holy Communion (no afternoon serv- 
ice). 

There will be a Thanksgiving Day Service of Holy 
Communion for the University at the Episcopal Cen- 
ter at 9 :30 A.M. All members of the University 
community are invited to participate. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Sunday, 
6:00 P.M., Grace Lutheran Church, 824 Buchanan 
Blvd., Supper Meeting — Evening of Fellowship is 
planned. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9 : 00 A.M., Center, 
Freshman Forum, Snack Breakfast and Discussion of 



Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot; 6:00 P.M., 
Center, Evening Prayer. The contemporary Word 
will be a chancel drama, Impromptu by Tad Mosel. A 
discussion of the play will follow the service. Tues- 
day, 7 :00 P.M., Center, Seminar on "The Meaning of 
Freedom." The Thursday seminar, " Contemporary 
Criticisms of Christianity," will not meet this week. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: 
Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., home of Mr. and Mrs. John Carey, 
2209 Morehead Avenue. The program for the evening 
will be a discussion of chapter 2 of John A. T. 
Robinson's book, Honest to God. Transportation will 
leave the Chapel steps, the East Campus circle and 
Hanes House at 5:15 P.M. Thursday, 12:40 P.M., 
Luncheon at Gilbert-Addoms Dining Hall on East. 
Campus. 

WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 5:30 
P.M., Westminster House, Vespers and a Buffet Sup- 
per. Rev. Charles Williams will lead a discussion 
after supper. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain 
to the University, will deliver the sermon at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, 
November 24th in the University Chapel. His subject 
will be "Savonarola in the Duke Chapel." The order 
of worship follows: 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, 

Dean of the Chapel 
Lector : The Reverend William R. Patton, Chaplain to Lutheran 

Students 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Kleine Praludien and 

Intermezzi Hermann Schroeder 

Choral Call to Worship—' ' The Lord Is in His Holy 

Temple" Calvin W. Laufer 

Hymn — ' ' O For A Thousand Tongues To Sing ' ' Carl G. Glaser 
The Prayer of Adoration 
The Lord's Prayer 
Anthem — ' ' Creation ' ' from Three Fuging Tunes 

William Billings 
Scripture Lesson — I Corinthians 6 (selected verses) 
Hymn — ' ' The Church 's One Foundation ' ' Samuel S. Wesley 
Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayer of Confession, Thanksgiving, Intercession, 

Petition, and Dedication 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "Be Olad Then, America" from Three 

Fuging Tunes William Billings 

Response — The Doxology 

Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — "Savonarola in the Duke Chapel" 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Sevenfold Amen" John Stainer 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Sketch in C Major 

Robert Schumann 

The regular University Service of Worship will 
not be held in Duke Chapel next Sunday, December 
1st, due to the Thanksgiving academic recess. In- 
stead, there will be a thirty minute service of organ 
music, Scripture readings and pravers, beginning at 
11 :00 a.m. 



[2] 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Tyler Deierhoi for 
the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Monday, 
November 25th at 2 :00 p.m. in the Library Con- 
ference Room. The subject of Mr. Deierhoi 's disserta-> 
tion is ' ' The Conduct of German Policy at the General 
Disarmament Conference of 1932." The committee 
to conduct the examination consists of Professors Joel 
Colton, William B. Hamilton, William E. Scott, 
Richard L. Watson, and Robert S. Rogers. Professor 
Colton will preside. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 



The Zoology Department will hold its weekly semi- 
nar on Monday, November 25th at 4 :15 p.m. in the 
Auditorium of the Biological Sciences Building. Dr. 
Don W. Hayne, Institute of Statistics, North Carolina 
State College will speak on "Experimentation in Field 
Ecology." Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer. 



DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY 
FALL CONCERT 

The Durham Civic Choral Society will present its 
15th annual fall concert on Monday, November 25th 
at 8:15 p.m. in Woman's College Auditorium. The 
program, under the direction of Paul Bryan, will 
feature John Hanks as soloist. The public is cordially 
invited to attend and admission is free. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Michael Bassett for 
the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Tuesday, 
November 26th at 1:30 p.m. in Room 235 Allen 
Building. The subject of Mr. Bassett 's dissertation is 
' ' The Socialist Party of America, 1912-1919 : Years of 
Decline." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Richard L. Watson, Jr., William 
B. Hamilton, Harold T. Parker, Robert F. Durden and 
John H. Hallowell. Professor Watson will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Miss M. Clelia Ganoza for 
the Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry will be held on 
Tuesday, November 26th at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 1537 
Gerontology Building. The subject of Miss Ganoza 's 
dissertation is "The Role of Lipid in Glucose-6- 
Phosphatase. " The committee to conduct the exami- 
nation consists of Professors William L. Byrne, Ron- 
ald C. Greene, William S. Lynn, Jack L. Kostyo, and 
John H. Saylor. Professor Byrne will preside. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council which normally meets on 
the fourth Thursday of each month, will hold its 
meeting on Tuesday, November 26th at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 208 Flowers Building due to the Thanksgiving 
Recess. Dean Barnes Woodhall will speak to the 
group about some of the long-range plans of the' 
Medical Center. 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 

The Mathematics Department will hold a seminar 
on Tuesday, November 26th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
114 Physics Building. Dr. Donald S. Burdick will 
speak on "Testing Similarity of Linked Observa- 
tions." Coffee will be served in Room 120 Physics 
Building at 3 :30 p.m. 



INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN 
FELLOWSHIP MEETING 

The Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship will meet 
on Tuesday, November 26th at 6 :30 p.m. in the Music 
Room East Duke Building. Reverend Jim Raines will 
speak on "Casual Christian — A Contradiction." 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David C. Rorer for 
the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held on Wednes- 
day, November 27th at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 218 Physics 
Building. The subject of Mr. Rorer 's dissertation is 
"Thermodynamic Properties of Superconducting and 
Normal Molybdenum. ' ' The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Horst Meyer, 
Henry A. Fairbank, A. B. Harris, Walter Gordy, 
and T. M. Gallic Professor Meyer will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. L. Douglas DeNike 
for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held on 
Wednesday, November 27th at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 222 
Psychology-Sociology Building. The subject of Mr. 
DeNike 's dissertation is "Awareness in Verbal Con- 
ditioning: The Assessment of Awareness from Verbal 
Keports Written by Subjects During Conditioning." 
The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors C. D. Spielberger, C. A. Boneau, Norman 
Guttman, Alan Kerckhoff, and K. E. Zener. Professor 
Spielberger will preside. 



THANKSGIVING DAY HOLY COMMUNION 

There will be a Thanksgiving Day Service of Holy 
Communion at the Episcopal University Center on 
Alexander Avenue. The service will be at 9 :30 a.m. 
on Thursday morning and all members of the Uni- 
versity Community are cordially invited to partici- 
pate. 



[3 



11TH ANNUAL CEREBRAL PALSY 

FOOTBALL CLASSIC 

Thanksgiving Day, November 28th 

Duke-Maryland Freshmen Game, 2:00 p.m. 

Preceded by Midget Game at 12:00 

Advance Tickets, $1.00 

Gate Tickets, $1.50 

Gate Prize: Glasspar boat, Evinrude motor, 

and trailer: Courtesy, London Marina 

Sponsored by the Durham Cerebral Palsy Foundation 

and the Durham Junior League 

All proceeds from this game will be used for im- 
provements and comforts for the children from all over 
the state at the North Carolina Cerebral Palsy Hos- 
pital and School in Durham, and for projects for the 
children of Durham such as the Children's Museum, 
Allied Arts, Boys' Club, playgrounds in underprivi- 
leged areas, and programs in all the schools of Dur- 
ham City and County. 



DINING HALL ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Duke University Dining Halls will serve the 
traditional Thanksgiving Day buffet from 5:00 to 
7 :00 p.m. in the University Room. Since the event 
has become so popular with those students who must 
remain on campus during the holiday period, we have 
reduced the cost of the Oak Room dinner by fifty 
cents, where the same menu is offered and encourage 
families to use the Oak Room so they may be served 



ROBERT M. BRODERSON ART EXHIBITION 

The Student Union and the Department of Art are 
sponsoring jointly an exhibition of recent works by 
Robert M. Broderson. The exhibition which will run 
through Sunday, December loth is in two sections: 
paintings will be displayed in the Gallery of the 
Woman's College Library, East Campus, and draw- 
ings and lithographs will fill the Alumni Lounge 
Gallery of the Union Building of "West Campus. 

Mr. Broderson is a well known figure on campus, 
being an Associate Professor in the Art Department 
and Director of its studio program. His career as a 
professional artist began even before he received his 
Bachelor of Arts from Duke in 1950. Over the last 
15 years, his works have been shown and have received 
awards in innumerable regional and national exhibi- 
tions including frequent one man shows in New York 
and elsewhere. His work, reproductions of which have 
appeared in leading art periodicals, have entered 
many private collections and such public collections as 
the Whitney Museum in New York, the Wadsworth 
Apheneum in Hartford, and the University Museum at 
Princeton. The Duke University Press will publish 
in the Spring of 1964 a volume devoted to his 
drawings. 



DUKE CHRONICLE CIRCULATION 

Copies of the Duke Chronicle are being left in 
Allen Building, West Library, East Duke and West 
Duke for the convenience of interested facidty mem- 
bers. 



DINING HALLS HOURS- 
THANKSGIVING HOLIDAYS— 1963 

"A" Cafeteria will close after lunch on Tuesday, 
November 26, and reopen for lunch on Monday, 
December 2. 

The Oak Room will close after dinner on Thursday 
night, November 28, and reopen for lunch on Monday, 
December 2. 









Blue 4- 












White 


University 


Oalc 








Room 


Room 


Room 


Wednesday, 














November 


27 












Breakfast 




7 


00- 


9:30 


7:15- 9:15 




Snack Bar 




9 


30-11:00 






Lunch 




11 


:30- 


2:00 


11:00- 1:30 


11:30- 2:00 


Dinner 




(closed) 


5:00- 6:30 


5:00- 7:00 


Thursday, 














November 


28 












Breakfast 










8:00-11:00 




Snack Bar 














Lunch 










11:30- 2:00 


11 :30- 2:00 


Dinner 










5:00- 7:00 
(Buffet) 


5:00- 7:00 
(Candlelight) 


Friday, 














November 


29 












Breakfast 










7:30- 9-30 




Snack Bar 










9:30-11 :00 




Lunch 










11:30- 1:30 




Dinner 










5:00-6:30 


. 


Saturday, 














November 


SO 












Breakfast 










7:30- 9:30 




Snack Bar 










9:30-11:00 




Lunch 










11:30- 1:30 




Dinner 










5:00- 6:20 




Sunday, 












.- 


December 


1 












Breakfast 




8 


:30-ll 






Snack Bar 












- 


Lunch 




11 


30- 


1:30 






Dinner 




5 


00- 


7:00 







LIBRARY HOURS FOR 
THANKSGIVING RECESS 

Thanksgiving Day, November 28th, will be a holi- 
day. All libraries will remain closed. 

The General Library will be o^en and o^eratin^ 
according to the following schedule during the 
Thanksgiving recess : 



Wednesday, November 27 
Thursdav, November 28 
Fridaj', November 29 
Saturday, November 30 
Sunday, December 1 
Monday, December 2 



8:00 n m-T:00 p.m. 

closed 
8:00 a.m. -5 :00 p.m. 
8:00a.m.-l:00 p.m. 

closed 
Resume regular schedule 



Woman's College Library will follow the following 
schedule : 



Wednesday, November 27 
Thursday, November 28 
Friday, November 29 
Saturday, November 30 
Sunday, December 1 
Monday, December 2 



8:00a m-5 :00p.m. 

closed 
9:00 a.m. -5-00 p.m. 
9 :00a.m.-l :00 p.m. 

closed 
Besume regular schedule 



Schedules for other campus libraries will be posted 
in those libraries. 



[4] 



HOSPITALITY FOR 
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

The Duke National Students Association is spon- 
soring a program to allow as many International 
Students as possible to eat Thanksgiving Dinner with 
a member of the Faculty. If you are interested in 
participating, contact 207-A Flowers Building, ext. 
2767. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

DUKE LAW SCHOOL 

LEGISLATIVE REAPPORTIONMENT CLINIC 

On Monday, December 2nd, the Duke Law School 
will present a clinic on legal and practical problems in 
the held of legislative reapportionment. At 10 :00 
a.m., Professor Robert G. Dixon, of the George 
Washington University School of Law, will speak in 
the Law School Court Room on the legal problems cur- 
rently facing the Supreme Court in its efforts to lay 
down a Constitutional standard for legislative ap- 
portionment. At 12 :30 p.m., a luncheon will be held 
in the Men's Graduate Center. Mr. Hugh Cannon, 
Director of the North Carolina State Department of 
Administration, will speak on the practical and politi- 
cal problems encountered in recent efforts to redistrict 
the North Carolina Legislature. All members of the 
Duke University Community are invited to attend both 
sessions of the Clinic. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will have a meeting on Monday, 
December 2nd at 8 :00 p.m. in the Green Room of East 
Duke Building. Professor N. L. Wilson, Associate 
Professor of Philosophy, will speak on "Philosophy 
and Mathematics: Love Affair or Sibling Rivalry?" 
The public is cordially invited to attend. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

STUDENT UNION SPEAKERS SERIES 

SERGE LENTZ ON RED CHINA 

The Student Union Major Speakers Series an- 
nounces the second Major Speaker of the academic 
year; it is Serge Lentz, editor of the Paris Match 
magazine and award winning foreign correspondent. 
Mr. Lentz will address the University Community on 
Monday, December 2nd at 8:15 p.m. in Page Audi- 
torium. His address entitled "Impatient Giant: Red 
China" will concern itself with his recent trip into 
Red China when he spent three weeks traveling in 
and around the sprawling cities of Shanghai, Canton 
and Peking posing as a textile buyer and left the 
Peoples' Republic only after a frightening evening of 
interrogation by two Chinese Secret Service agents. 

Since returning from his saga, Lentz has been the 
object of relentless pursuit from national news media 
in this country. The interest in him is understand- 
able since he is one of a handful of Western journal- 
ists who have gotten into and out of Red China in 



the past decade. C.B.S. television, the Saturday Eve- 
ning Post, Newsweek Magazine and the German and 
European television networks have conducted or ar- 
ranged interviews or features on his unique journey. 
All Student Union Major Speakers addresses are 
open to the public without charge. Opportunities for 
individual questioning is afforded through the ques- 
tion and answer period following the address as well 
as the open informal reception in Flowers Lounge. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER 

The Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater will perform 
Puccini's "Tosca" on Tuesday, December 3rd at 8:15 
p.m. in Page Auditorium under the auspices of the 
Artists Series. 

With a company of fifty including orchestra and 
chorus, Boris Goldovsky presents "Tosca" in Eng- 
lish, fully staged with handsome sets and costumes. 
Puccini's compelling and vital drama, one of the most 
exciting of all Grand Operas, combines some of the 
composer's most memorable arias with a vivid and 
dramatic tale of love, murder, and tragedy. 

Tickets are priced at $2.50 and $2.00 and are avail- 
able in Room 202-A Flowers Building or call exten- 
sion 2911. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

JOSIAH C. TRENT 

MEDICAL HISTORY SOCIETY 

The Josiah C. Trent Medical History Society will 
have a meeting on Wednesday, December 4th at 8 :00 
p.m. in the Rare Book Room of the University Library. 
Professor Weston LaBarre will be the guest speaker. 
His subject will be "Homo Sapiens: Unique Animal." 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ART DEPARTMENT LECTURE 

The Art Department announces a lecture spon- 
sored by The Mary Duke Biddle Foundation on 
Thursday, December 12th at 8:15 p.m. in Room 204 
East Duke Building. Professor Robert Chester Smith, 
Professor of the History of Art, University of Penn- 
sylvania, will speak on "Portuguese Architecture, 
1500-1800." 

In addition, Professor Smith will give an informal 
talk dealing with his latest researches, "History of 
Portuguese Wood Sculpture" on Friday, December 
13th at 11:40 a.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. 
The public and all interested students and faculty are 
cordially invited to attend. 



CALENDAR NOTICES 

It is requested that all information to be run 
in the University Weekly Calendar for December 
1-7 be in to the Calendar Office, 202-A Flowers 
Building by 1 :00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 24th. 



[5] 



WEEK OF 



Dec. 1-7, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Dec. 1-7,1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, December 1 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
11:00-11:30 a.m. University Service of Worship. 
University Chapel. Organ music, Scripture 
readings, and prayers. 

Monday, December 2 

10:00 a.m. Legislative and Reapportionment Clinic. 
Speaker: Professor Robert G. DLson. Law 
School Courtroom. 
12:30 p.m. Legislative and Reapportionment Clinic 
Luncheon. Speaker: Mr. Hugh Cannon. Men's 
Graduate Center. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Professor 
Julius DuBar. Auditorium Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:00 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Speaker: Pro- 
fessor N. L. Wilson. Green Room, East Duke 
Building. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Speakers Series presents 
Serge Lentz. Page Auditorium. Topic : ' ' Im- 
patient Giant: Red China." 



Tuesday, December 3 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Waldo Beach. 



12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 
Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. S. U. Pre-Artist Series Seminar. Music 
Lounge, Flowers Building. Speaker : Mr. John 
Hanks. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 
Card Gymnasium. 

8:15 p.m. Artist Series presents: Goldovsky Grand 
Opera Theater: "Tosca. " Page Auditorium. 

Wednesday, December 4 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Waldo Beach. 

11:00 a.m. Divinity School Lecture. Speaker: Dr. 
Ragnar Bring. York Chapel. 

2:00-4:30 p.m. Physical Therapy and Occupational 
Departments Open House. Rooms 042-45, 
Medical Center. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Speaker: Dr. John W. 
Duffield. Auditorium Biological Sciences 
Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not Utter 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday, Extension 2911. 



6:30-11:00 p.m. Gothic Bookshop Auction. Room 
208 Flowers Building. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. ' ' Billy Budd ' ' with Robert Ryan, 
Peter Ustinov, Melvyn Douglas, and Terence 
Stamp. Herman Melville's exciting master- 
piece in cinemascope. ' ' Magnificent sea story ! ' ' 
— New Yorker Mag. "Vivid, beautiful!" — 
Time Mag. 

8:00 p.m. Josiah C. Trent Medical History Society. 
Speaker: Professor "Weston LaBarre. Rare 
Book Room, University Library. 

Thursday, December 5 

10:00 a.m. Newcomers' Club Christmas Party. 
Y.M.C.A. 515 West Chapel Hill Street. 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Mr. William F. Mahon. 
11:30 a.m. Interplanetary Spacecraft Design Lecture. 

Speaker : Mr. W. J. Schimandle. Lecture Room 

Engineering Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:00 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Fall Initiation. Union 
Ballroom, West Campus. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, December 6 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Waldo Beach and Mr. William E. 
Nickle. 
3 :00 p.m. Economics Public Lecture ; Professor 
W. C. S. Leys. Court Room, Law School 
Building. 

3:00 p.m. Political Science Graduate Seminar. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Speaker: Dean 
Zelman Cowen, Law School, University of 
Melbourne. 

4:00 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
Samuel P. Massie. Room 01 Chemistrv Build- 



ing. 



Rehearsal. 



4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 



8:15 p.m. Music Department Student Voice Recital. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

8:15 p.m. The Creative Arts Festival: "Hansel and 
Gretel. " Page Auditorium. 

9:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m. Hanes House Christmas Dance. 
Elks Club. 

Saturday, December 7 

3:00 p.m. Contemporary Arts Festival: "Hansel 
and Gretel." (Matinee Performance) Page 
Auditorium. 

7:00 and 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. ' ' Billy Budd' ' with Robert Ryan, 
Peter Ustinov, Melvyn Douglas, and Terence 
Stamp. Herman Melville's exciting master- 
piece in cinemascope. ' ' Magnificent sea story ! ' ' 
—New Yorker Mag. "Vivid, beautiful!"— 
Time Mag. 

8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society presents The 
Juilliard String Quartet. Music Room, East 
Duke Building. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The regular University Service of Worship will 
not be held in Duke Chapel this Sunday, December 
1st, due to the Thanksgiving academic recess. In- 
stead, there will be a thirty minute service of organ 
music, Scripture readings and prayers, beginning at 
11 :00 a.m. 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, December 8th is the Reverend Dr. Elfan 
Rees, Geneva, Switzerland. 



DUKE LAW SCHOOL 
LEGISLATIVE REAPPORTIONMENT CLINIC 

On Monday, December 2nd, the Duke Law School 
will present a clinic on legal and practical problems in 
the field of legislative reapportionment. At 10 :00 
a.m., Professor Robert G. Dixon, of the George 
Washington University School of Law, will speak in 
the Law School Court Room on the legal problems cur- 
rently facing the Supreme Court in its efforts to lay 
down a Constitutional standard for legislative ap- 
portionment. At 12 :30 p.m., a luncheon will be held 
in the Men's Graduate Center. Mr. Hugh Cannon, 
Director of the North Carolina State Department of 
Administration, will speak on the practical and politi- 
cal problems encountered in recent efforts to redistrict 
the North Carolina Legislature. All members of the 
Duke University Community are invited to attend both 
sessions of the Clinic. 



[2] 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its seminar 
on Monday, December 2nd at 4:15 p.m. in the Audi- 
torium of the Biological Sciences Building. Professor 
Julius DuBar, Department of Geology, will speak on 
"Neogene Paleoecology of the Southeastern United 
States. ' ' Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 
4:00 p.m. 



ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will have a meeting on Monday, 
December 2nd at 8 :00 p.m. in the Green Room of East 
Duke Building. Professor N. L. Wilson, Associate 
Professor of Philosophy, will speak on "Philosophy 
and Mathematics: Love Affair or Sibling Rivalry?" 
The public is cordially invited to attend. 



STUDENT UNION SPEAKERS SERIES 
SERGE LENTZ ON RED CHINA 

The Student Union Major Speakers Series an- 
nounces the second Major Speaker of the academic 
year; it is Serge Lentz, editor of the Paris Match 
magazine and award winning foreign correspondent. 
Mr. Lentz will address the University Community on 
Monday, December 2nd at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Audi- 
torium. His address entitled "Impatient Giant: Red 
China" will concern itself with his recent trip into 
Red China when he spent three weeks traveling in 
and around the sprawling cities of Shanghai, Canton 
and Peking posing as a textile buyer and left the 
Peoples' Republic only after a frightening evening of 
interrogation by two Chinese Secret Service agents. 

Since returning from his saga, Lentz has been the 
object of relentless pursuit from national news media 
in this county. The interest in him is understand- 
able since he is one of a handful of Western journal- 
ists who have gotten into and out of Red China in 
the past decade. C.B.S. television, the Saturday Eve- 
ning Post, Newsweek Magazine and the German and 
European television networks have conducted or ar- 
ranged interviews or features on his unique journey. 

All Student Union Major Speakers addresses are 
open to the public without charge. Opportunities for 
individual questioning is afforded through the ques- 
tion and answer period following the address as well 
as the open informal reception in Flowers Lounge. 



PRE-ARTIST SERIES SEMINAR 
JOHN HANKS ON "TOSCA" 

On Tuesday, December 3rd the Student Union 
will hold an open seminar immediately prior to the 
Artist Series performance of "Tosca," at 7:00 p.m. 
in the Music Lounge of Flowers Building. Pro- 
fessor John Hanks of the Department of Music will 
discuss the art form involved as well as the specific 
opera. Those attending the seminars in the past have 
attested to their greater enjoyment of the concerts 
because of the information gained through their 
attendance. 



GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER 

The Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater will perform 
Puccini's "Tosca" on Tuesday, December 3rd at 8:15 
p.m. in Page Auditorium under the auspices of the 
Artists Series. 

With a company of fifty including orchestra and 
chorus, Boris Goldovsky presents "Tosca" in Eng- 
lish, fully staged with handsome sets and costumes. 
Puccini's compelling and vital drama, one of the most 
exciting of all Grand Operas, combines some of the 
composer's most memorable arias with a vivid and 
dramatic tale of love, murder, and tragedy. 

Tickets are priced at $2.50 and $2.00 and are avail- 
able in Room 202-A Flowers Building or call exten- 
sion 2911. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURE 

Dr. Ragnar Bring, Professor Emeritus of System- 
atic Theology of the University of Lund, Sweden, 
will present a lecture in York Chapel of the Divinity 
School on Wednesday, December 4th at 11 :00 a.m. 

Professor Bring is at present Visiting Professor at 
the University of Chicago Divinity School. He rep- 
resents the Lundensian School of Theology. His 
major contributions to theology are in the field of 
Theological Methodology and in Luther research. The 
topic for his lecture is "Conditions for Preaching in 
an Atheistic Age." The public is invited to attend. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY AND 

OCCUPATIONAL DEPARTMENTS 

OPEN HOUSE 

The Physical Therapy and Occupational Depart- 
ments cordially invites the members of the Duke Uni- 
versity Community to attend an Open House in its 
new quarters in Rooms 042-45 Medical Center, on 
Wednesday, December 4th, from 2:00-4:30 p.m. In 
addition to a tour of the department and demonstra- 
tions of physical therapy procedures, there will be an 
opportunity for those interested in a career in physical 
therapy to talk with faculty members about educa- 
tional requirements. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
December 4th at 4:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. John W. Duffield 
will speak on "Some Forest Problems and Practices 
in Yugoslavia." 

Dr. Duffield, Professor of Forestry at North Caro- 
lina State College, is a Cornell graduate with an 
M.F. from Harvard and a Ph.D. (genetics) from 
California. He has held positions with the U. S. 
Forest Service, the University of Washington, and 
the Industrial Forestry Association. His interests 
have been in tree improvement by applications of 



[3] 



genetics. His report on forestry in Yugoslavia results 
from his visit there last summer as an AID repre- 
sentative. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 



GOTHIC BOOKSHOP AUCTION 

The Fifteenth Book and Art Auction of the Gothic 
Bookshop will take place on Wednesday, December 
4th from 6:30 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. The articles to be auctioned will 
be on display from 9 :00 a.m. on the day of the sale. 
There will be a variety of scarce and interesting books, 
and decorative old maps, fine prints, and drawings for 
sale. 



JOSIAH C. TRENT 
MEDICAL HISTORY SOCIETY 

The Josiah C. Trent Medical History Society will 
have a meeting on Wednesday, December 4th at 8 :00 
p.m. in the Rare Book Room of the University Library. 
Professor Weston LaBarre will be the guest speaker. 
His subject will be "Homo Sapiens: Unique Animal." 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
STUDENT VOICE RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a voice 
recital by students of John Hanks on Friday, Decem- 
ber 6th, at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. Participating in the program will be Karen 
Lundry, soprano ; Sally Blackwell, mezzo-soprano ; 
Marjorie Randolph, soprano ; Yugo Suzuki, baritone 
and Ronald Steed, baritone. Mrs. Ruth Friedberg 
of the Department of Music will be at the piano. 
The University Community and the general public 
are cordially invited to attend. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE GRADUATE SEMINAR 

The Political Science Graduate Seminar will meet 
on Friday, December 6th, at 3 :00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. Dean Zelman Cowen of the Law 
School of the University of Melbourne will speak on 
"Treaty Making and Treaty Enforcement in the 
Federal States of the British Commonwealth." 



NEWCOMERS' CLUB CHRISTMAS PARTY 

The Newcomers' Club will hold a Christmas Party 
honoring its international members on Thursday, 
December 5th at 10:00 a.m. at the Y.W.C.A. 515 
West Chapel Hill Street. Four of the international 
wives will describe the Christmas or New Year's 
festivities in their native lands. The second part of 
the program will consist of a demonstration by the 
home economist from the Duke Power Company on the 
construction of Christmas decorations. 



ART DEPARTMENT LECTURE 

The Art Department announces a lecture spon- 
sored by The Mary Duke Biddle Foundation on 
Thursday, December 12th at 8 :15 p.m. in Room 204 
East Duke Building. Professor Robert Chester Smith, 
Professor of the History of Art, University of Penn- 
sylvania, will speak on "Portuguese Architecture, 
1500-1800." 

In addition, Professor Smith will give an informal 
talk dealing with his latest researches, "History of 
Portuguese Wood Sculpture" on Friday, December 
13th at 11:40 a.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. 
The public and all interested students and faculty are 
cordially invited to attend. 



INTERPLANETARY SPACECRAFT 
DESIGN LECTURE 

Mr. W. J. Schimandle, Section Chief of the Mariner 
Spacecraft Development program of the Jet Propul- 
sion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 
Pasadena, California, will present a special talk on 
Thursday, December 5th entitled "Progress and 
Problems in Interplanetary Spacecraft Design." The 
lecture will be given from 11 :30 a.m. to 12 :30 p.m. 
in the Lecture Room, Engineering Building. 

Mr. Schimandle is bringing models and samples 
of spacecraft materials and components with him and 
will illustrate his talk with numerous pictures. One 
of the most qualified individuals in the country in the 
design of spacecraft, Mr. Schimandle will describe the 
interesting and difficult problems of spacecraft mis- 
sions to Venus and Mars. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 



PHI BETA KAPPA FALL INITIATION 

Phi Beta Kappa will hold its annual fall initiation 
on Thursdav. December 5th at 8 :00 p.m. in the Union 
Ballroom, West Campus. All members are urged to 
be present and all initiates must be present. Those 
who have a part in the program must be present. 



CREATIVE ARTS COMMITTEE PRESENTS 

HUMPERDINCK'S 

HANSEL AND GRETEL 

On Friday, December 6th at 8 :15 p.m. and on 
Saturday, December 7th at 3 :00 p.m. the Creative 
Arts Committee will present an adaptation of 
Humperdinck's opera Hansel and Gretel. The 
student members of the University Symphony Orches- 
tra will play for this production. The cast includes 
Jean Mayo ('66), Frank Glass ('67), and Mike 
Schipke ('67) and will be performed in Page Audi- 
torium. 

Tickets will be on sale the week of the performance 
in the Main Quad of West Campus and at Page Box 
Office the two days of production. Seats are non- 
reserved at $1.00 for adults and $.50 for children, 12 
years and under. Pat Mauney ('65) may be con- 
tacted for further information. 



[4] 



ECONOMICS PUBLIC LECTURE 

Professor W. C. S. Leys, formerly Dean of the 
Facility of Commerce and now Senior Lecturer in 
charge of Commercial Law at the University of 
Auckland, New Zealand, will give a public lecture in 
the Court Room of the Law School at 3 :00 p.m. on 
Friday, December 6th. His topic will be "Scope 
and Effect of the Social Security System in New 
Zealand." 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 
Dr. Samuel P. Massie, President of North Carolina 
College, Durham, will speak at the Chemistry Staff 
Seminar on Friday, December 6th in Room 01 Chem- 
istry Building at 4 :00 p.m. The subject of Dr. 
Massie 's address will be "Will the Key Fit the Lock?" 
All interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
JUILLIARD STRING QUARTET 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the second 
concert of its season to be played by the Juilliard 
String Quartet on Saturday, December 7th at 8 :15 
p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. The 
concert is the fourth to be presented here by the 
Juilliard Quartet, the first being in March 1955. The 
musicians are Robert Mann and Isidore Cohen 
(Violins), Raphael Hillyer (Viola), and Claus Adam 
(Cello). The program follows : 

Beethoven Quartet in C-sharp minor, Opus 131 

Irving Fine Quartet No. 1 

Mozart Quartet in B-flat major, K. 589 

Other Chamber Music Concerts scheduled this 
season include: 

January 11 (Saturday) Hungarian Quartet 

February 8 (Saturday) Quartetto Italiano 

March 21 (Saturday) Fine Arts Quartet 

April 11 (Saturday) New York String Sextet 

Admission : 

All membership cards for the current season are 
subscribed. A guest card for a single admission to any 
one concert costs $2.50. About 60 guest cards are 
available for each concert. They may be obtained at 
the Music Room door from 7 :30 to 8 :00 p.m. on con- 
cert evenings. Inquiries may be addressed to Chamber 
Arts Society, c/o Ernest W. Nelson, Box 6065, College 
Station. 



ROBERT M. BRODERSON ART EXHIBITION 

The Student Union and the Department of Art are 
sponsoring jointly an exhibition of recent works by 
Robert M. Broderson. The exhibition which will run 
through Sunday, December 15th is in two sections: 
paintings will be displayed in the Gallery of the 
Woman's College Library, East Campus, and draw- 
ings and lithographs will fill the Alumni Lounge 
Gallery of the Union Building of West Campus. 

Mr. Broderson is a well known figure on campus, 
being an Associate Professor in the Art Department 
and Director of its studio program. His career as a 



professional artist began even before he received his 
Bachelor of Arts from Duke in 1950. Over the last 
15 years, his works have been shown and have received 
awards in innumerable regional and national exhibi- 
tions including frequent one man shows in New York 
and elsewhere. His work, reproductions of which have 
appeared in leading art periodicals, have entered 
many private collections and such public collections as 
the Whitney Museum in New York, the Wadsworth 
Apheneum in Hartford, and the University Museum at 
Princeton. The Duke University Press will publish 
in the Spring of 1964 a volume devoted to his 
drawings. 



FRENCH AND SPANISH EXAMINATIONS 
FOR GRADUATE DEGREES 

The French and Spanish examination for candi- 
dates for graduate degrees will be given on Friday, 
January 10th at 4 :00 p.m. in Rooms 113 and 114 
Physics Building. Candidates should register for 
this examination no later than Friday, December 20th 
in the Graduate School Office 



CHRISTMAS PROGRAMS 

George Frederick Handel's The Messiah will be 
performed on Sunday, December 8th at 4 :00 p.m. and 
on the following Tuesday, December 10th at 8 :00 
p.m. in the University Chapel. 

This marks the thirty-first annual presentation of 
Handel's celebrated oratorio by the Choir of the Duke 
Chapel. The Acting Director, James Young, will 
direct the Choir, and Mildred L. Hendrix, University 
Organist, will serve as organist for these presentations. 
Soloists for the first performance will include : Byung 
K. Kwon, bass-baritone ; John Hanks, tenor ; Tina 
Pfohl, contralto ; and Mrs. J. Herbert Waldrop, Jr., 
soprano. Soloists for the second performance will 
include : Waller Vassar, bass-baritone ; John Hanks, 
tenor ; Tina Pfohl, contralto ; and Mrs. J. Herbert 
Waldrop, Jr., soprano. 



CHRISTMAS IN WORD AND MUSIC 
Christmas in Word and Music will again be pre- 
sented in the University Chapel on Sunday, December 
15th at 8 :00 p.m. Composed and presented for the 
first time three years ago, it has been repeated each 
year since by popular request. 



CHRISTMAS DISPLAYS 

An invitation is extended to members of the Uni- 
versity Community to participate in an open exhibi- 
tion of plastic, graphic and photographic art to be 
displayed in the foyer of Page Auditorium on Friday 
and Saturday, December 6th and 7th. The displays 
must embody the spirit of Christmas or the winter 
season, and will be shown in conjunction with the 
student-produced Hansel and Gretel opera. Those 
interested will please contact Betsy Ghodes in South- 
gate or Jerry Sawers, G-202, or write Box 4934, Duke 
Station. 



[5] 



FALL 1963-1964 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 

OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

ANY STUDENT HAVING A SCHEDULE OF THREE 
EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS OR 
TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME MUST 
REPORT TO THE DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER THAN 
January,^; 1964 TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN SCHEDULE. 



Saturday ' 
January 11 


2:00- 3:00 p.m. 


Physical Education 


Monday 
January 13: 


: Reading Period 


No examination scheduled 


Tuesday 
January 14 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 

7:00-10:00 p.m. 


MWF4 

All Language 1 
Engineering 1.5-1.8 
Philosophy 48 


Wednesday 
January 15 


9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7: 00-10 :00 p.m. 


MWF1 
MWF7 
Political Science 11, 61 


Thursday 
January 16 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 


Botany 1 
TTS3 
Physics 1, 41 


Friday 
January 17 


9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 

7: 00-10 :00 p.m. 


Chemistry 1, IX 
TT6 

Engineering 1.1-1.4 
Economics 57 



Saturday 
January 18 



9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 



English 1 
MWF3 



Monday 
January 20 



9 = 00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 



MWF2 
History 1, IX 
Economics 51 



Tuesday 
January 21 



9:00-12:00 noon 

2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7: 00-10 :00 p.m. 



TTS5 

TT7 

TTS4 

Math 11,21,41 



Wednesday 
January 22 



9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7 = 00-10:00 p.m. 



MWF6 

French, Spanish 63 

TT8 



Thursday 
January 23 



9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 



TTS1 

Religion 1, IX 
TTS2 



Friday 
January 24 



9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 



MWF5 
Naval Science 



ENGINEERING COURSES, OTHER THAN ENGINEER- 
ING 1, WILL MEET FOR EXAMINATION AT THE 
REGULAR CLASS PERIODS. 

Chemistry (except Chemistry 1) and Zoology classes meet 
for examination at the time scheduled for their general lecture 
period. ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE 
FOREGOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE 
PERIOD BEGINNING January 14, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
January 24, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE 
GIVEN BEFORE 9:00 a.m., January 14, WITH THE EX- 
CEPTION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS 
TO BE MADE IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION 
WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 
University Schedule Committee 



WEEK OF 



Dec. 8-14, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Dec. 8-14, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, December 8 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Eecital. John 6. Simpson, 

Student Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Elfan Rees, World Council of Churches, 
Geneva. Sermon: "Bread for My Brother." 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 

3:30 p.m. Carillon and Brass Quintet Christmas 
Music. University Chapel. 

4:00 p.m. Chapel Choir presents "The Messiah." 
University Chapel. 

5:00 p.m. Christmas Supper. YWCA. 515 West 
Chapel Hill Street. 

8:00 p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Philosophy Colloquium. 
Speaker: Professor John A. Bretlinger. 213 
Caldwell Hall. 



Monday, December 9 



Con- 



4:00 p.m. Engineering Faculty Council. 

ference Room Engineering Building. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Department Seminar. Speaker: 

Dr. John L. Roberts. Auditorium of Biological 

Sciences Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 



7:30 p.m. Student Union Films on Skiing. Page 

Auditorium. (No charge.) 
7:30 p.m. Duke Sailing Club Lecture. Speaker: 

Dean J. L. Meriam. Engineering Auditorium. 



Tuesday, December 10 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Robert Osborn. 

12:15 p.m. Biophysics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Wil- 
liam D. Odell. Room 023 Biological Sciences 
Building. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 
Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

2:00-9:00 p.m. Registration of delegates of colleges 
and universities, and representatives of learned 
societies and professional organizations attend- 
ing the Inaugural Convocation. Lounge, 
Flowers Building. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
Joseph Battle. Room 114 Physics Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

5:00 p.m. Gerontology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
David Bruce Dill. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:20 p.m. Carillon and Brass Quintet Christmas 
Music. University Chapel. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 pjn., Wednesday, Extension 2911, 



7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 
Card Gymnasium. 

7:30 p.m. German Film Presentation. Page Audi- 
torium. 

8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir presents "The Messiah." 
University Chapel. 



Wednesday, December 11 

a.m. PLEASE NOTE: All classes dismissed 
the first through the fifth periods. 

■9:45 a.m. Registration of delegates, Inaugural 
Convocation. Lounge, Flowers Building. 
a.m. Formation of the Academic Procession, 
Inaugural Convocation. Card Gymnasium. 

•10:30 a.m. Carillon Kecital, Mr. Anton Brees, 
Lake Wales, Florida. 

a.m. Inaugural Convocation. Indoor Stadium. 
p.m. Medical Seminar. Hospital Amphi- 
theatre. 

p.m. Botany Seminar. Speaker : Dr. William 
J. Stambaugh. Auditorium of Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 

-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

and 9:05 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Audi- 
torium. "Sundays and Cybele" with Hardy 
Kruger, Nicole Courcel and introducing 
Patricia Gozzi. Academy Award Winner. 
"Best Foreign Picture of the Year!" 
10:00 p.m. S. IT. Bridge Club. Green Boom, 
East Duke Building. 

p.m. Christmas Choral Communion. Hospital 
Amphitheater. 

p.m. Duke Players Performance : ' ' The Glass 
Menagerie." Branson Hall, 
p.m. Modern Dance Lecture Demonstration. 
Ark, East Campus. 

Thursday, December 12 

10:10 a.m. Divinitv School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. William P. Randolph. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Physiology Seminar. 
Speaker : Dr. Bruce Dill. Room M-204 Medical 
Center. 

4:00 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council. Room 
208 Flowers Building. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
facrdty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance "The Glass 
Menagerie." Branson Hall. 



8:10 

8:00. 

9:45 

10:00 

10:30 
4:00 

4:15 

5:00. 
7:00 



7:00 
8:00 
8:15 
8:15 



Friday, December 13 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Choir Christmas Program. 
Director : Professor John Hanks. York Chapel. 

3:15 p.m. Final Examination of Mr. George E. 
McCelvey for the Ph.D. degree in English. 
Room 312 Allen Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:00 p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Philosophy Colloquium. 
Speaker: Professor James L. Celarier. 213 
Caldwell Hall. 

8:00-10:00 p.m. Women's Recreation Association 
Open House. Woman's College Gymnasium. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance "The Glass 
Menagerie." Branson Hall. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Concert Band Christmas Perform- 
ance. Conductor: Paul Bryan. Page Audi- 
torium. 

Saturday, December 14 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union All-Campus Bridge 
Tournament. The Ark, East Campus. 

6:15 p.m. Freshmen Basketball: Duke versus 
Charlotte College. Indoor Stadium. 

7:00 and 9:05 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Sundays and Cybele" with 
Hardy Kruger, Nicole Coucel and introducing 
Patricia Gozzi. Academy Award Winner. 
"Best Foreign Picture of the Year!" 

8:15 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke versus Clem- 
son. Indoor Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance "The Glass 
Menagerie." Branson Hall. 
Please Notice: DUKE STRING QUARTET 
CONCERT POSTPONED. The performance 
of the Duke String Quartet originally scheduled 
for Saturday, December 14th at 8 :15 p.m. in 
the Music Room of East Duke Building has 
been postponed until further notice. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Elfan Rees, Refugee Advisor, 
World Council of Churches, Geneva, will deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship at 11 :00 
a.m. on Sunday, December 8th in the University 
Chapel. His subject will be "Bread for My Brother." 
The order of worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, 

Dean of the Chapel 
Lector: The Reverend John J. Carey, Chaplain to United 

Church of Christ Students 
Opening Organ Voluntary — In Dulci Jubilo Bach 

Two Settings 
Noel D 'aquin 

Choral Call to Worship — "The Lord Is in His Holy Temple" 

Calvin W. Laufer 
Hymn of Adoration— " Holy, Holy, Holy! " John B. DyJces 
Prayers of Confession and For Pardon 



[2] 



Words of Assurance 

The Lord 's Prayer 

Anthem — ' ' And the Glory of the Lord ' ' from The Messiah 

George F. Eandel 
Scripture Lesson — Matthew 14: 3-21 
Hymn — ' ' Heaven Is Here, Where Hymns of Gladness ' ' 

Francis J. Haydn 
Call to Prayer 
Prayer of Thanksgiving 
Prayers of Intercession and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem—' ' For Unto Us a Child Is Born ' ' 

from The Messiah George F. Handel 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — "Bread for My Brother" 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Sevenfold Amen" John Stainer 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Fugue on "Vom Himmel Hoch" 

Pachelbel 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
Christmas sermon at the University Service of 
Worship next Sunday, December 15th, is the Reverend 
Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel and James 
B. Duke Professor of Preaching, in the Divinity 
School. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Sunday, 1:45 P.M., 
Rides leave East and West circles for the Murdoch 
School at Butner. This will be the final session be- 
fore Christmas; all interested persons are urged to 
attend. Friday, 6:15 P.M., Center, Supper and 
Worship, followed by a Christmas Party including 
decorating a Christmas tree and listening to Christmas 
readings. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Sunday, 
6:00 P.M., East Duke Building Green Room, Dr. 
W. D. White will speak on, ' ' The Relation between 
Religion and Education." 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9:00 A.M., Center, 
Freshman Forum, Discussion of Arthur Miller's 
Death Of A Salesman; 6:30 P.M., Center, Holy Com- 
munion; The liturgy of the Lutheran Church in 
America will be celebrated by Pastor Clayton Sugg 
of Christ Lutheran Church and Dr. Egil Grislis of 
the Divinity School. Dr. Grislis will lead a discussion 
of the meaning of the Lutheran service afterwards. 
Tuesday, 5 :00 P.M., East Campus Union, Social Ac- 
tion Commission meeting; 7:00 P.M., Center, Semi- 
nar: "The Meaning of Freedom." Thursday, 9:00 
P.M., Men's Graduate Center, Seminar: "Contem- 
porary Criticisms of Christianity." 

Wesley Players will present Rosmersholm, by 
Henrik Ibsen, at 8 :00 P.M., on December 16, 17 and 
18 at the Methodist Center. Admission is $1.00. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: 
Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., home of Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. 
Jackson; a joint meeting with the UCCF of North 
Carolina College is planned. Discussion will be on 
Chapter 3 of Bishop Robinson's book, Honest to God. 
Transportation will leave the Chapel steps, the East 



Campus circle and Hanes House at 5:15 P.M. Thurs- 
day, 12 :40 P.M., Luncheon at Gilbert- Addoms Dining 
Hall on East Campus. 

WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, 4:45 
P.M., Meet at Presbyterian Student Center for rides 
to Chapel Hill. We will be guests of the UNC West- 
minster Fellowship for supper. 



MEDICAL SEMINAR 

Interested persons in the University Community 
are invited to attend a seminar on "The Care of the 
Patient" sponsored by the Duke Chapter of the Stu- 
dent American Medical Association and the Cabot So- 
ciety of Duke Medical Center. Participants include : 
Dr. E. A. Stead, Jr., chairman, Department of Medi- 
cine ; The Reverend Professor James T. Clelend, Dean 
of the Chapel; Dr. W. P. J. Peete, Department of 
Surgery; and Miss Virginia Gover, Faculty of Nurs- 
ing. This seminar will be held on Wednesday, De- 
cember 11th at 4:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphi- 
theatre. 



CARILLON AND BRASS QUINTET 
CHRISTMAS MUSIC 

On Sunday, December 8th at 3 :30 p.m. and on 
Tuesday, December 10th at 7 :20 p.m., immediately 
preceding the performance of "The Messiah" in the 
University Chapel, there will be a recital of music for 
Brass Quintet and Carillon from the Chapel Tower. 
John G. Simpson, Student Carillonneur, will be ac- 
companied by the Brass Quintet directed by R. R. 
Trevarthen of the Department of Music. Members of 
the quintet are, undergraduates: Edward Keller, 
trumpet ; Ron Vaughn, trumpet ; Ben Peck, trom- 
bone ; Tom Anderson, baritone ; and Jim Rivera, tuba. 
The program follows : 

Carol of the Bells 

Carillon 
Motet and Boyal Fanfare 

Brass Quintet 
Alleluia 

Brass Quintet and Carillon 
Fantasy of Christmas Carols Arr. R. R. Trevarthen 

Brass Quintet and Carillon 



Leontovich 

Arr. Barnes 

Josquin des Prez 

J. S. Bach 



CHRISTMAS PROGRAMS 

George Frederick Handel's The Messiah will be 
performed on Sunday, December 8th at 4 :00 p.m. and 
on the following Tuesday, December 10th at 8 :00 
p.m. in the University Chapel. 

This marks the thirty-first annual presentation of 
Handel's celebrated oratorio by the Choir of the Duke 
Chapel. The Acting Director, James Young, will 
direct the Choir, and Mildred L. Hendrix, University 
Organist, will serve as organist for these presentations. 
Soloists for the first performance will include : Byung 
K. Kwon, bass-baritone ; John Hanks, tenor ; Tina 
Pfohl, contralto; and Mrs. J. Herbert Waldrop, Jr., 
soprano. Soloists for the second performance will 
include : Waller Vassar, bass-baritone ; John Hanks, 
tenor; Tina Pfohl, contralto; and Mrs. J. Herbert 
Waldrop, Jr., soprano. 



[3] 



CHRISTMAS SUPPER 

The Durham YWCA, 515 West Chapel Hill Street, 
invites international students to join others in the 
community in a family Christmas supper on Sunday, 
December 8th at 5 :00 p.m. in the Hill Room. Inter- 
ested students can telephone the YWCA, 681-2041, 
for further information. Transportation can be pro- 
vided if needed. Families are invited to bring a favor- 
ite food for this covered dish supper. Students in 
dormitories are invited as guests. 



JOINT DUKE-UNC PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIA 

On Sunday, December 8th at 8:00 p.m. in 213 
Caldwell Hall, Professor John A. Bretlinger of the 
University of Massachusetts will speak on "Dialectic 
in Plato's Symposium." The next meeting will be 
held on Friday, December 13th at 8:00 p.m. in 213 
Caldwell Hall. Professor James L. Celarier of the 
University of Maryland will speak on "Gorgias on 
Talking About Nothing." 



ENGINEERING FACULTY COUNCIL 

The Engineering Faculty Council will meet on 
Monday, December 9th at 4 :00 p.m. in the Conference 
Room of the Engineering Building. 



ZOOLOGY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, December 9th, in the Auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building at 4 :15 p.m. Dr. 
John L. Roberts, Department of Zoology, University 
of Massachusetts, will speak on "Metabolic Influences 
of Photoperiod and Season on Sunfish. " Coffee and 
tea will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



SPECIAL ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 
PRESENTS SKIING FILMS 
The Special Activities Committee of the Student 
Union will present two skiing films: "Ernie McCul- 
loch Teaches Skiing" and the American Broadcasting 
Company's "World Ski Champions in 1962 at Cha- 
monix. " These films, both in color, will be presented 
on Monday, December 9th at 7 :30 p.m. in Page Audi- 
torium. The University Community is cordially in- 
vited to attend and there will be no admission charge. 



DUKE SAILING CLUB LECTURE 

There will be a Duke Sailing Club Lecture entitled 
' ' One Thousand Leagues Over the Sea ' ' on Monday, 
December 9th at 7 :30 p.m. in the Engineering Audi- 
torium. The speaker will be Dean J. L. Meriam of 
the Engineering School who will describe his voyage 
from San Francisco to Hawaii in a 25 foot sailing 
boat. 



BIOPHYSICS SEMINAR 

The Committee on Biophysics will hold a seminar 
on Tuesday, December 10th, at 12:15 p.m. in Room 
023 Biological Sciences Building. Dr. William D. 



Odell, Endocrinology Branch, National Cancer Insti- 
tute, Bethesda, Maryland, will speak on "Radiation 
inactivation Studies on Human Gonadotropins." 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 

There will be a Mathematics Seminar on Tuesday. 
December 10th at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 114 Physics 
Building. Dr. Joseph Battle, North Carolina College, 
will speak on "Some Current Problems in Topological 
Graph Theory." Coffee will be served in Room 120 
Physics Building at 3 :30 p.m. 



GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Council on Gerontology will present in an 
open seminar Dr. David Bruce Dill, Research Scholar, 
Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Indiana 
University, who will speak on "Fitness of Twenty 
Harvard Men : 1940 and 1962." This meeting will be 
held on Tuesday, December 10th at 5 :00 p.m. in Room 
208 Flowers Building. All interested persons are in- 
vited to attend. 



GERMAN FILM PRESENTATION 

Delta Phi Alpha, German honorary society, will 
present a German film, "Dreaming Lips" with Maria 
Schell on Tuesday, December 10th at 7 :30 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. General admission tickets priced 
at $.50 a person will be available at the Page Box 
Office at 7 :00 p.m. This film will have English sub- 
titles. 



SUSPENSION OF CLASSES 

Classes will be dismissed the first through the fifth 
periods on Wednesday, December 11th, to allow par- 
ticipation by the academic members of the University 
Community in the inauguration of President Douglas 
M. Knight. 



THE INAUGURATION OF 
PRESIDENT DOUGLAS M. KNIGHT 

On Founders' Day, Wednesday, December 11th, 
Duke University's fifth and youngest president will 
be installed at an inaugural convocation to be held in 
the Indoor Stadium beginning at 10 :30 a.m. The en- 
tire University Community as well as the general pub- 
lic are invited to the ceremony. 

Prior to assuming his duties at Duke University 
on September 1st, 1963, Dr. Knight was for nine years 
president of Lawrence College, Appleton, Wisconsin ; 
before this assignment he taught at Yale University 
from which he had received the A.B., M.A., and Ph.D. 
in English. 

Dr. Knight's predecessors include Dr. William 
Preston Few (last president of Trinity College and 
first president of Duke University — 1910-1940) ; Dr. 
Robert Lee Flowers (1940-1948) ; Dr. A. Hollis Edens 
(1948-1960) ; and Dr. Deryl Hart (1960-1963). 

The program for the inaugural convocation for the 



[4] 



installation of Douglas Maitland Knight as president 
of Duke University is as follows : 

Musical Prelude: 

Toccata and Fugue in C Major Bach-Weiner 

Duke University Symphony Orchestra 
Professor Allan H. Bone, Conductor 
Processional 
The National Anthem 

Invocation: Chaplain Howard C. Wilkinson 
Welcoming Remarks : Provost R. Taylor Cole 
From the students, Mr. Kip McKinney Espy 
From the faculty, Professor William B. Hamilton 
From the alumni, Mr. Leon S. Ivey 
Music by the Duke University Symphony Orchestra 
Symphony No. 5 in D Major, Opus 107 

("Reformation") Mendelssohn 

4th Movement, Andante eon moto (Chorale: 
"Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott") 
Allegro maestoso 
Prayer of Installation: The Reverend Professor James T. 

Cleland, Dean of the Chapel 
Installation of the President: Mr. Bunyan Snipes Womble, 

Chairman, Board of Trustees 
The Inaugural Address : President Douglas M. Knight 
The Alma Mater 
The Benediction : Dr. Cleland 
The Procession from the Hall 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
December 11th, at 4 :15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. William J. Stam- 
baugh will speak on "Insects and Tree Diseases." 

Dr. Stambaugh, received his advanced training at 
Penn State and Yale Universities, specializing in 
Forest Pathology. Prior to joining the staff of the 
Duke School of Forestry, he served as forest pathol- 
ogist in the School of Forestry at Pennsylvania State 
University. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4 -.00 
p.m. 



CHRISTMAS CHORAL COMMUNION 

The annual Christmas Choral Communion, a serv- 
ice for patients at Duke Hospital, will be presented 
by the Religious Activities Committee of the School 
of Nursing on Wednesday, December 11th, at 8 :00 
p.m., in the Hospital Amphitheater. Students and 
faculty are welcome. 



MODERN DANCE LECTURE-DEMONSTRATION 

Terpsichorean, the modern dance club, will pre- 
sent "Elements of Composition," the second in a 
series of lecture-demonstrations entitled Three Con- 
certs in Modern Dance, on Wednesday, December 
11th at 8 :15 p.m. in The Ark on East Campus. A 
cordial invitation is extended to members of the Uni- 
versity Community to attend these functions without 
charge. These programs are designed to more 
thoroughly acquaint the University Community with 
the essentials, the famous figures, and the thoughts 
and ideals behind modern dance. 



On Wednesday, December 18th at 8 :15 p.m. in 
The Ark, the last program in the series, "Group Re- 
lationships and Labanotation," will be presented. 



DUKE PLAYERS PRESENT 
THE GLASS MENAGERIE 

Duke Players will present The Glass Menagerie by 
Tennessee Williams, directed by Victor Michalak, on 
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Decem- 
ber 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th at 8:15 p.m. in the 
Arena in Branson Hall, East Campus. Tickets priced 
at $1.25 can be reserved by calling the box office in 
Branson, Extension 3181, Monday and Tuesday be- 
tween 2 :00 and 5 :00 p.m. In addition, the box office 
will be open from 2 :00 until performance time 
Wednesday through Saturday. 

Mr. Williams called this a "memory play." It is 
Williams at his gentlest, with the themes which char- 
acterize his work as a whole, but without the violence 
of character and action which are more typical of 
later plays. It tells the story of Tom Wingfield, his 
crippled sister, Laura, their ambitious but bumbling 
mother, Amanda, and the Gentleman Caller — the 
emissary from the world outside the fragile confines 
of Laura's glass menagerie. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology Seminar will meet 
on Thursday, December 12th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
M-204 Medical Center. Dr. Bruce Dill, Department 
of Anatomy and Physiology, Indiana University, will 
speak on "High Altitudes Revisited." 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 

The Undergraduate Faculty Council will meet at 
4:00 p.m. on Thursday, December 12th in Room 208 
Flowers Building. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. George E. McCelvey 
for the Ph.D. degree in English will be held on Fri- 
day, December 13th, at 3 :15 p.m. in Room 312 Allen 
Building. The subject of Mr. McCelvey 's disserta- 
tion is "William Godwin's Novels: Theme and 
Craft." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Lionel Stevenson, Charles E. 
Ward, C. Richard Sanders, Merle M. Bevington, and 
Paul Welsh. Professor Stevenson will preside. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL CHOIR 

A special Christmas program by the Divinity 
School Choir, under the direction of Professor John 
Hanks and with Miss Helen Kendall as organist, will 
be given at York Chapel on Friday, December 13th 
at 10 :10 a.m. The program will include well known 
Christmas anthems, chorals, and hymns. The public 
is cordially invited. 



[5] 



DUKE CONCERT BAND 
CHRISTMAS PERFORMANCE 

The Department of Music will present the Duke 
University Concert Band, Paul Bryan, Conductor, on 
Friday, December 13th at 8 :15 p.m in Page Audi- 
torium. Featured on the program will be the pre- 
miere performance of Overture 1912 by Iain Hamil- 
ton, Mary Duke Biddle Professor of Music. Another 
special feature will be Hector Berlioz' Funeral and 
Triumphal Symphony, with the Durham High School 
Wind Ensemble and Concert Choir and the Durham 
Civic Choral Society. The Enigma Variations, Opus 
36, by Edward Elgar, arranged by Professor Earl 
Slocum of the Department of Music, University of 
North Carolina will be performed with Mr. Slocum 
as guest conductor. There will be no admission 
charge and the University Community and general 
public are cordially invited to attend. The program 
is as follows: 

PROGRAM 

"The Earle of Oxford's Marche" from the 

William Byrd Suite Gordon Jacob 

"1912," A Light Overture (1958) Iain Hamilton 

Enigma Variations, Opus 36 Edward Elgar, arr. 

by Earl Slocum 

Theme — Enigma 

Variation I (C.A.E.) 

Variation II (W.M.B.) 

Variation III (R.P.A.) 

Variation IV (G.R.S.) 

Variation V (Nimrod) 

Variation VI Finale (E.D.TJ.) 

Conducted by Earl Slocum 

INTERMISSION 
Symphonie Funebre et Triomphale, Opus 15 
Marche Funebre — Moderato un poco lento 
Oraison Funebre — Adagio non tanto; Andantino; 
Andantino poco lento e sostenuto 

Benjamin Peck, Trombone Solo 

Apothlose — Allegro non troppo e pomposo 

Duke University Concert Band 

Durham High School Wind Ensemble 

Durham High School Concert Choir 

Durham Civic Choral Society 



Hector Berlioz 



STUDENT UNION ALL-CAMPUS 
DUPLICATE BRIDGE TOURNAMENT 

The Student Union All-Campus Duplicate Bridge 
Tournament will be held on Saturday, December 14th 
from 2 :00 to 5 :00 p.m. in The Ark on East Campus. 
This event is open to all members of the University 
Community. The tournament has been sanctioned by 
the American Contract Bridge League and master 
points will be awarded. The entrance fee is $.50 and 
prizes will be given. 



ROBERT M. BRODERSON ART EXHIBITION 

The Student Union and the Department of Art are 
sponsoring jointly an exhibition of recent works by 
Robert M. Broderson. The exhibition which will run 
through Sunday, December 15th is in two sections: 
paintings will be displayed in the Gallery of the 
"Woman's College Library, East Campus, and draw- 



ings and lithographs will fill the Alumni Lounge 
Gallery of the Union Building of West Campus. 

Mr. Broderson is a well known figure on campus, 
being an Associate Professor in the Art Department 
and Director of its studio program. His career as a 
professional artist began even before he received his 
Bachelor of Arts from Duke in 1950. Over the last 
15 years, his works have been shown and have received 
awards in innumerable regional and national exhibi- 
tions including frequent one man shows in New York 
and elsewhere. His work, reproductions of which have 
appeared in leading art periodicals, have entered 
many private collections and such public collections as 
the Whitney Museum in New York, the Wadsworth 
Apheneum in Hartford, and the University Museum at 
Princeton. The Duke University Press will publish 
in the Spring of 1964 a volume devoted to his 
drawings. 



FRENCH AND SPANISH EXAMINATIONS 
FOR GRADUATE DEGREES 

The French and Spanish examination for candi- 
dates for graduate degrees will be given on Friday, 
January 10th at 4:00 p.m. in Rooms 113 and 114 
Physics Building. Candidates should register for 
this examination no later than Friday, December 20th 
in the Graduate School Office 



DINING HALL ANNOUNCEMENT 
Due to the Inauguration Dinner for President 
Knight on Tuesday, December 10th, the Blue and 
White Room will be closed for the evening meal. The 
Gothic Hall, The University Room and the Oak Room 
will be open from 4 :30 to 7 :00 p.m. Arrangements 
have been made for Duke men to dine on East Campus 
at Gilbert- Addoms and the Women's Union. 



SCHEDULE FOR 
UNIVERSITY WEEKLY CALENDAR 

There will be one more edition of the University 
Weekly Calendar for December 12-21 before the 
Christmas recess. 

Deadline for notices to appear in the first edi- 
tion of the new year, the week of January 3-11, is 
Thursday, January 2, 1964. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John D. Woods for 
the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry- was held on Wednes- 
day, December 4th, at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 303 Chemis- 
try Building. The subject of Mr. Wood's dissertation 
was "The Crystal Structure of N.N-Diphenylaceta- 
mide. " The committee that conducted the examina- 
tion consisted of Professors William R. Krigbaum, 
Peter Smith, John H. Saylor, Jacques C. Poirier, and 
N. R. Roberson. Professor Krigbaum presided. 



[6] 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
CHRISTMAS IN WORD AND MUSIC 

"Christmas in Word and Music" will again be 
presented in the University Chapel next Sunday eve- 
ning, December 15th, beginning at 8:00 p.m. Com- 
posed and presented for the first time three years ago, 
it has been repeated each year since, by popular re- 
quest. Consisting of selections from the finest Christ- 
mas music, the most representative Scriptural recitals 
of Christmas, and beloved carols, the service of wor- 
ship gives the prophecy of the coming of Jesus Christ, 
and the fulfillment of that prophecy. Choral music 
will be presented by the Men's Chorus and the Wom- 
en's Chorus. A variety of instrumental music will be 
included. The Presiding Minister will be the Rever- 
end Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel and 
James B. Duke Professor of Preaching. The reader 
will be the Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 
Chaplain to the University. Musical and choral por- 
tions of the service will be under the supervision of 
Mrs. Mildred Hendrix, University Organist, and Mr. 
George Troutwein, Director of the Men's and Wom- 
en's Choruses. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
LECTURE SERIES ON 
CURRENT ECONOMIC PROBLEMS 
James B. Duke Professor of Economics, Dr. Calvin 
B. Hoover, will speak in the Lecture Room Building 
9 on Monday, December 16th at 8 :00 p.m. His topic 
will be "Slowdown in Soviet Economic Growth? A 
Comparison of Recent Trends in the U.S. and 
U.S.S.R. " This lecture, sponsored by the Department 
of Economics and Business Administration, is the first 
in a series of current economic problems. Succeeding 
topics and speakers include: "The Tax Cut" — Pro- 
fessor William P. Yohe in February, 1964; "Popula- 
tion Problems" — James B. Duke Professor Joseph J. 
Spengler in March, 1964; and " Automation "—Pro- 
fessor Juanita Kreps in April, 1964. The public is 
cordially invited. 



FALL 1963-1964 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 

OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

ANY STUDENT HAVING A SCHEDULE OP THREE 
EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS OR 
TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME MUST 
REPORT TO THE DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER THAN 
January 6, 1964 TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN SCHEDULE. 



Friday 
January 10 


6:00- 7:00 p.m. 


Physical Education 


Monday 
January 13 


Reading Period 


No examination scheduled 


Tuesday 
January 14 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 

7:00-10:00 p.m. 


MWF4 
All Language 1 
Engineering 1.5-1.8 
Philosophy 48 


Wednesday 
January 15 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 


MWF1 
MWF7 
Political Science 11, 61 



Thursday 
January 16 



9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7: 00-10 :00 p.m. 



Botany 1 
TTS3 
Physics 1, 41 



Friday 
January 17 



9:00-12: 
2:00- 5 



00 noon 
00 p.m. 



7:00-10:00 p.m. 



Chemistry 1, IX 
TT6 

Engineering 1.1-1.4 
Economics 57 



Saturday 
January 18 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 


English 1 
MWF3 


Monday 
January 20 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10 :00 p.m. 


MWF2 
History 1, IX 
Economics 51 


Tuesday 
January 21 


9:00-12:00 noon 

2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7 -.00-10 :00 p.m. 


TTS5 

TT7 

TTS4 

Math 11, 21, 41 


Wednesday 
January 22 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 


MWF6 

French, Spanish 63 

TT8 


Thursday 
January 23 


9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7 -.00-10 :00 p.m. 


TTS1 

Religion 1, IX 
TTS2 


Friday 
January 24 


9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 


MWF5 
Naval Science 



ENGINEERING COURSES, OTHER THAN ENGINEER- 
ING 1, WILL MEET FOR EXAMINATION AT THE 
REGULAR CLASS PERIODS. 

Chemistry (except Chemistry 1) and Zoology classes meet 
for examination at the time scheduled for their general lecture 
period. ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE 
FOREGOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE 
PERIOD BEGINNING January 14, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
January 24, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE 
GIVEN BEFORE 9:00 a.m., January 14, WITH THE EX- 
CEPTION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS 
TO BE MADE IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION 
WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 
University Schedule Committee 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
CHRISTMAS VESPERS 

As announced in the University Fall Calendar, the 
annual Christmas Vespers will be observed in the 
Duke Chapel on Tuesday evening, December 17th, 
from 7 :00-8 :00 p.m. Participating in the service will 
be Dr. Waldo Beach of the Divinity School, Reader; 
the Duke Madrigal Singers, directed by Eugenia 
Saville of the Music Department ; the Duke Recorders 
Group ; and the University Carilloneur. Preceded by 
Carillon music from the Chapel Tower, the service of 
poetry and choral music appropriate to the season 
will be observed in candlelight. Members of the Uni- 
versity Community and friends are invited to join us 
in this service. 



UNIVERSITY SPRING ACTIVITIES 
CALENDAR NOTICE 

Announcements for the printed UNIVERSITY 
SPRING ACTIVITIES CALENDAR, compiled, 
published, and distributed by the Student Union's 
Special Service Committee at the beginning of each 
semester, must be in Room 202-A Flowers Building 
by Wednesday, December 18th, in order to be in 
the printer's hands for a February first release. 
Faculty and staff members scheduling events for 
the Spring Semester are urged to get their an- 
nouncements in at once. 



[7] 



WEEK OF 

Dec. 15-21, 1963 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Dec. 15-21, 1963 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, December 15 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon with Brass Quintet. John 
G-. Simpson, Student Carillonneur. Mr. R. R. 
Trevarthen, Director of Quintet. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Pro- 
fessor James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. 
Sermon: "Bethlehem and Bedlam." Broad- 
east over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC- 
FM. 



8:00 p.m. Christmas in Word and Music, 
sity Chapel. 



Univer- 



Monday, December 16 



4:15 



p.m. Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Bruce 

L. Welch. Auditorium of Biological Sciences 

Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 

faculty, staff members, and students. 

p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 

Page Auditorium. 
8:00 p.m. Lecture Series on Current Economic 

Problems. Speaker: Dr. Calvin B. Hoover. 

Lecture Room Building 9. 

8:00 p.m. Wesley Players Present "Rosmersholm." 
Methodist Center, Oregon Street. 



5:30 



Tuesday, December 17 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dean Robert E. Cushman. 
12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

William R. Hare. Room 114 Physics Building. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:30 p.m. East Campus Christmas Dinners. East 

Union and Gilbert-Addoms Dormitories. 
7:00-8:00 p.m. Christmas Vespers. University 

Chapel. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 

Card Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish Honorary) 

Christmas Celebration. Green Room, East 

Duke. 
8:00 p.m. Wesley Players Present "Rosmersholm." 

Methodist Center, Oregon Street. 
8:00 p.m. Divinity School Christmas Party. Trinity 

Methodist Church. 
8:00 p.m. Freshmen Basketball: Duke versus Wake 

Forest. Indoor Stadium. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Concert. Con- 
ductor: Allan Bone. Page Auditorium. Susan 

Starr, soloist. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar for January 3-11, 1964, 

should be submitted in WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, 

West Campus, not later than 12:00 noon on Thursday, January 2nd, 1964. 



Wednesday, December 18 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. Dean Robert E. 
Cushman. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Speaker: Dr. F. H. 
Bormann. Auditorium of Biological Sciences 
Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

6:00-8:30 p.m. Students Carol the Faculty. 

7:00 p.m. East Campus Christmas Vesper Services. 
East Duke Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:20 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "A Raisin in the Sun" with 
Sidney Poitier, Claudia McNeil and Ruby Dee. 
"Utterly magnificent, it has sharp wit, rich 
folk humor, high comedy, and solidly gripping 
drama." — Cue. "Very fine articulation of 
some of the basic dilemmas of the Negro race 
caught in the vise of resentment and insecurity. 
Brilliantly played. "— Crowther, N. Y. Times. 

8:00 p.m. Wesley Players Present " Rosmersholm. " 
Methodist Center, Oregon Street. 

Thursday, December 19 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. Thomas J. Howard. 

1:00 p.m. Final Examination of Mrs. Mary Ann 
Coslow Wimsatt for the Ph.D. degree in Eng- 
lish. Room 312 Allen Building. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
Robert R. Schmidt. Room M-204 Medical 
Center. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:00 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke versus Uni- 
versity of Virginia. Indoor Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, December 20 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Holy Communion. Dean Robert E. Cushman, 

Celebrant. 
12:30 p.m. Christmas Recess Begins. 
7:00 p.m. Faculty Club Annual Christmas Party. 

The Great Hall. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Wednesday, 12:45 
P.M., Baptist Center, Dr. Irving Alexander, Professor 
of Psychology at Duke, will speak on the topic : ' ' The 
Psychology of Death." All interested persons are 
invited. Lunch will be served at 12:15 P.M.; cost, 
$1.00. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION: Sunday, 
6:00 P.M., Green Room in East Duke Building, 
Christmas Program — selected readings from W. H. 
Auden's For the Time Being. Refreshments and 
fellowship will follow. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9:00 A.M., Fresh- 
man Forum ; 6 :00 P.M., Evening Prayer — the Duke 
University Brass Ensemble will present a program of 
Christmas music ; 9 :30 P.M., Yule Party. The Uni- 
versity community is welcome at both of these events. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: 
Sunday, 5 :00 P.M., The UCCF will meet at the home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Donald Fluke, 2703 Sevier Street, for 
a Christmas party. After dinner the group will go 
caroling. Transportation will leave the Chapel, East 
Campus circle and Hanes House at 4 :45 P.M. Thurs- 
day, 12 :40 P.M., Luncheon at Gilbert-Addoms Dining 
Hall on East Campus. 

WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, Meet at 
Presbyterian Student Center at 6 :15 P.M. The group 
will then go Christmas caroling, with refreshments 
afterwards at Chaplain Johnson's home. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, Decem- 
ber 15th, in the University Chapel. His subject will 
be "Bethlehem and Bedlam." The order of worship 
follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University 
Lector: Miss Barbara Benedict, Associate Director of Religious 

Life, East Campus 
Opening Organ Voluntary — "How Brightly 

Shines the Morning Star ' ' Buxtehude 

Choral Call to Worship — "Fanfare for Christmas Day" 

Martin Shaw 
Hymn of Adoration—' ' What Child Is This, 

Who, Laid to Rest" Old English Melody 

Prayers of Confession and for Pardon 
Words of Assurance 
The Lord's Prayer 

Anthem — "O nata lux de lumine" Thomas Tallis 

Scripture Lesson — Luke 2:1-7; John 1:1-5 
Hymn — "O Little Town of Bethlehem" Lewis H. Bedner 

Call to Prayer 
Prayer of Thanksgiving 
Prayers of Intercession and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem— " Glory To God In The Highest" 

Randall Thompson 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — "Bethlehem and Bedlam" 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Sevenfold Amen" John Stainer 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Toccata on 

"Vom Himmel Hoch" Edmitnson 

The next two Sundays fall within the Christmas 
academic recess. Therefore, the regular University 
Service of Worship will not be conducted on December 



[21 



22nd and 29th. Instead, a half-hour service is 
scheduled for each of those two Sundays, beginning at 
11 :00 a.m. These services will consist of organ music, 
Scripture readings and prayers. 



BRASS QUINTET 
The Brass Quintet which has been accompanying 
the Carillon this week is directed by R. R. Trevarthen 
of the Department of Music. The Quintet is composed 
of the following undergraduates: Edward Keller, 
trumpet ; Ron Vaughn, trumpet ; Ben Peck, trombone ; 
Tom Anderson, baritone ; and Jim Rivera, tuba. 



CHRISTMAS IN WORD AND MUSIC 
"Christmas in "Word and Music" will again be 
presented in the University Chapel next Sunday eve- 
ning, December 15th, beginning at 8 :00 p.m. Com- 
posed and presented for the first time three years ago, 
it has been repeated each year since, by popular re- 
quest. Consisting of selections from the finest Christ- 
mas music, the most representative Scriptural recitals 
of Christmas, and beloved carols, the service of wor- 
ship gives the prophecy of the coming of Jesus Christ, 
and the fulfillment of that prophecy. Choral music 
will be presented by the Men's Chorus and the Wom- 
en's Chorus. A variety of instrumental music will be 
included. The Presiding Minister will be the Rever- 
end Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel and 
James B. Duke Professor of Preaching. The reader 
will be the Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 
Chaplain to the University. Musical and choral por- 
tions of the service will be under the supervision of 
Mr. George Troutwein, Director of the Men's and 
Women's Choruses, and Mr. Prank Jordan, Organist. 



TEACHER EDUCATION ACCREDITATION 
On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, December 
16th, 17th and 18th, a committee representing the 
North Carolina State Board of Education will be visit- 
ing the campus for the purpose of evaluating our 
programs for the preparation of teachers and other 
school personnel. The committee of twenty persons 
will include representatives from all the school sub- 
jects and positions in connection with which Duke 
University prepares personnel. The committee will 
include professors of liberal arts and of education from 
various North Carolina institutions of higher learning, 
public school personnel, and representatives of the 
State Department of Public Instruction. The chair- 
man will be Dr. A. C. Dawson, Executive Secretary 
of the North Carolina Education Association, formerly 
Superintendent of Schools in Southern Pines. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, December 16th in the auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building at 4 :15 p.m. Dr. 
Bruce L. Welch, College of William and Mary, Wil- 
liamsburg, Virginia, will speak on "The Psychophys- 
iological Regulation and Identity of Populations." 
Coffee and tea will be served in the fover. 



LECTURE SERIES ON 
CURRENT ECONOMIC PROBLEMS 
James B. Duke Professor of Economics, Dr. Calvin 
B. Hoover, will speak in the Lecture Room Building 
9 on Monday, December 16th at 8 -.00 p.m. His topic 
will be "Slowdown in Soviet Economic Growth? A 
Comparison of Recent Trends in the U.S. and 
U.S.S.R. " This lecture, sponsored by the Department 
of Economics and Business Administration, is the first 
in a series of current economic problems. Succeeding 
topics and speakers include: "The Tax Cut" — Pro- 
fessor William P. Yohe in February, 1964; "Popula- 
tion Problems" — James B. Duke Professor Joseph J. 
Spengler in March, 1964; and "Automation" — Pro- 
fessor Juanita Kreps in April, 1964. The public is 
cordially invited. 



WESLEY PLAYERS PRESENT 
ROSMERSHOLM 

Wesley Players, the drama group of the Methodist 
Student Center, will present the play, " Rosmerskolm " 
by Heinrik Ibsen on Monday, Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, December 16th, 17th and 18th at 8 :00 p.m. in the 
Methodist Center on Oregon Street. The play is about 
a former clergyman who is so bound by his past that 
he is unable to act freely in the present. Admission 
will be $1.00. 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 
There will be a Mathematics Seminar on Tuesday, 
December 17th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 114 Physics 
Building. Dr. William R. Hare will be the speaker. 
His subject will be "Undergraduate Honors Program 
and Independent Study" with a student demonstra- 
tion. Coffee will be served at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 120 
Phvsics Building. 



CHRISTMAS VESPERS 

The annual Christmas Vespers will be observed in 
the Duke Chapel on Tuesday evening, December 17th, 
from 7 :00-8 :00 p.m. Participating in the service will 
be Dr. Waldo Beach of the Divinity School, Reader; 
the Duke Madrigal Singers, directed by Eugenia 
Saville of the Music Department ; the Duke Recorders 
Group ; and the University Carilloneur. Preceded by 
Carillon music from the Chapel Tower, the service of 
poetry and choral music appropriate to the season 
will be observed in candlelight. Members of the Uni- 
versity Community and friends are invited to join us 
in this service. 



DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

The Fall Concert of the Duke Symphony Orches- 
tra, originally scheduled for Friday, November 22nd, 
has been rescheduled for Tuesday, December 17th at 
8:15 in page Auditorium. Allan Bone will conduct. 
Featured on the program will be guest pianist, Susan 
Starr, who will perform with the Orchestra the 
' ' Concerto No. 4 in G Major for Piano and Orchestra, 

[3] 



Opus 58" by Beethoven. Miss Starr is an interna- 
tionally known young pianist and a winner in 1962 of 
the International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, 
and has performed extensively both here and abroad. 

Admission will be the presentation of a Duke 
Symphony Orchestra season ticket or the purchase of 
a one dollar ticket at the door. Advance ticket sales 
will be in Room 106 Asbury Building at fifty cents 
each. 

The program will be as follows : 

Toccata (Adagio) and Fugue in C Major Bach-Weiner 

Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Opus 93 Beethoven 

Allegro vivace e con brio 
Allegretto scherzando 
Tempo di Menuetto 
Allegro vivace 

Intermission 
Concerto No. 4 in G Major for Piano and Orchestra, Opus 58 

Beethoven 
Allegro moderato 
Andante con moto 
Rondo: Vivace 

Susan Starr, Soloist 
Variations, Chaconne and Finale (1948) Norman Dello Joio 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
December 18th at 4:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. F. H. Bormann will 
speak on "Non-competitive Relationships Between 
Root-grafted Trees." 

After graduating from Rutgers University, Dr. 
Bormann received his MA. and Ph.D. in Botany at 
Duke. He taught at Emory University before going 
to Dartmouth, from which he is presently on leave as 
a Senior Research Associate at Brookhaven National 
Laboratory. Refreshments will be served in the foyer 
at 4 :00 p.m. 



STUDENTS CAROL THE FACULTY 

On "Wednesday evening, December 18th, the Stu- 
dent Union will again provide transportation for 
students to carol the faculty and invite all the families 
living in the areas near the campus to come out and 
join the singing. 

Buses, bearing the carollers reinforced with a brass 
quartet, will circle through the nearby areas stopping 
for singing at the following locations and times: 

6:00 p.m. Assembling — Chapel Steps 

7:15 p.m. First Stop — Corner Woodburn Eoad and Dogwood 

Road 
8:15 p.m. Second Stop — Corner Wrightwood and Dwire 

(Refreshments will be served here) 
8:30 p.m. Return to Campus 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mrs. Mary Ann Coslow 
Wimsatt for the Ph.D. degree in English will be held 
on Thursda.v, December 19th at 1 :00 p.m. in Room 312 
Allen Building. The subject of Mrs. Wimsatt 's dis- 
sertation is "The Comic Sense of William Gilmore 
Simms: A Study of the Humor in His Fiction and 
Drama." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Arlin Turner, Bernard I. 
Duffey, Louis J. Budd, Lionel Stevenson and Richard 



L. Watson (minor field). Professor Turner will 
preside. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING COOK BOOK 

The School of Nursing Alumnae Association has 
compiled and published a cook book "Gothic Gour- 
met." This cook book includes recipes not only from 
nursing alumnae, but also from wives and members of 
the University faculty. All proceeds derived from the 
sale of these cook books will be applied to the Florence 
K. Wilson Scholarship Fund, School of Nursing. 

Cook books may be purchased from the Alumnae 
Office and in Hanes House where they will cost $2.00 
each copv. If the books are to be mailed it will cost 
$2.25. 



DUKE FACULTY CLUB 
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARTY 

The Annual Christmas Party of the Duke Faculty 
Club will take place on Friday, December 20th at 
6 :30 p.m. The faculty will assemble and check wraps 
in Flowers Building Lounge. Dinner will be served 
promptly at 7:00 p.m. in The Great Hall (formerly 
referred to as Dining Halls B and C) of the Union 
Building. 

The banquet will follow the traditional Elizabethan 
theme with the Boar's Head Procession and special 
music. 

All tickets for members and guests may be obtained 
in person or by mail from the office of Mr. Floyd 
Sawyer, Room 304 Allen Building prior to 5 :00 p.m. 
on Tuesday, December 17th. 



SCHEDULE FOR 
UNIVERSITY WEEKLY CALENDAR 

Deadline for notices to appear in the first edition 
of the new year, the week of January 3-11, is 12 :00 
noon, Thursday, January 2, 1964. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
BACH ARIA GROUP 

The Bach Aria Group will perform on Tuesday, 
February 4th at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium under 
the auspices of the Artists Series. The only perform- 
ing organization of its kind, possessing an unusual 
feature in that it places instrumental and vocal soloists 
on equal footing, the Bach Aria Group consists of 
famed singers Eileen Farrell, soprano ; Carol Smith, 
alto ; Jan Peerce, tenor ; and Norman Farrow, bass- 
baritone — and equally distinguished instrumentalists 
Julius Baker, flute ; Robert Bloom, oboe ; Bernard 
Greenhouse, cello ; Oscar Shumsky, violin ; and Paul 
Ulanowsky, piano. It is a combination Avithout 
parallel of virtuosi who have come together to pre- 
sent the most tuneful music that Bach ever wrote. 
Performances by this unique ensemble have taken 
them _ through the United States, Canada, South 
America and Europe. 

Remaining tickets are priced at $2.50 and $2.00 and 
are available in Room 202-A Flowers Building or by 
calling Extension 2911. 



[4] 



FALL 1963-1964 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 

OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

ANY STUDENT HAVING A SCHEDULE OF THREE 
EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS OR 
TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME MUST 
REPORT TO THE DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER THAN 
January 6, 1964 TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN SCHEDULE. 



Friday 
January 10 


6:00- 7:00 p.m. 


Physical Education 


Monday 
January 13 


Reading Period 


No examination scheduled 


Tuesday 
January 14 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 

7: 00-10 :00 p.m. 


MWF4 

All Language 1 
Engineering 1.5-1.8 
Philosophy 48 


Wednesday 
January 15 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00p.m. 


MWF1 
MWF7 
Political Science 11, 61 


Thursday 
January 16 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 


Botany 1 
TTS3 
Physics 1, 41 


Friday 
January 17 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 

7:00-10:00 p.m. 


Chemistry 1, IX 
TT6 

Engineering 1.1-1.4 
Economics 57 


Saturday 
January 18 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00p.m. 


English 1 
MWF3 


Monday 
January 20 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 


MWF2 
History 1, IX 
Economics 51 


Tuesday 
January 21 


9:00-12:00 noon 

2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7: 00-10 :00 p.m. 


TTS5 

TT7 

TTS4 

Math 11, 21, 41 


Wednesday 
January 22 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 


MWF6 

French, Spanish 63 

TT8 


Thursday 
January 23 


9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 


TTS1 

Religion 1, IX 
TTS2 


Friday 
January 24 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 


MWF5 
Naval Science 



ENGINEERING COURSES, OTHER THAN ENGINEER- 
ING 1, WILL MEET FOR EXAMINATION AT THE 
REGULAR CLASS PERIODS. 

Chemistry (except Chemistry 1) and Zoology classes meet 
for examination at the time scheduled for their general lecture 
period. ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE 
FOREGOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE 
PERIOD BEGINNING January 14, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
January 24, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE 
GIVEN BEFORE 9:00 a.m., January 14, WITH THE EX- 
CEPTION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS 
TO BE MADE IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION 
WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 
University Schedule Committee 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology Seminar will meet 
on Thursday, December 19th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
M-204 Medical Center. Dr. Robert R. Schmidt of the 
Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute, will speak on "Metabolic Transi- 
tions during Cellular Development." 



FRENCH AND SPANISH EXAMINATIONS 
FOR GRADUATE DEGREES 

The French and Spanish examination for candi- 
dates for graduate degrees will be given on Friday, 
January 10th at 4:00 p.m. in Rooms 113 and 114 
Physics Building. Candidates should register for 
this examination no later than Friday, December 20th 
in the Graduate School Office 



UNIVERSITY SPRING ACTIVITIES 
CALENDAR NOTICE 

Announcements for the printed UNIVERSITY 
SPRING ACTIVITIES CALENDAR, compiled, 
published, aud distributed by the Student Union's 
Special Service Committee at the beginning of each 
semester, must be in Room 202-A Flowers Building 
by Wednesday, December 18th, in order to be in 
the printer's hands for a February first release. 
Faculty and staff members scheduling events for 
the Spring Semester are urged to get their an- 
nouncements in at once. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ERASMUS CLUB 

The next meeting of the Erasmus Club will be held 
on Friday, January 3rd at 8:00 p.m. in the Green 
Room of the East Duke Building. Professor Robert 
S. Rogers of the Classics Department will give a paper 
on "Two Studies on Tiberius: 1. Ateius Capito and 
Tiberius. 2. Tiberius and the Tiber." Everyone is 
cordially invited to attend. 



LIBRARY SCHEDULES 
CHRISTMAS RECESS 

The University Libraries will operate according to 
the following schedule during the Christmas Recess, 
December 20, 1963— January 2, 1964 : 

General Library 
Friday, Dec. 20 
Saturday, Dee. 21 
Sunday, Dee. 22 
Monday, Dec. 23 
Tuesday, Dec. 24 
Wednesday, Dec. 25 



8:00a.m.-5:00p.m. 
8:00a.m.-l:00p.m. 

Closed 
8 :00a.m.-5 :00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 

Closed 



Thursday, Dec. 26-Friday, Dec. 27 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 



8 :00a.m.-l :00 p.m. 
Closed 



Saturday, Dec. 28 

Sunday, Dec. 29 

Monday, Dee. 30-Tuesday, Dec. 31 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Wednesday, January 1, 1964 Closed 

Thursday, January 2 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Friday, January 3 Resume regular schedule 

All units of the General Library will be open ac- 
cording to the above schedule with the following ex- 
ceptions : 



Manuscripts Department 
Newspaper Department 
Rare Book Department 



Closed 12:00-1:00 each day 
Closed 12:00-1:00 each day 
Closed 12:00-1:00 each day 



Woman's College Library 
Friday, Dec. 20 
Saturday, Dec. 21 
Sunday, Dec. 22-Sunday, Dec. 29 
Monday, Dec. 30-Tuesday, Dec. 31 
Wednesday, Jan. 1, 1964 
Thursday, Jan. 2 
Friday, Jan. 3 

Christmas schedules for other University libraries 
will be posted. 



8:00 a.m.-5 :00 p.m. 
9:00 a.m.-l :00 p.m. 

Closed 
9:00 a.m. -5 :00 p.m. 

Closed 
9:00a,m.-5:00p.m. 
Resume regular schedule 



[5] 



WEEK OF 



Jan. 3-11, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Jan. 3-11, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Friday, January 3 

8:10 a.m. Classes Resume. 

2:00 p.m. Joint Zoology and Biophysics Seminar. 
Speaker: Dr. Stanley Person. Room 130, 
Biological Sciences Building. 

3:30 p.m. Physiology Seminar. Speaker : Dr. Neils 
Lassen. Room M-204 Medical Center. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women, 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 



Saturday, January 4 

6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke versus N. C. 
State. Indoor Stadium. 

7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Last Year at Marienbad" (In 
French with English sub-titles.) Directed by 
Alain Resnais. "Best Picture of Year" — 
Venice Film Festival. "Truly extraordinary! 
Be prepared for an experience such as you have 
never had. . . . full of beauty and mood. You 
should find it fascinating!" — Crowther, New 
York Times. 

8:15 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke versus N. C. 
State. Indoor Stadium. 

10:00-12:00 midnight. Student Union Candlelight 
Cabaret. Union Ballroom. 



Sunday, January 5 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 

Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor 
James T. Cleland. Sermon: "The Father of 
the Two Lost Boys." Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

Monday, January 6 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Department Seminar. Speaker: 
Professor Daniel C. Tosteson. Biological Sci- 
ences Building Auditorium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:00 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Speaker: Pro- 
fessor Robert S. Rogers. Green Room, East 
Duke Building. 

Tuesday, January 7 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Harmon L. Smith. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 
Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

2:00 p.m. Civil Engineering Seminar. Speaker: 
Professor Charles R. Vail. Room 232 Engi- 
neering Building. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar for January 12-18, 

should be submitted in WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, 

West Campus, not later than 12:00 noon on Wednesday, January 15, 1964. 



3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Robert S. Spira. Room 114 Physics Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 

Card Gymnasium. 

Wednesday, January 8 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. Harmon L. Smith. 
12:30 p.m. Faculty Club Luncheon Meeting. Union 
Ballroom. Speaker : Dr. W. C. Archie. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biological 
Sciences Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

6:00 p.m. Recognition Dinner for Recipients of 
Angier B. Duke Scholarships. West Union 
Ballroom. 

7:00-10:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge 
Club Meeting. Green Room, East Duke Build- 
ing. 

7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Pase 
Auditorium. "Last Year at Marienbad" (In 
French with English sub-titles.) Directed by 
Alain Resnais. "Best Picture of Year"— 
Venice Film Festival. ' ' Truly extraordinary ! 
Be prepared for an experience such as you have 
never had. . . . full of beauty and mood. You 
should find it fascinating!" — Crowther, New 
York Times. 

8:00 p.m. Josiah C. Trent Medical History Society. 

Speaker: Dr. Genevieve Miller. 1415 Bivins 

Street. 
8:15 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke versus Clemson. 

Clemson, S. C. 

Thursday, January 9 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. Grayson B. Watson. 

10:30 a.m. Final examination of Mr. Kenneth Webb 
for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. Library 
Conference Room. 

12:30 p.m. Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Michael Barbour. 

4:00 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council Meeting. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 



8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Friday, January 10 



York 



10:10 a.m. Divinity School Holy Communion. 
Chapel. Dr. Harmon Smith, Celebrant. 

4:30 p.m. Special Children's Concert by Duke Con- 
cert Band. Woman's College Auditorium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke versus U.N.C. 
Indoor Stadium. 



Saturday, January 11 

12:30 p.m. Fall Semester Classes End. 

2:00 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke versus U.N.C. 
Indoor Stadium, (televised) 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Last Year at Marienbad" (In 
French with English sub-titles.) Directed by 
Alain Resnais. "Best Picture of Year" — 
Venice Film Festival. "Truly extraordinary! 
Be prepared for an experience such as you 
have never had. . . . full of beauty and mood. 
You should find it fascinating!" — Crowther, 
New York Times. 

8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society Hungarian String 
Quartet. Music Room East Duke Building. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Friday, 6:15 P.M., 
Baptist Center, Supper and Worship. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 9:00 A.M., Fresh- 
man Forum; Discussion of The Cocktail Party, by 
T. S. Eliot; 4:00 P.M., Full Council meeting; 6:00 
P.M., Congregational Meal and Worship. Thursday, 
9:00 P.M., Seminar: "Contemporary Criticisms of 
Christianity." 

The State Conference of the North Carolina Meth- 
odist Student Movement will be held at Winston- 
Salem, February 7-9. Registration deadline is Janu- 
ary 15. Cost is $7.00. The major addresses will be 
given by the Rev. James Lawson of Memphis, 
Tennessee. For information contact the Methodist 
Center, 286-9230. 

WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: Sunday, Presby- 
terian Center, 6 :15 P.M., Vespers. 



[2] 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean 
of the Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University- 
Service of Worship at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday, Janu- 
ary 5th in the University Chapel. 

The order of worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University. 
Lector: The Reverend James W. Stines, Chaplain to Baptist 

Students. 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Prelude in F minor Bach 

Choral Call to Worship — ' ' The Lord Is In His Holy Temple ' ' 

Calvin W. Loafer 
Hymn of Adoration — "O God, Our Help In Ages Past" 

William Croft 
Prayers of Confession and for Pardon 
Words of Assurance 
The Lord 's Prayer 
Anthem — ' ' Holy, Holy, Holy ' ' from the Mass 

Aeterna Christi Munera G. P. da Palestrina 

Scripture Lesson — Luke 15:1-11 
Hymn — "O My Soul, Bless God, the Father" 

Adapted from the melody in Psalmodia Sacra 
Call to Prayer 
Prayer of Thanksgiving 
Prayers of Intercession and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "Rejoice in the Lord Alway" (The Bell Anthem) 

Henry Purcell 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 

Sermon — ' ' The Father of the Two Lost Boys ' ' 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — ' ' Sevenfold Amen ' ' John Stainer 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Fugue in F minor Bach 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, January 12th is the Reverend Dr. Howard C. 
Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University and Director of 
Religious Activities. 



JOINT ZOOLOGY AND BIOPHYSICS SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology and the Committee on 
Biophysics will hold a seminar on Fridav, January 
3rd at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 130 of the Biological Sci- 
ences Building. Dr. Stanley Person, Department of 
Biophysics, Pennsylvania State University, will speak 
on "Differential Mutation Production by the Decay 
of Incorporated Tritium Compounds in E. coli." 
After the seminar those interested may adjourn to a 
laboratory for further demonstration of this work. 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology will hold a seminar 
on Friday, January 3rd at 3 :30 p.m. in Room M-204 
Medical Center. Dr. Neils Lassen from Copenhagen 
will speak on "The Use of Radioactive Xenon for the 
Measurement of Regional Blood Flow." 



ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The next meeting of the Erasmus Club will be 
held on Monday, January 6th, at 8:00 p.m. in the 
Green Room of the East Ditke Building. Professor 



Robert S. Rogers of the Classics Department will give 
a paper on "Two Studies on Tiberius: 1. Ateius 
Capito and Tiberius. 2. Tiberius and the Tiber." 
Everyone is cordially invited to attend. 



ZOOLOGY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its seminar on 
Monday, January 6th in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Professor 
Daniel C. Tosteson, Department of Physiology, will 
speak on "Enzymatic Basis of Active Transport of 
Na and Kin Sheep Red Cell Membrane." Coffee and 
tea will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 

There will be a Mathematics Seminar on Tuesday, 
January 7th at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 114 Physics Build- 
ing. Dr. Robert S. Spira, Research Associate, Special 
Research in Numerical Analysis, Duke University 
will speak on ' ' Introduction to the Four Color Prob- 
lem and a New Result," Coffee will be served in 
Room 120 Physics Building at 3 :30 p.m. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING SEMINAR 

Dr. Charles R. Vail, Chairman and Professor of 
Electrical Engineering, will present a seminar spon- 
sored by the Department of Civil Engineering entitled 
"An Electrical Engineer's View of Materials" on 
Tuesday, January 7th, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 232 of 
the Engineering Building. All members of the faculty, 
undergraduate and graduate students are invited to 
attend. 



FACULTY CLUB LUNCHEON MEETING 

The Faculty Club will meet at luncheon on Wednes- 
day, January 8th at 12 :30 p.m. in the Union Ball- 
room. Dr. W. C. Archie, Director of Higher Educa- 
tion in the Department of Education of the State of 
North Carolina, will be the speaker. Dr. Archie's 
topic will be "Recent Developments in Public Higher 
Education in North Carolina." 



RECOGNITION DINNER FOR RECIPIENTS 
ANGIER B. DUKE SCHOLARSHIP 

The annual recognition dinner honoring the re- 
cipients of the Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarships 
will be held on Wednesday, January 8th, at 6 :00 p.m. 
in the West Union Ballroom. Dean Alan K. Man- 
chester, Chairman of the Angier B. Duke Memorial 
Scholarship Committee, will address the group ; the 
response will be made by Mr. Joseph Allen, executive 
assistant to the chairman of the Duke Endowment and 
assistant to the president of the Angier B. Duke 
Memorial, Inc. Special guests will include President 
Douglas M. Knight and the officers of the Angier B. 
Duke Memorial, Inc. 



[3] 



JOSIAH C. TRENT MEDICAL HISTORY 
SOCIETY 

Dr. Genevieve Miller, Curator of the Howard 
Dittrick Museum of Historical Medicine of Cleveland, 
will speak to the Josiah C. Trent Medical History 
Society at the home of Dr. and Mrs. James H. 
Semaiis, 1415 Bivins Street, on Wednesday, January 
8th at 8:00 p.m. Her subject will be, "The Unicorn 
and Medicine. ' ' Those who will attend are requested 
to call Mr. Kelly in the Trent Room of the Medical 
Center Library, extension 3505. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on January 8th, 
at 4 :15 p.m. in the auditorium of the Biological Sci- 
ences Building. Dr. Edward G. Barry, Assistant 
Professor of Botany at the University of North Caro- 
lina will speak on "Chromosome Aberations of 
Neurospora crassa." Refreshments will be served in 
the foyer at 4 p.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Kenneth Webb for 
the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Thursday, 
January 9th at 10 :30 a.m. in the Library Conference 
Room. The subject of Mr. Webb 's dissertation is ' ' The 
Political Thought of Samuel Rutherford." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Waldo Beach, Robert E. Cushman, Ray C. 
Petry, H. Shelton Smith, and John H. Hallowell, 
minor field. Professor Beach will preside. 



ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Ecology Seminar will be held on Thursday, 
January 9th, at 12 :30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Michael Barbour, graduate stu- 
dent in plant ecology, will speak on "Early Growth of 
Annual and Perennial Rye Grass." All interested 
persons are cordially invited to attend. 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 

There will be an Undergraduate Faculty Council 
meeting on Thursday, January 9th at 4:00 p.m 
Room 208 Flowers Building. 



m 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
HUNGARIAN STRING QUARTET 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the third 
concert of its season, to be played by the Hungarian 
String Quartet on Saturday, January 11th, at 8 :15 
p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. The 
concert is the thirteenth to be presented here by the 
Hungarian Quartet, the first being in December, 1948. 
The musicians are Zoltan Szekely and Michael Kuttner 



(Violins), Denes Koromzay (Viola) and Gabriel 
Magyar (Cello). The Program follows : 

Haydn Quartet in F major, Opus 3, No. 5 ("Serenade") 

Franek Quartet in D major 

Bartok Fifth Quartet (1934) 

Other Chamber Music Concerts scheduled this 

season include : 

February 8 (Saturday) Quartetto Italiano 

March 21 (Saturday) Fine Arts Quartet 

April 11 (Saturday) New York String Sextet 

Admission : 

All membership cards for the current season are 
subscribed. A guest card for a single admission to 
any one concert costs $2.50. About 60 guest cards 
are available for each concert; they may be obtained 
at the Music Room door from 7 :30 to 8 :00 p.m. on 
concert evenings. Inquiries may be addressed to 
Chamber Arts Society, c/o Ernest W. Nelson, Box 
6065, College Station. 



SPECIAL CHILDREN'S CONCERT BY 
DUKE CONCERT BAND 

The Duke Concert Band, composed of sixty-five 
Duke musicians under the direction of Paul Bryan, 
will give a Special Children's Concert on Friday, 
January 10th at 4 :30 p.m. in the Woman 's College 
Auditorium. Admission will be free for all. This 
concert has been arranged through the cooperation 
of Professor Paul Bryan, the Department of Music 
and the special committee of the Durham Chapter 
of the N. C. Symphony Society under the chairman- 
ship of Mrs. Max Samfield. 

The program follows: 

National Emblem March Bagley 

1912 Overture Iain Hamilton 

Aria — Care Selve Handel 

Victory at Sea Richard Sogers 

The Man Who Invented Music Don Gillis 

(written for narrator and band and introduces the various 

instruments) 

Mexican Dance "La Bomba Veracruz" Titcci 

Valzen Campestro Marinuzzi 

(feature the English Horn) 
Cornfeds Paul Bryan 

(march based on Confederate tunes: "Yellow Rose of 

Texas," "Join the Cavalry," "Lorena.") 



ART EXHIBITIONS 



The Department of Art and the Student Union 
Fine Arts Committee announce two new exhibits for 
the East and West Gallery areas which may be seen 
during January 6-31 between the hours of 8 :00 a.m. 
and 10 :00 p.m. 

A collection of early book art, a traveling exhibi- 
tion on loan from the North Carolina Museum of Art 
in Raleigh, is currently on display in the East Gallery 
of the Woman's College Library. 

The collection contains 39 book leaves, all from the 
15th and 16th centuries. Thirteen are vellum sheets 
from hand-written and hand-illuminated manuscripts, 
with one of these, a calendar page from a Book of 
Hours, estimated to date to 1430. 

The remaining leaves are early printed pages, em- 
bellished with woodcuts, except for two early Bible 



[4] 



pages that display only hand-illuminated initials. 
Thirteen of these printed pages come from the 15th 
century, several from the 1470 's, only 30 years 
after Gutenberg's first printed Bible and only ten 
years after woodcut illustrations were introduced. 

North Carolina Museum of Art director Dr. Justus 
Bier calls the book art items "examples of a minor 
art, but great works of art nevertheless." He points 
out that the traveling exhibition "will bring to the 
galleries of the State works which can rival in quality 
the best of all times." 

A second appropriation from the Reby Lewis 
Purchase Fund aided in the purchase of the book art 
collection. The first appropriation, in 1961, also went 
toward a traveling exhibition, a collection of graphic 
art drawn from the artists of North Carolina and 
called North Carolina Printmakers. 

A one man show of photographs by Leonard 
Kamsler, '57, formerly of Raleigh and now a free 
lance feature photographer in New York may be seen 
in the gallery area of "West Union Building. Mr. 
Kamsler has specialized in the area of photography in 
sports and commercial and educational enterprises. A 
major contributor to "Golf" and "Ski" magazines he 
has also been featured in "Sports Illustrated," "This 
"Week," "Pageant," "Coronet" and numerous com- 
mercial publications. 

As an undergraduate at Duke, Mr. Kamsler was 
chief photographer for the Chanticleer, sports and 
feature editor for the Chronicle and did feature work 
for Archive and Peer. His color filming of Camp Sea- 
gull activities was his first manor commercial effort 
and will be recalled particularly by those in this area. 
His work was last seen in a one man show on the 
campus in 1957. More recently he has contributed to 
the Duke Alumni Register. 



RE-REGISTRATION OF AUTOMOBILES 

Vehicle registration emblems for faculty, staff, and 
employees expire February 29, 1964. Some faculty, 
staff, and employees have registered their vehicles and 
received a registration emblem with an expiration 
date of February 28, 1967. All Duke University 
faculty, staff, and employees whose current vehicle 
registration emblems bear an expiration date of Feb- 
ruary 29, 1964 must re-register the vehicle and dis- 
play the new registration emblem on the rear bumper 
of the vehicle by March 1, 1964. 

Registration places are : 

1. Hospital and Medical School personnel, includ- 
ing all faculty, staff, and employees, register at the 
office of the Personnel Director, Room 1160 Duke 
University Medical Center. 

2. All other faculty, staff, and emplovees register 
at the Traffic Office, 05 Allen Building. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David Gerke for the 
Ph.D. degree in Physics was held on Monday. Decem- 
ber 23rd, at 7 :30 p.m. in Room 218 Physics Building. 



The subject of Mr. Gerke 's dissertation was 
"C 12 (d,p)C 13 : Distorted "Wave Born Approximation 
Analysis of Proton Angular Distributions and Proton- 
Gamma Angular Correlations." The committee who 
conducted the examination consisted of Professors 
Henry W. Newson, L. C. Biedenharn, Ronald Tilley, 
and F. G. Dressel, Mathematics. Professor Newson 
presided. 



S. U. FINE ARTS FILM FESTIVAL 
RE-SCHEDULE 

The Student Union Fine Arts Film Festival 
originally scheduled for Tuesday, January 7th has 
been re-scheduled for Thursday, February 20th at 
7 :30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. It will be open to 
the public without charge. 



DELEGATE HOUSING NEEDED 
FOR U. N. MODEL ASSEMBLY 

The Middle South United Nations Model General 
Assembly, which parallels the organization and func- 
tioning of the U. N. itself, will be held on the Duke 
Campus February 12th-15th. Delegates representing 
various U. N. member nations are expected to number 
nearly 400 from at least 50 colleges and universities. 

All faculty and staff members have been contacted 
and asked to assist in housing the delegates for the 
three-clay assembly. The Secretariat would like to re- 
quest University Community members who would be 
able to house one or more delegates to please return 
the card sent them by the Housing Committee or call 
extension 2909. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

STUDY GROUP ON PROBLEMS OF 

WORLD ORDER 

An informal study group on disarmament and the 
development of world order will meet at the World 
Rule of Law Center during the spring semester. The 
study group, led by Daniel G. Partan, Research Asso- 
ciate at the Center, will discuss defense policy, the 
regulation of the threat or use of force in internation- 
al relations, the effectiveness of present peace-keeping 
machinery, and arms control and disarmament pro- 
posals. There will be twelve meetings on Monday 
evenings, 8 :00-9 :30 p.m., beginning February 3rd, at 
the World Rule of Law Center, Room 201, Law 
School. The group will use mimeographed materials 
and selections from Legal and Political Problems of 
World Order, compiled and edited by Professor Saul 
H. Mendlovitz of Rutgers University Law School, and 
from World Peace Through World Law, a compre- 
hensive plan for revision of the Charter of the United 
Nations developed by Grenville Clark and Louis B. 
Sohn. Both books and other assigned readings will be 
available to study group participants at a special com- 
bined price of five dollars. Interested persons are 
urged to contact Mr. Partan at the World Rule of 
Law Center, extension 3518. The study group will be 
limited to fifteen persons. 



f5] 



VOTING ASSISTANCE 

CORE members and other faculty and students 
with ears interested in transporting prospective Negro 
voters to places of registration on Saturday, January 
4th, are requested to call Mr. John Edwards, 682-8106 
or 688-5445 after 10 :00 p.m. ; Mr. Ellis D. Jones, Jr. 
681-2006 ; or meet in front of the Chapel at 1 :00 p.m. 
on Saturday, January 4th. 



FALL 1963-1964 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 

OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

ANY STUDENT HAVING A SCHEDULE OF THREE 
EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS OR 
TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME MUST 
REPORT TO THE DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATEB THAN 
January 6, 1964 TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN SCHEDULE. 

Friday 

January 10 6:00- 7:00 p.m. Physical Education 



Monday 
January 13 


Reading Period 


No examination scheduled 


Tuesday 
January 14 


9 = 00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 

7:00-10:00p.m. 


MWF4 
All Language 1 
Engineering 1.5-1.8 
Philosophy 48 


Wednesday 
January 15 


9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 


MWF1 
MWF7 
Political Science 11, 61 


Thursday 
January 16 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 


Botany 1 
TTS3 
Phrsics 1, 41 


Friday 
January 17 


9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 

7:00-10:00 p.m. 


Chemistry 1, IX 
TT6 

Engineering 1.1-1.4 
Economics 57 


Saturday 
January 18 


9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 


English 1 
MWF3 


Monday 
January 20 


9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7: 00-10 :00 p.m. 


MWF2 
History 1, IX 
Economics 51 



Tuesday 


9: 00-12: 00 noon 


TTS5 


January 21 




TT7 




2:00- 5:00 p.m. 


TTS4 




7:00-10:00 p.m. 


Math 11, 21, 41 



Wednesday 
January 22 



9: 00-12: 00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 



MWF6 

French, Spanish 63 

TT8 



Thursday 
January 23 



9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 



TTS1 

Religion 1, IX 
TTS2 



Friday 
January 24 



9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 



MWF5 
Naval Science 



ENGINEERING COURSES, OTHER THAN ENGINEER- 
ING 1, WILL MEET FOR EXAMINATION AT THE 
REGULAR CLASS PERIODS. 

Chemistry (except Chemistry 1) and Zoology classes meet 
for examination at the time scheduled for their general lecture 
period. ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE 
FOREGOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE 
PERIOD BEGINNING January 14, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
January 24, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE 
GIVEN BEFORE 9:00 a.m., January 14, WITH THE EX- 
CEPTION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS 
TO BE MADE IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION 
WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 
University Schedule Committee 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
BACH ARIA GROUP 

The Bach Aria Group will perform on Tuesday, 
February 4th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium under 
the auspices of the Artists Series. The only perform- 
ing organization of its kind, possessing an unusual 
feature in that it places instrumental and vocal soloists 
on equal footing, the Bach Aria Group consists of 
famed singers Eileen Farrell, soprano; Carol Smith, 
alto; Jan Peerce, tenor; and Norman Farrow, bass- 
baritone — and equally distinguished instrumentalists 
Julius Baker, flute ; Robert Bloom, oboe ; Bernard 
Greenhouse, cello ; Oscar Shumsky, violin ; and Paul 
Ulanowsky, piano. It is a combination without 
parallel of virtuosi who have come together to pre- 
sent the most tuneful music that Bach ever wrote. 
Performances by this unique ensemble have taken 
them through the United States, Canada, South 
America and Europe. 

Remaining tickets are priced at $2.50 and $2.00 and 
are available in Room 202-A Flowers Building or by 
calling Extension 2911. 



WEEK OF 



Jan. 12-18, 1964 



CALENDAR 

OF 



WEEK OF 



Jan. 12-18,1964 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, January 12 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Howard 
C. Wilkinson. Sermon: "Savonarola in the 
Duke Chapel." Broadcast over Radio Station 
WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

Monday, January 13 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Professor 
Irving T. Diamond. Auditorium Biological 
Sciences Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Tuesday, January 14 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
2:00 p.m." Final Examination of Mr. Ralph R. 

Napp for the Ed.D. degree in Education. 

Room 08A West Duke Building. 
3:00 p.m. Campus Club Tea. Home of Dr. and 

Mrs. Knight, 2138 Campus Dr. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 



Wednesday, January 15 

4:30 p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Psychology Colloquium 
Meeting Room 130, Building XL 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:08 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Crooks Anonymous" with 
Wilfrid Hyde White and James Robertson 
Justice. An irresistibly funny piece of English 
fluff for the exam period. 

Thursday, January 16 

2:15 p.m. Physics Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. N. R. 
Werthamer. Room 114 Physics Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. Society of Friends Meeting. Friends 
Meeting House, Alexander Ave. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, January 17 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:00 p.m. Newcomers' Club Meeting. Speaker: 
Mrs. James H. Semans. Music Room East 
Duke Building. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar for January 19-25, 

should be submitted in WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, 

West Campus, not later than 12:00 noon on Wednesday, January 15, 1964. 



Saturday, January 18 

7:08 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Crooks Anonymous" with 
"Wilfrid Hyde White and James Robertson 
Justice. An irresistibly funny piece of English 
fluff for the exam period. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER: Sunday, 1:45 P.M., Rides leave 
East and West circles for Murdoch School at Butner: 
teaching and recreation with the mentally retarded. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER: Sunday, 9:30 A.M., Holy 
Communion. Wednesday, 7 :10 A.M. and 5 :30 P.M., 
Holy Communion. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 6:00 P.M., Eve- 
ning Prayer ; Cranf ord Johnson, Preacher. 

The Methodist Center invites members of the Uni- 
versity community to make use of its facilities for 
study during the examination period. 

The State Convention of the North Carolina Meth- 
odist Student Movement will be held at Winston- 
Salem, February 7-9. Registration deadline is Janu- 
ary 15. Cost is $7.50. The major addresses will be 
given by the Rev. James Lawson of Memphis, Ten- 
nessee. For information contact the Methodist Center, 
286-9230. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER: Sunday, 6:20 P.M., 
Service of Holy Communion. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain 
to the University, will deliver the sermon at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, 
January 12th in the University Chapel. 

The order of worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, 
Dean of the Chapel. 

Lector: The Reverend Charles E. Johnson, Chaplain to Presby- 
terian Students. 

Opening Organ Voluntary — Suite from the "Water Music" 

Handel 

Choral Call to Worship—' ' The Lord Is in His Holy Temple ' ' 

Calvin W. Laufer 

Hymn of Adoration — "O for a Thousand Tongues To Sing" 

Carl G. Glasser 
Arr. oy Lowell Mason 

Prayers of Confession and for Pardon 

Words of Assurance 

The Lord's Prayer 

Anthem — " Elegischer Gesang" Beethoven 

Scripture Lesson — I Corinthians 6 (selected verses) 

Hymn — "The Church's One Foundation" Samuel S. Wesley 

Call to Prayer 

Prayer of Thanksgiving 

Prayers of Intercession and Petition 

The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — ' ' O Sing Unto the Lord ' ' Henry Parcell 

Response — The Doxology 

Prayer of Dedication 

Sermon — "Savonarola in the Puke Chapel" 

Prayer 

Benediction 

Choral Response — "Sevenfold Amen" John Siainer 

The Chimes 

Closing Orp-an Voluntary — Carillon Vierne 



The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship Next 
Sunday, January 19th, is the Reverend Dr. Stuart C. 
Henry, Associate Professor of American Christianity, 
in the Divinity School. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold a seminar on 
Monday, January 13th in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Professor 
Irving T. Diamond, Department of Psychology, will 
speak on "The Functions of Homologous Neural 
Structures." Coffee and tea will be served in the 
foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE ED.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Ralph R. Napp for 
the Ed.D. degree in Education will be held on Tues- 
day, January 14th at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 08A West 
Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Napp's disserta- 
tion is "Isolation and Analysis of Certain Factors 
which may Influence Students to Enroll at East 
Carolina College." The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors William H. Cart- 
wright, E. C. Bolmeier, W. Scott Gehman, Everett 
Hopkins, and Donald F. Roy. Professor Cartwright 
will preside. 



CAMPUS CLUB TEA 



The Campus Club will honor Honorary Members 
at a tea on Tuesday, January 14th from 3 :00 p.m. to 
5 :00 p.m. at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Douglas 
Knight, 2138 Campus Drive. 

Special guests for the occasion will be the mothers 
of Campus Club members and faculty, all of whom 
are cordially invited. Mrs. J. H. Saylor is Chairman 
of the tea and Mrs. Robert Cushman is Program 
Chairman, with the departments of Air Science, 
Chemistry and English serving as hostesses. 



JOINT DUKE-UNC PSYCHOLOGY 
COLLOQUIUM 

The joint Duke-UNC Psychology Colloquium will 
meet on Wednesday January 15 at 4 :30 p.m. in room' 
130, building XI. Dr. Norman T. Fether of the Uni- 
versity of New England, N.S.W., Australia, will speak 
on "A Structural Balance Model of Communication 
Effects." 



PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM 

There will be a Physics Colloquium on Thursday, 
January 16th at 2 :15 p.m. in Room 114 Physics 
Building. Dr. N. R. Werthamer, Bell Telephone 
Laboratories, will speak on "Boundary Effect in 
Superconductors. ' ' 



2] 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS MEETING 

The Society of Friends will hold a business meet- 
ing on Thursday, January 16th at 7 :30 p.m. at Friends 
Meeting House on Alexander Avenue. The meeting 
will be preceded by a potluck supper at 6 :00 p.m. For 
information call Mrs. Martha Klopfer, 286-5898. 



NEWCOMERS' CLUB MEETING 

The Duke University Newcomers' Club will meet 
on Thursday, January 16th at 8 :00 p.m. in the Music 
Room of East Duke Building. Mrs. James H. Semans, 
an alumna, a trustee, and a member of Duke Univer- 
sity's founding family, will speak to the group on 
"The Story of Duke University." A reception will 
follow the program in the Mary Duke Biddle and 
Alumni Rooms. Members are invited to bring their 
husbands or a guest to the event. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
GERONTOLOGY COUNCIL 

The Gerontology Council will meet on Tuesday, 
January 21st at 5 :00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. Richard L. Strecker, Visiting Professor of 
Law, Vanderbilt University will speak on the subject 
' ' Aging and Tax Policy. ' ' All interested persons are 
cordially invited to attend. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

STUDY GROUP ON PROBLEMS OF 

WORLD ORDER 

An informal study group on disarmament and the 
development of world order will meet at the World 
Rule of Law Center during the spring semester. The 
study group, led by Daniel G. Partan, Research Asso- 
ciate at the Center, will discuss defense policy, the 
regulation of the threat or use of force in internation- 
al relations, the effectiveness of present peace-keeping 
machinery, and arms control and disarmament pro- 
posals. There will be twelve meetings on Monday 
evenings, 8 :00-9 :30 p.m., beginning February 3rd, at 
the World Rule of Law Center, Room 201, Law 
School. The group will use mimeographed materials 
and selections from Legal and Political Problems of 
World Order, compiled and edited by Professor Saul 
H. Mendlovitz of Rutgers University Law School, and 
from World Peace Through World Law, a compre- 
hensive plan for revision of the Charter of the United 
Nations developed by Grenville Clark and Louis B. 
Sohn. Both books and other assigned readings will be 
available to study group participants at a special com- 
bined price of five dollars. Interested persons are 
urged to contact Mr. Partan at the World Rule of 
Law Center, extension 3518. The study group will be 
limited to fifteen persons. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
BACH ARIA GROUP 

The Bach Aria Group will perform on Tuesday, 
February 4th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium under 
the auspices of the Artists Series. The only perform- 
ing organization of its kind, possessing an unusual 
feature in that it places instrumental and vocal soloists 



on equal footing, the Bach Aria Group consists of 
famed singers Eileen Farrell, soprano ; Carol Smith, 
alto; Jan Peerce, tenor; and Norman Farrow, bass- 
baritone — and equally distinguished instrumentalists 
Julius Baker, flute; Robert Bloom, oboe; Bernard 
Greenhouse, cello ; Oscar Shumsky, violin ; and Paul 
Ulanowsky, piano. It is a combination without 
parallel of virtuosi who have come together to pre- 
sent the most tuneful music that Bach ever wrote. 
Performances by this unique ensemble have taken 
them through the United States, Canada, South 
America and Europe. 

Remaining tickets are priced at $2.50 and $2.00 and 
are available in Room 202-A Flowers Building or by 
calling Extension 2911. 



DELEGATE HOUSING NEEDED 
FOR U. N. MODEL ASSEMBLY 

The Middle South United Nations Model General 
Assembly, which parallels the organization and func- 
tioning of the U. N. itself, will be held on the Duke 
Campus February 12th-15th. Delegates representing 
various U. N. member nations are expected to number 
nearly 400 from at least 50 colleges and universities. 

All faculty and staff members have been contacted 
and asked to assist in housing the delegates for the 
three-day assembly. The Secretariat would like to re- 
quest University Community members who would be 
able to house one or more delegates to please return 
the card sent them by the Housing Committee or call 
extension 2909. 



RE-REGISTRATION OF AUTOMOBILES 

Vehicle registration emblems for faculty, staff, and 
employees expire February 29, 1964. Some faculty, 
staff, and employees have registered their vehicles and 
received a registration emblem with an expiration 
date of February 28, 1967. All Duke University 
faculty, staff, and employees whose current vehicle 
registration emblems bear an expiration date of Feb- 
ruary 29, 1964 must re-register the vehicle and dis- 
play the new registration emblem on the rear bumper 
of the vehicle by March 1, 1964. 

Registration places are : 

1. Hospital and Medical School personnel, includ- 
ing all faculty, staff, and employees, register at the 
office of the Personnel Director, Room 1160 Duke 
University Medical Center. 

2. All other faculty, staff, and emplovees register 
at the Traffic Office, 05 Allen Building. 



ART EXHIBITIONS 



The Department of Art and the Student Union 
Fine Arts Committee announce two new exhibits for 
the East and West Gallery areas which may be seen 
during January between the hours of 8 :00 a.m. and 
10 :00 p.m. 

A collection of early book art, a traveling exhibi- 
tion on loan from the North Carolina Museum of Art 
in Raleigh, is currently on display in the East Gallery 
of the Woman's College Library. 

The collection contains 39 book leaves, all from the 
15th and 16th centuries. Thirteen are vellum sheets 



[3] 



from hand-written and hand-illuminated manuscripts, 
■with one of these, a calendar page from a Book of 
Hours, estimated to date to 1430. 

The remaining leaves are early printed pages, em- 
bellished with woodcuts, except for two early Bible 
pages that display only hand-illuminated initials. 
Thirteen of these printed pages come from the 15th 
century, several from the 1470 's, only 30 years 
after Gutenberg's first printed Bible and only ten 
years after woodcut illustrations were introduced. 

North Carolina Museum of Art director Dr. Justus 
Bier calls the book art items "examples of a minor 
art, but great works of art nevertheless." He points 
out that the traveling exhibition "will bring to the 
galleries of the State works which can rival in quality 
the best of all times." 

A one man show of photographs by Leonard 
Kamsler, '57, formerly of Kaleigh and now a free 
lance feature photographer in New York may be seen 
in the gallery area of West Union Building. Mr. 
Kamsler has specialized in the area of photography in 
sports and commercial and educational enterprises. A 
major contributor to "Golf" and "Ski" magazines he 
has also been featured in "Sports Illustrated," "This 
Week," "Pageant," "Coronet" and numerous com- 
mercial publications. 

As an undergraduate at Duke, Mr. Kamsler was 
chief photographer for the Chanticleer, sports and 
feature editor for the Chronicle and did feature work 
for Archive and Peer. His color filming of Camp Sea- 
gull activities was his first major commercial effort 
and will be recalled particularly by those in this area. 
His work was last seen in a one man show on the 
campus in 1957. More recently he has contributed to 
the Duke Alumni Register. 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS GRANTS 

The University Committee on International Re- 
lations now has available certain funds which will be 
used for a limited number of grants. The purpose of 
these grants will be to stimulate and strengthen teach- 
ing and research in international relations at all levels 
of the University. All members of the faculty will be 
eligible for the grants, but special consideration will 
be given to younger scholars, and to those developing 
new courses or areas of study. Grants may be made 
for summer research, travel, and similar activities. 

Applications should be submitted to Professor 
William P. Tohe, Department of Economics, 306 Gray 
Building no later than February 15th. Further de- 
tails can be obtained from Professor Yohe or other 
members of the committee. 

For purposes of delimiting the scope of its activi- 
ties, the committee has adopted the working definition 
of the field of "international relations" as "those 
studies which can lead to an understanding of con- 
tacts, connections, and intercourse between sovereign 
states in the modern world." Such a definition im- 
plies that the core of international relations involves 
"the functions or exercise of governmental authority" 
but that there are "many paths to political under- 
standing." There is thus no a priori case for either 



including or excluding proposals from any particular 
academic discipline. 

The committee consists of Professors William P. 
Yohe, Chairman (Economics) ; David G. Bradley (Re- 
ligion) ; Robinson 0. Everett (Law) ; J. Harris 
Proctor (Political Science) ; William E. Scott (His- 
tory) and Patrick R. Vincent (Romance Languages). 



TIME CHANGE FOR SPRING RECESS 

President Knight has approved the following 
change in the University Calendar for the spring 
semester : 

Change the time for starting the spring vacation 
from 5 :00 p.m. to 12 :30 p.m. on Thursday, March 
26th. 



STUDENT RECITAL CANCELLED 

The student recital scheduled for Sunday, Janu- 
ary 12th in the Music Room, East Duke Building 
has been cancelled. 



WORK-STUDY PROJECTS FOR 
NICARAGUA 

The Duke University Religious Council will again 
sponsor two work-study projects in Nicaragua for 
Duke students and staff. The basic work of these 
projects is to provide Duke students with an intensive 
first-hand experience of life in a Latin American 
country and to give them a chance, in a small but 
significant way, to improve the health and education 
standards of this underdeveloped country. One of 
the projects will be located in the capital city of 
Managua, and the other in Pearl Lagoon on the 
eastern coast. 

Any interested student or staff member of the 
University may obtain further information and ap- 
plication blanks from Reverend James W. Stines at 
the Baptist Student Center; Reverend Jack W. Car- 
roll at the Methodist Student Center; or from the 
Chapel office. Please leave your name at one of the 
above places when picking up an application. Ap- 
plication deadline is January 15th. 



TRIANGLE PLAYERS 
PRESENT ONE-ACT PLAYS 

A new amateur theater group, the Triangle 
Players, will begin a series of Sunday night per- 
formances this Sunday at the Triangle Coffee House 
on Duke University Road. 

The group, composed of alumni, faculty, and stu- 
dents of the universities in the Triangle Area, will 
present new one-act plays performing each play 
twice at 9 :00 p.m. and 10 :30 p.m. on each Sunday dur- 
ing the season. There is no admission charge to any 
performance. 

The first play scheduled on the season's calendar 
is "The Last Peace," a one-act plav bv Buck Roberts, 
Duke AB '52, MA '53, of Durham. ' It will be per- 
formed this Sunday, January 12th and the following 
week on January 19th. 



[4] 



WEEK OF 



Jan. 19-25, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Jan. 19-25, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, January 19 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a,m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Stuart C. Henry, Associate Professor of Amer- 
ican Christianity in the Divinity School. Ser- 
mon: "Not of Our Own Doing." Broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 



Monday, January 20 



1:00 



4:15 



p.m. Final examination of Mrs. Elaine K. 

Crovitz for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology. 

Room 3506 Gerontology Building. 

p.m. Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Mr. Jack 

Hailman. Auditorium of Biological Sciences 

Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Tuesday, January 21 

10:00 a.m. Final examination of Mr. Cary S. Hen- 
derson for the Ph.D. degree in History. Room 
235 Allen Building. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 
Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 



5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Gerontology Council. Speaker: Pro- 
fessor Richard L, Strecker. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

7:30 p.m. The Society of Book Collectors and Book 
Lovers Meeting. Schrafft's Country Inn, Dur- 
ham-Chapel Hill Boulevard. Speaker: The 
Reverend W. W. Yardley. 



Wednesday, January 22 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
NOTE: There will be no Quadrangle Pictures during 
the week of Final Exams. 



Thursday, January 23 



4:00 



Room 208 



p.m. Academic Council Meeting. 
Flowers Building. 

p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Speaker : Dr. Julius Axelrod. Room M-20I 
Davison Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students, 
p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



4:00 



5:00 
8:15 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar for January 26-Febru- 
ary 1, should be submitted in WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Build- 
ing, West Campus, not later than 12:00 noon on Wednesday, January 22, 1964. 



Friday, January 24 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

Saturday, January 25 

Fraternity Rush. (January 25-29) 
NOTE : There will be no Quadrangle Pictures during 
the week of Fiual Exams. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER: Sunday, 1:45 P.M., Rides leave 
from circles for Murdoch School at Butner. New 
teachers for this program are urgently needed for 
more individual attention to the retarded persons 
involved. No one will be required to lead a group 
during his first session. Call the Baptist Center for 
further information (286-6097). 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER: Sunday, 9:30 A.M., Holy 
Communion. Wednesday, 7 :10 A.M. and 5 -.30 P.M., 
Holy Communion. 

The Episcopal Center is open for study during the 
exam period. All persons in the University are wel- 
come to make use of the Center. 

METHODIST CENTER: Sunday, 6:00 P.M., Eve- 
ning Prayer. Wednesday, January 29, 9 :00 A.M., 
Council Planning Retreat at the Methodist Center. 
There will be no service of Evening Prayer on Jan- 
uary 26. Services will be resumed on February 2. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Stuart C. Henry, Associate 
Professor of American Christianity in the Divinity 
School, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, January 
19th in the University Chapel. The order of worship 
follows : 
Presiding Minister: The Eeverend Dr. Howard C. "Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University 
Lector: The Eeverend A. Jack Wilson, III, Associate Director 

of Religious Life, West Campus 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Partita sopra Johann G. Walther 

"Jesu, Meine Freude" 
Choral Call to Worship — "The Lord Is in His Holy Temple" 

Calvin W. Laufer 
Hymn of Adoration — "God of Grace and God of Glory" 

John Hughes 
Prayers of Confession and for Pardon 
Words of Assurance 
The Lord's Prayer 

Anthem — "Creation" William Billings 

Scripture Lesson — Ephesians 2: 1-10 
Hymn — "The King of Love My Shepherd Is" 

John B. Dyles 
Call to Prayer 

Prayer of Thanksgiving — 

Prayers of Intercession and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 



Anthem — "Be Glad Then America" William Billings 

Eesponse — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — ' ' Not of Our Own Doing ' ' 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Besponse — "Sevenfold Amen" John Stainer 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Dialogue sur les Trompettes 

Francois Couperin 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the ser- 
mon at the University Service of Worship next Sun- 
day, January 26th is the Reverend Dr. James T. 
Cleland, Dean of the Chapel and James B. Duke Pro- 
fessor of Preaching, in the Divinity School. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mrs. Elaine K. Crovitz 
for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held on 
Monday, January 20th at 1 :00 p.m. in Room 3506 
Gerontology Building. The subject of Mrs. Crovitz 's 
dissertation is "Visual Discrimination Learning in 
Elderly Subjects." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Walter D. Obrist, 
C. Alan Boneau, Gregory A. Kimble, Martin Lakin, 
and Allen C. Kerckhoff. Professor Obrist will pre- 
side. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 



The Zoology Department will hold a seminar on 
Monday, January 20th at 4 :15 p.m. in the auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building. Mr. Jack P. 
Hailman, of the Department of Zoology, will speak 
on "The Learning of an Instinct." Coffee and tea 
will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Cary S. Henderson 
for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Tues- 
day, January 21st at 10:00 a.m. in Room 235 Allen 
Building. The subject of Mr. Henderson's disserta- 
tion is ' ' Congressman John Taber of Auburn : Politics 
and Federal Appropriations, 1923-1962." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Richard L. Watson, Jr., Donald Gillin, W. B. 
Hamilton, Harold Parker, and Harris Proctor. Pro- 
fessor Watson will preside. 



GERONTOLOGY COUNCIL 

The Gerontology Council will meet on Tuesday, 
January 21st at 5 :00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. Richard L. Strecker, Visiting Professor of 
Law, Vanderbilt University will speak on the subject 
"Aging and Tax Policy." All interested persons are 
cordially invited to attend. 



[2] 



THE SOCIETY OF BOOK COLLECTORS 
AND BOOK LOVERS 

The first meeting of the Society of Book Collectors 
and Book Lovers will be held on Tuesday, January 
21st at 7 :30 p.m. in the Pine Room of Schrafft's Coun- 
try Inn on the Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard. The 
Reverend W. W. Yardley, the Rector of Chatham 
Hall, Virginia, an authority and a collector of the 
novels of Anthony Trollope, will give a causerie on 
that exuberant and prolific Victorian writer. Mem- 
bers will discuss and decide upon a name for the 
Society and will elect a Secretary. Refreshments will 
be provided. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council will meet on Thursday, 
January 23rd at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. The business of the meeting will concern 
a discussion of certain analyses and problems related 
to them that now confront the University. The dis- 
cussion will be led by Vice-President Frank Ashmore, 
Mr. Thomas Broce, and Professors R. Lumiansky, L. 
Anderson, B. Woodhall, J. Spengler, F. Paschal, and 
T. J. Wilson. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 
will hold a seminar on Thursday, January 23rd at 
4:00 p.m. in Room M-204 Davison Building. Dr. 
Julius Axelrod of the Laboratory of Clinical Science, 
National Institute of Mental Health, will speak on 
"The Fate of Catecholamines and the Effect of 
Drugs." 



ART EXHIBITIONS 



The Department of Art and the Student Union 
Fine Arts Committee announce two new exhibits for 
the East and West Gallery areas which may be seen 
during January between the hours of 8 :00 a.m. and 
10 :00 p.m. 

A collection of early book art, a traveling exhibi- 
tion on loan from the North Carolina Museum of Art 
in Raleigh, is currently on display in the East Gallery 
of the Woman's College Library. 

The collection contains 39 book leaves, all from the 
15th and 16th centuries. Thirteen are vellum sheets 
from hand-written and hand-illuminated manuscripts, 
with one of these, a calendar page from a Book of 
Hours, estimated to date to 1430. 

The remaining leaves are early printed pages, em- 
bellished with woodcuts, except for two early Bible 
pages that display only hand-illuminated initials. 
Thirteen of these printed pages come from the 15th 
century, several from the 1470 's, only 30 years 
after Gutenberg's first printed Bible and only ten 
years after woodcut illustrations were introduced. 

North Carolina Museum of Art director Dr. Justus 
Bier calls the book art items "examples of a minor 
art, but great works of art nevertheless." He points 
out that the traveling exhibition "will bring to the 



galleries of the State works which can rival in quality 
the best of all times." 

A one man show of photographs by Leonard 
Kamsler, '57, formerly of Raleigh and now a free 
lance feature photographer in New York may be seen 
in the gallery area of West Union Building. Mr. 
Kamsler has specialized in the area of photography in 
sports and commercial and educational enterprises. A 
major contributor to "Golf" and "Ski" magazines he 
has also been featured in ' ' Sports Illustrated, " " This 
Week," "Pageant," "Coronet" and numerous com- 
mercial publications. 

As an undergraduate at Duke, Mr. Kamsler was 
chief photographer for the Chanticleer, sports and 
feature editor for the Chronicle and did feature work 
for Archive and Peer. His color filming of Camp Sea- 
gull activities was his first major commercial effort 
and will be recalled particularly by those in this area. 
His work was last seen in a one man show on the 
campus in 1957. More recently he has contributed to 
the Duke Alumni Register. 



CONFERENCE ON RELIGIOUS VOCATIONS 
AT UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The annual Conference on Religious Vocations for 
College Women will be held at Union Theological 
Seminary in New York City, February 7th, 8th, and 
9th. The Conference is planned to bring the chal- 
lenge of church vocations to outstanding college 
women who have shown an interest in religion and to 
open up varied possibilities in religious fields to them. 
This includes the field of sacred music. Anyone 
interested in being nominated as a delegate to this 
Conference should contact Miss Barbara Benedict, the 
Associate Director of Religious Activities on East 
Campus, in 110 Faculty Apartments, or call extension 
2909, within the week. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
BACH ARIA GROUP 



The Bach Aria Group will perform on Tuesday, 
February 4th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium under 
the auspices of the Artists Series. The only perform- 
ing organization of its kind, possessing an unusual 
feature in that it places instrumental and vocal soloists 
on equal footing, the Bach Aria Group consists of 
famed singers Eileen Farrell, soprano ; Carol Smith, 
alto ; Jan Peerce, tenor ; and Norman Farrow, bass- 
baritone — and equally distinguished instrumentalists 
Julius Baker, flute; Robert Bloom, oboe; Bernard 
Greenhouse, cello ; Oscar Shumsky, violin ; and Paul 
Ulanowsky, piano. It is a combination without 
parallel of virtuosi who have come together to pre- 
sent the most tuneful music that Bach ever wrote. 
Performances by this unique ensemble have taken 
them through the United States, Canada, South 
America and Europe. 

The program will consist of cantatas and arias 
nsiii"' translations and notes prepared by William H. 
Scheide, Director. Bach's main work, in quantity 
and quality, is the music, mainly cantatas, which he 
wrote for the services of the Lutheran churches of 



[3] 



Leipzig. Though never published, the numbers by 
which the church cantatas are most readily identified 
merely show their position in the complete edition of 
his works which appeared over one hundred years 
after his death. The translations have no other ob- 
ject than to set forth as baldly as possible the meaning 
of the German text. 

The program is as follows: 

I 

1. Final Chorale from Cantata 8 

2. Aria from Cantata 201 for bass, flute, oboe, violin and 
continuo 

3. Aria from Cantata 166 for tenor, oboe and continuo 

4. Aria from Cantata 249a for soprano, flute and continuo 

5. Aria from Cantata 140 for soprano, bass, oboe and continuo 

II 

1. Aria from Cantata 102 for alto, oboe and continuo 

2. Aria from Cantata 101 for tenor, flute and continuo 

3. Aria from Cantata 120 for soprano, violin and continuo 

4. Opening of Cantata 138 for the entire group 

III 

1. Aria (duet) with chorale from Cantata 101 for soprano, alto, 
flute, viola and continuo 

2. Aria from Cantata 76 for tenor and continuo 

3. Aria from Cantata 158 for bass, flute, soprano chorale and 
continuo 

4. Aria from Cantata 27 for alto, viola and piano 

IV 

1. Aria from Cantata 41 for tenor, cello and continuo 

2. Aria from Cantata. 42 for bass, violin and piano 

3. Aria from Cantata 187 for soprano, oboe and continuo 

4. Aria from Cantata 35 for alto, cello and piano 

5. Opening of Cantata 109 for the entire group 

Remaining tickets are priced at $2.50 and $2.00 
and are available in Room 202- A Flowers Building or 
write to Box KM, Duke Station, or call Extension 
2911. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 



LECTURE ON ECUMENICAL COUNCIL OF 
THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 

Dr. Robert Cushman, Dean of the Divinity School, 
will present a lecture at the Methodist Student Cen- 
ter on Sunday, February 2nd beginning at 7 :00 p.m. 
The lecture will be on the Ecumenical Council of the 
Roman Catholic Church, at which Dean Cushman was 
an observer and will be followed by a discussion. It 
will be sponsored by the Campus Christian Centers at 
Duke. The University Community is invited to at- 
tend. 



LIBRARY SCHEDULE 
Between Semester Period — 1964 



General Library 

Friday, January 24 
Saturday, January 25 
Sunday, January 26 
Monday, January 27 through 
Wednesday, January 29 
Thursday, January 30 



8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 
Closed 

8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Resume regular schedule 



8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
9:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 
Closed 



Woman's College Library 

Friday, January 24 

Saturday, January 25 

Sunday, January 26 

Monday, January 27 through 

Wednesday, January 29 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Thursday, January 30 Resume regular schedule 

Schedules for other campus libraries will be posted. 



CHAPEL PULPIT SCHEDULE— SPRING, 1964 

February 2 — ■ Dr. Thomas A. Langford 

Assistant Professor of Re- 
ligion 
9 — Communion Professor James T. Cleland 

Dean of the Chapel, Preacher 
16 — World Day of Dean Cleland 
Prayer 

23 — Dr. Hugh Anderson 
Professor of Biblical Theology 

March 1 — Dean Cleland 

8 — Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson 

Chaplain to the University 
15 — Dr. Stuart C. Henry, Associate 

Professor American Christian- 
ity 
22 — Palm Sunday Dr. George MacLeod, Founder 
and Director Iona Community, 
Scotland 
29 — Easter Sunday 
(Recess) 
April 5 — (Spring Recess) 

12 — Dr. Samuel Proctor 

President, A. & T. College 
19 — Parents Week- Dr. Robert E. Cushman 

end Dean, The Divinity School 

26 — Dr. Colin W. Williams 

National Council of Churches 
May 3 — Dr. Anderson 

10— Dr. Eric Rust 

Professor of Christian 
Philosophy 

Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 
17 — Chaplain Wilkinson 

24 — Dr. W. Arthur Kale 
Professor of Christian Educa- 
tion 

31 — Commencement 
Sermon 



CORRECTION FOR CALLING 
DUKE POISON CONTROL CENTER 

The telephone extension number listed in the 
1964 University Directory for the Duke Poison 
Control Center is not to be used. There is no one 
inside the Center to answer this phone unless a 
case is being treated. Please cross through this 
number, 3957, and write "operator 14" as the cor- 
rect number for the Poison Control Center. Indi- 
cate to the operator that your call is a poison con- 
trol call, and she will immediately connect you 
with the physician taking call for the Poison Con- 
trol Center. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 

Robert Burns King, guest organist, will present the 
next organ recital in Duke University Chapel on Sun- 
day, February 2nd at 4 :00 p.m. Mr. King, at present 
organist at the First Presbyterian Church in Burling- 
ton, has just returned from studying two years in Paris 
with Langlais and is a graduate of the School of 
Sacred Music, Union Theological Seminary, New York 
City. 



[4] 



WEEK OF 



Jan. 26-Feb. 1, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Jan. 26-Feb. 1, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, January 26 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Professor 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon : 
"The Conversion of the Elder Brother." 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 



Monday, January 27 

9:00 a.m. Final examination of Mr. Frank Thomas 
Wooten, III for the Ph.D. degree in Electrical 
Engineering. Room 132 Engineering Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, January 28 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
5:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



Wednesday, January 29 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

There will be no film showing of Quadrangle 
Pictures. 

Thursday, January 30 

8:00 a.m. Spring Semester Classes Begin. 
10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dean Robert E. Cushman. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Plrysiology and Pharma- 
cology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Robert F. 
Furchgott. Room M-204 Davison Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, January 31 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Holy Communion. Dr. Harmon L. Smith, 
Celebrant. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

Saturday, February 1 

2:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

6:15 p.m. Freshman Basketball : Duke versus V.P.I. 
Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. (Only 1 showing). Quadrangle Pictures. 
Page Auditorium. "Hamlet," starring Lau- 
rence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Eileen Herlie, and 
Basil Sidney. Academy Award Winner . . . 
"Best Picture of the Year." Olivier, "Best 
Performance By an Actor." 

8:15 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke versus Navy. 
Indoor Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. Music Department Duo Recital. Julia 
Mueller, violist and Ruth Friedberg, pianist. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
BAPTIST CENTER (REV. JAMES W. STINES, 
CHAPLAIN) : Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Supper, followed by 
Worship and a Seminar— "The Role of the Church in 
the College Community," led by the Reverends War- 
ren Carr, Julius Corpening, Dennis Hockaday and 
Ray Hodge. 

On Sunday, February 2 at 1:45 P.M., rides will 
leave from the circles for Murdoch School at Butner. 
New teachers for this program are urgently needed 
for more individual attention to the retarded persons 
involved. No one will be required to lead a group 
during his first session. Call the Baptist Center for 
further information (286-6097). 
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 
METHODIST CENTER (REV. JACK W. CAR- 
ROLL, CHAPLAIN ; REV. CRANFORD JOHNSON, 
ASSISTANT CHAPLAIN) : There will be no service 
of Evening Prayer today. Services will be resumed 
next Sunday. 

The first session of the weekly seminar discussing 
the book Honest to God, by Dr. J. A. T. Robinson, will 
be held at the Methodist Center at 9 :00 A.M., Sunday, 
February 2. A snack breakfast will precede the dis- 
cussion. All interested persons are invited to partici- 
pate. 

Wesley Players will hold tryouts for a staged 
reading of The Cocktail Party by T. S. Eliot on 
Monday, February 3, at 7 :00 P.M., at the Methodist 
Center. The reading will be presented on February 
16. All interested persons are urged to be present for 
the tryouts. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
(REV. JOHN J. CAREY, CHAPLAIN) : Sunday, 
(Jan. 26), 5:30 P.M., Congregational Christian 
Church in Durham, Informal supper meeting. Trans- 
portation will leave the Chapel steps, East Campus 
circle and Hanes House at 5 :15 P.M. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean 
of the Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, January 
26th in the University Chapel. 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University 
Lector: Dr. J. Harris Proctor, Jr., Chairman, Duke University 

Religious Council 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, February 2nd, is the Reverend Dr. Thomas 
A. Lano'ford, Assistant Professor of Religion. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Frank Thomas 
Wooten, III for the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engi- 
neering will be held on Monday, January 27th at 
9 :00 a.m. in Room 132 Engineering Building. The 
subject of Mr. Wooten 's dissertation is: "A Study of 
Stress in Ferromagnetic Thin Films." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors John L. Artley, Charles R. Vail, Thomas G. 
Wilson, and Harold W. Lewis. Professor Artley will 
preside. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY AND 
PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 
will hold a seminar in Room M-204, Davison Building 
on Thursday, January 30th at 4 :00 p.m. Dr. Robert 
F. Furchgott, Department of Pharmacology, State 
University of New York, College of Medicine will 
speak on "The Pharmacology of Catecholamines." 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
DUO RECITAL 



The Department of Music will present a program 
in its faculty series on Saturday, February 1st, when 
Julia Mueller, violist, and Ruth Friedberg, pianist, 
will give a duo recital at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, 
East. Duke Building. The University Community and 
the general public are cordially invited to attend. The 
program will be as follows: 

Sonata in G Major J. S. Bach 

Adagio 

Allegro 

Andante 

Allegro 
Sonata, Opus 9 Iain Hamilton 

Lento potente — Allegro feroce 

Adagio 

Allegro — Alia marcia funebre 

Intermission 
Lachrymae, Opus 48 Benjamin Britten 

(Reflections on a song of Dowland) 
Sonata, Opus 120, No. 2 Brahms 

Allegro amabile 

Appassionato, ma non troppo Allegro 

Andante con moto — Allegro non troppo 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Comnranity to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 



[2] 



planes) to Europe. Applications and full information 
may be secured from the Information Desk in Flowers 
Lounge as well as in the Student Activities Office, 
202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911 
(Ceroid L. Brown). 

The flight schedules are as follows : 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 
Fare: $352.20 

1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC-Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 
September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 



(2) 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 

Robert Burns King, guest organist, will present the 
next organ recital in Duke University Chapel on 
Sunday, February 2nd at 4:00 p.m. Mr. King, at 
present organist at the First Presbyterian Church in 
Burlington, has just returned from studying two 
years in Paris with Langlais and is a graduate of the 
School of Sacred Music, Union Theological Seminary, 
New York City. 

The program follows : 



Pierre da Mage 
(1676-1751) 



Suite du Premier Ton (Livre d'Orgue) 
Plein Jeu 
Fugue 

Tierce en Taille 
Grand Jeu 

Prelude and Fugue in C Major (9/8) Johann Sebastian Bach 

Scherzo (Second Symphony) 

Fantasy in A 

Pasticcio 
Song of Peace 

Carol Prelude on " Greensleeves " 

La Nativite du Seigneur 
Dieu parmi Nous 



(1685-1750) 
Louis Vierne 

(1870-1937) 
Cesar Franck 

(1822-1890) 
Jean Langlais 

(1907- ) 

Searle Wright 

(1918- ) 

Olivier Messiaen 

(1908- ) 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

LECTURE ON ECUMENICAL COUNCIL OF 

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 

Dr. Robert Cushman, Dean of the Divinity School, 
will present a lecture at the Methodist Student Cen- 
ter on Sunday, February 2nd beginning at 7 :00 p.m. 
The lecture will be on the Ecumenical Council of the 
Roman Catholic Church, at which Dean Cushman was 
an observer and will be followed by a discussion. It 
will be sponsored by the Campus Christian Centers at 
Duke. The University Community is invited to at- 
tend. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
SIGMA XI LECTURE 
Dr. David M. Gates will give a Sigma Xi lecture 
entitled "Energy Exchange in the Biosphere" in the 
auditorium of the Biological Sciences Building on 
Monday, February 3rd at 8 :00 p.m. Dr. Gates is con- 
sultant to the Director, National Bureau Standards 
Laboratories, Boulder, Colorado and lecturer in 
ecology at the University of Colorado. His lecture 



will present a physical and quantitative approach to 
ecological and physiological response of plants and 
animals in their environment. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will meet on Monday, February 
3rd in the Green Room, East Duke Building at 8 :00 
p.m. Professor Bernard Duffey of the English De- 
partment will speak on "Poems in Time: A Chapter 
in the History of American Poetry." Everyone is 
cordially invited. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
BACH ARIA GROUP 

The Bach Aria Group will perform on Tuesday, 
February 4th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium under 
the auspices of the Artists Series. The only perform- 
ing organization of its kind, possessing an unusual 
feature in that it places instrumental and vocal soloists 
on equal footing, the Bach Aria Group consists of 
famed singers Eileen Farrell, soprano ; Carol Smith, 
alto ; Jan Peerce, tenor ; and Norman Farrow, bass- 
baritone — and equally distinguished instrumentalists 
Julius Baker, flute ; Robert Bloom, oboe ; Bernard 
Greenhouse, cello ; Oscar Shumsky, violin ; and Paul 
Ulanowsky, piano. It is a combination without 
parallel of virtuosi who have come together to pre- 
sent the most tuneful music that Bach ever wrote. 
Performances by this unique ensemble have taken 
them through the United States, Canada, South 
America and Europe. 

The program will consist of cantatas and arias 
using translations and notes prepared by "William H. 
Seheide, Director. Bach's main work, in quantity 
and quality, is the music, mainly cantatas, which he 
wrote for the services of the Lutheran churches of 
Leipzig. Though never published, the numbers by 
which the church cantatas are most readily identified 
merely show their position in the complete edition of 
his works which appeared over one hundred years 
after his death. The translations have no other ob- 
ject than to set forth as baldly as possible the meaning 
of the German text. 

The usual Student Union sponsored Pre-Artists 
Series Seminar will be held in Room 208 Flowers 
Building at 7 :00 p.m. and will be under the direction 
of Mrs. Ruth Friedberg of the Department of Music. 

Remaining tickets are priced at $2.00 and are 
available in Room 202-A Flowers Building or write to 
Box KM, Duke Station, or call Extension 2911. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

STUDY GROUP ON PROBLEMS OF 

WORLD ORDER 

An informal study group on disarmament and the 
development of world order will meet at the World 
Rule of Law Center during the spring semester. The 
study group, led by Daniel G. Partan, Research Asso- 
ciate at the Center, will discuss defense policy, the 
regulation of the threat or use of force in interna- 
tional relations, the effectiveness of present peace- 
keeping machinery, and arms control and disarma- 



[3 



ment proposals. There will be twelve meetings on 
Monday evenings, 8 :00-9 :30 p.m., beginning February 
3rd, at the World Rule of Law Center, Room 201, 
Law School. The group will use mimeographed ma- 
terials and selections from Legal and Political Prob- 
lems of World Order, compiled and edited by Pro- 
fessor Saul H. Mendlovitz of Rutgers University Law 
School, and from World Peace Through World Law, 
a comprehensive plan for revision of the Charter of 
the United Nations developed by Grenville Clark and 
Louis B. Sohn. Both books and other assigned read- 
ings will be available to study group participants at 
a special combined price of five dollars. Interested 
persons are urged to contact Mr. Partan at the World 
Rule of Law Center, extension 3518. The study group 
will be limited to fifteen persons. 


Registration places are : 

1. Hospital and Medical School personnel, includ- 
ing all faculty, staff, and employees, register at the 
office of the Personnel Director, Room 1160 Duke 
University Medical Center. 

2. All other faculty, staff, and employees register 
at the Traffic Office, 05 Allen Building. 


CHAPEL CHOIR NOTICES 

The Chapel Choir will consist of all women's 
voices for the Service on Sunday, January 26th. 

The Chapel Choir will not have a rehearsal on 
Wednesday, January 29th. Instead, it has been 
scheduled for Saturday, February 1st at 2 :00 p.m. 




INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE 

Representatives from the North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Revenue will be in Room 204, Flowers Build- 
ing on Wednesday, February 12th and in the Baker 
House Reception Room on Thursday, February 13th to 
assist employees with State income tax returns. Uni- 
versity representatives will assist in the preparation 
of Federal income tax returns. Anyone desiring 
assistance with Federal or State tax returns should 
consult the representatives at this time. 

Wednesday, February 12th — Roorn 204 Flowers Building 
Thursday, February 13th — Baker House Reception Boom 
Hours: 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. both days. 


LIBRARY SCHEDULE 

Between Semester Period — 1964 

General Library 

Sunday, January 26 Closed 

Monday, January 27 through 

Wednesday, January 29 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Thursday, January 30 Resume regular schedule 

Woman's College Library 

Sunday, January 26 Closed 

Monday, January 27 through 

Wednesday, January 29 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Thursday, January 30 Resume regular schedule 
Schedules for other campus libraries will be posted. 


If you would like either a State or Federal tax 
return form prior to these dates, copies will be availa- 
ble in the Personnel Office, Allen Building. 


CORRECTION FOR CALLING 
DUKE POISON CONTROL CENTER 

The telephone extension number listed in the 
1964 University Directory for the Duke Poison 
Control Center is not to be used. There is no one 
inside the Center to answer this phone unless a 
case is being treated. Please cross through this 
number, 3957, and write "operator 14" as the cor- 
rect number for the Poison Control Center. Indi- 
cate to the operator that your call is a poison con- 
trol call, and she will immediately connect you 
with the physician taking call for the Poison Con- 
trol Center. 


DELEGATE HOUSING NEEDED 
FOR U. N. MODEL ASSEMBLY 

The Middle South United Nations Model General 
Assembly, which parallels the organization and func- 
tioning of the U. N. itself, will be held on the Duke 
Campus February 12th-15th. Delegates representing 
various U. N. member nations are expected to number 
nearly 400 from at least 50 colleges and universities. 

All faculty and staff members have been con- 
tacted and asked to assist in housing the delegates for 


the three-day assembly. The Secretariat would like 
to request University Community members who would 
be able to house one or more delegates to please 
return the card sent them by the Housing Committee 
or call extension 2909. 


ART EXHIBITIONS 

The Department of Art and the Student Union 
Fine Arts Committee announce two new exhibits for 
the East and West Gallery areas which may be seen 


RE-REGISTRATION OF AUTOMOBILES 

Vehicle registration emblems for faculty, staff, and 
employees expire February 29, 1964. Some faculty, 
staff, and employees have registered their vehicles 
and received a registration emblem with an expira- 
tion date of February 28, 1967. All Duke University 
faculty, staff, and employees whose current vehicle 
registration emblems bear an expiration date of 
February 29, 1964 must re-register the vehicle and 
display the new registration emblem on the rear 
bumper of the vehicle by March 1, 1964. 


during January between the hours of 8 :00 a.m. and 
10 :00 p.m. 

A collection of early book art, a traveling exhibi- 
tion on loan from the North Carolina Museum of Art 
in Raleigh, is currently on display in the East Gallery 
of the Woman's College Library. 

A one man show of photographs by Leonard 
Kamsler, '57, formerly of Raleigh and now a free 
lance feature photographer in New York may be seen 
in the gallery area of West Union Building. Mr. 
Kamsler has specialized in the area of photography in 
sports and commercial and educational enterprises. 



[4] 



WEEK OF 



Feb. 2-8, 1964 



CALENDAR 

OF 



WEEK OF 



Feb. 2-8, 1964 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, February 2 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Mr. John G. Simpson, Student 

Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Thomas A. Langford, Assistant Professor of 
Religion. Sermon: "Time Magazine . . . 
Morality and Mores." Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union Chess Club. 204 
Flowers Building. 

4:00 p.m. Guest Organ Recital : Robert Burns King. 
University Chapel. 

7:00 p.m. Divinity School Lecture. Methodist Stu- 
dent Center. Speaker: Dean Robert E. Cush- 
man. 



2:00 



Monday, February 3 



4:00 



p.m. Final examination of Mr. John M. Cham- 

berlin for the Ph.D. degree in History. Room 

303 Chemistry Building. 

p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 01 

Chemistry Building. Speaker: Dr. Fred G. 

Willey. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Department Seminar. Audi- 
torium of the Biological Sciences Building. 
Speaker : Professor Bernard S. Martof . 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 



7:00 p.m. Hoof 'n' Horn Meeting. Page Audi- 
torium. 

8:00 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Green Room, 
East Duke Building. Speaker: Professor 
Bernard Duffey. 

8:00 p.m. Sigma Xi Lecture. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. David M. 
Gates. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Tuesday, February 4 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. Hugh Anderson. 
12 :30-l :30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students Vol- 
leyball. Indoor Stadium. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

5:00 p.m. Gerontology Seminar. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. Speaker : Dr. Morris Rockstein. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Pre-Artists Series Semi- 
nar: Mrs. Ruth Friedberg. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 
Floor, Card Gymnasium. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



8:15 p.m. Duke University Artists Series: Bach 
Aria Group. Page Auditorium. 



10:10 

11:00 

12:30 

2:15 

4:15 

5:00. 
4:30 

5:45 
7:00 
7:00. 

7:30 



Wednesday, February 5 

a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Hugh Anderson. 

a.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 
Speaker: Professor Robert E. Cushman. 
p.m. Faculty Club Luncheon Meeting. Union 
Ballroom. Speaker : Dean M. Margaret Ball. 
p.m. Joint Duke-U.N.C. Physics Colloquium. 
Room 114 Physics Building. Speaker: Dr. 
George R. Kalbfleisch. 

p.m. Botany Department Seminar. Audi- 
torium, Biological Sciences Building. Speaker : 
Dr. Walter R. Guild. 

•6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students, 
p.m. Joint Duke-U.N.C. Psychology Sym- 
posium. Room 130 Building 9 (Old Biology 
Building.) Speaker: Dr. Michael Wallach. 

■7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
101 Asbury Building. 

p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

•9:00 p.m. Badminton-Open Douse. Woman's 
College Gymnasium. Open to all faculty, staff, 
and students. 

p.m. (Only 1 showing). Quadrangle Pictures. 
Page Auditorium. "Hamlet." starring Lau- 
rence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Eileen Herlie, and 
Basil Sidney. Academy Award Winner . . . 
"Best Pictiire of the Year." Olivier, "Best 
Performance bv an Actor." 



10:10 
2:00 



3:00- 
7:00 
4:00 

5:00 

5:00 
5:00 



7:30 
8:15 



Thursday, February 6 

a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Mr. David L. Hilton. 

p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 

Room M-204 Davison. Speaker: Dr. John W. 

Everett. 

5:00 p.m. / Duke Players Tryouts for Albee 

•9:00 p.m. ) Plays. Page Auditorium, 
p.m. University Faculty Meeting. Room 125 
Engineering Building. 

■6 :00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 
p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium, 
p.m. International Club Meeting. Room A, 
Men's Graduate Center. Speaker: Dr. Peter 
Klopfer. 

•9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building, 
p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Friday, February 7 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Hugh Anderson, Mr. S. S. Smith, and Mr. 
J. Aldridge. 

4:00 p.m. Economics Seminar. Room 130 Sociology- 
Psychology Building. Speaker : Professor F. A. 
Hanna. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

Saturday, February 8 

8:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. Magdi 
Mohamed El-Kammash for the Ph.D. degree 
in Economics. Library Conference Room. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union National Intercol- 
legiate Bridge Tournament. Green Room, East 
Duke Building. (Open to all students.) 

7:30 p.m. (Only 1 showing). Quadrangle Pictures. 
Page Auditorium. "Hamlet," starring Lau- 
rence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Eileen Herlie, and 
Basil Sidney. Academy Award Winner . . . 
"Best Picture of the Year." Olivier, "Best 
Performance by an Actor." 

8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society : Quartette Italiano. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Sunday, 1:45 P.M., Rides leave from the circles for 
Murdoch School at Butner. New teachers for this 
program are urgently needed for more individual at- 
tention to the retarded persons involved. No one will 
be required to lead a group during his first session. 
Call the Baptist Center for further information 
(286-6097). 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9 :30 A.M., Holy Communion. Monday 
(Feast of the Purification) : 7 :10 A.M. and 5 :30 P.M., 
Holy Communion. Wednesday, 7 :10 A.M and 5 :30 
P.M., Holy Communion. Friday, 4 :00 P.M., Seminar 
on "Christianity and Modern Man." 

The Episcopal Center Lectures for 1964 will focus 
on "Christian Humanism: A Plea for Humanity." 
The Lecturer will be the Reverend Samuel J. Wylie, 
Rector of the Church of the Advent, Boston, Mass. 
The lectures will be given on February 17, 19 and 20. 
Detailed announcements will be made in Campus 
publications during the next two weeks. The Uni- 
versity community is invited. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R, Patton) : Sunday, 6:00 P.M., Grace Lu- 
theran Church, 824 Buchanan Boulevard, Supper 
meeting followed by an hour of fellowship. 



[2] 



METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Cranford Johnson, Assistant Chaplain) : Sunday, 9 :00 
A.M., Seminar— Honest to God; 6:00 P.M., Evening- 
Prayer — Covenant Service. Monday, 7 :00 P.M., Try- 
outs for the Wesley Player's reading of The Cocktail 
Party. 

Dr. M. 0. Williams, Personnel Secretary of the 
Methodist Board of Missions, will be at the Method- 
ist Center on Monday, February 17, to talk with 
anyone interested in the mission program of the 
Methodist Church. Call the Methodist Center, 286- 
9230, for an appointment. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Sunday, The Westminster Fellowship will 
join the group at the Methodist Center at 7 :00 P.M., 
to hear Dean Cushman's lecture on the Ecumenical 
Council. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5:30 P.M., at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. N. W. Langston, 1619 Delaware 
Ave. After supper and a short business meeting, the 
group will go to the Methodist Center to hear Dean 
Cushman's lecture on the Ecumenical Council. Trans- 
portation will leave the Chapel steps, East Campus 
circle and Hanes House at 5 :15 P.M. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Thomas A. Langford, Assistant 
Professor of Religion, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sun- 
day, February 2nd in the University Chapel. The 
order of worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University 
Lector: Dean Mary Grace Wilson, Dean of Women, Woman's 

College 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Prelude in F minor Bach 

Chorale Prelude Bach 

' ' I Call to Thee, Lord Jesus Christ ' ' 
Choral Call to Worship—' ' The Lord Is In His Holy Temple ' ' 

Calvin W. Laufer 
Hymn of Adoration — ' ' Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise ' ' 

Welsh Melody 
Arr. by Van Demnan Thompson 
Prayers of Confession and for Pardon 
Words of Assurance 
The Lord 's Prayer 

Anthem — ' ' Sing Unto the Lord ' ' Henry Purcell 

Scripture Lesson — Romans 13:8-14 

Hymn — "I Want A Principle Within" Louis Spohr 

Call to Prayer 
Prayer of Thanksgiving 
Prayers of Intercession and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude Alessandro Scarlatti 

Anthem — ' ' Erultate Deo ' ' 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 

Sermon — ' ' Time Magazine . . . Morality and Mores ' ' 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Chornl Response — "Sevenfold Amen" Stainer 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Fugue in F minor Bach 

The sacrament of Holy Communion is to be cele- 
brated during the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, February 9th. The Celebrant is the Reverend 
Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University 



and Director of Religious Activities. The Preacher is 
the Reverend Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel and James B. Duke Professor of Preaching in 
the Divinity School. 



GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 

Robert Burns King, guest organist, will present the 
next organ recital in Duke University Chapel on 
Sunday, February 2nd at 4:00 p.m. Mr. King, at 
present organist at the First Presbyterian Church in 
Burlington, has just returned from studying two 
years in Paris with Langlais and is a graduate of the 
School of Sacred Music, Union Theological Seminary, 
New York City. 

The program follows: 



Suite du Premier Ton (Livre d'Orgue) 
Plein Jeu 
Fugue 

Tierce en Taille 
Grand Jeu 



Pierre du Mage 
(1676-1751) 



Prelude and Fugue in C Major (9/8) Johann Sebastian Bach 

(1685-1750) 

Scherzo (Second Symphony) Louis Vierne 

(1870-1937) 

Fantasy in A Cesar FrancTc 

(1822-1890) 

Pasticcio Jean Langlais 

Song of Peace (1907- ) 



Carol Prelude on ' ' Greensleeves ' ' 

La Nativite du Seigneur 
Dieu parmi Nous 



Searle Wright 

(1918- ) 

Olivier Messiaen 

(1908- ) 



LECTURE ON ECUMENICAL COUNCIL OF 
THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 

Dr. Robert Cushman, Dean of the Divinity School, 
will present a lecture at the Methodist Student Cen- 
ter on Sunday, February 2nd beginning at 7 :00 p.m. 
The lecture will be on the Ecumenical Council of the 
Roman Catholic Church, at which Dean Cushman was 
an observer and will be followed by a discussion. It 
will be SDonsored by the Campus Christian Centers at 
Duke. The University Community is invited to at- 
tend. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John M. Chamberlin 
for the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry will be held on 
Monday, February 3rd at 2:00 p.m. in Room 303 
Chemistry Building. The subject of Mr. Chamberlin 's 
dissertation is: " Potentiometric and Polarographic 
Studies in Molten Salt Solvents." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Douglas 
G. Hill, John H. Savior, Frances Brown, H. A. 
Strobel, and Henry W. Newson. Professor Hill will 
preside. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. Fred G. Willey, National Science Foundation 

Postdoctoral Fellow, Heidelberg University, 1963, will 

speak at the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Monday, 

February 3rd at 4 :00 p.m. in the Chemistry Building, 



[31 



Room 01. The subject of Dr. Willey's address will be 
' ' Photochemistry of Transoid Dienes. ' ' All interested 
persons are cordially invited to attend. 



ZOOLOGY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, February 3rd, in the Auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building at 4 :15 p.m. Pro- 
fessor Bernard S. Martof, Department of Zoology, 
North Carolina State University, will speak on "A 
Behavioral Analysis of the Mating Call of the Chorus 
Frog, Pseudacris Triseriata. " Coffee and tea will be 
served in the foyer at 4 :00. 



ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will meet on Monday, February 
3rd in the Green Room, East Duke Building at 8 :00 
p.m. Professor Bernard Duffey of the English De- 
partment will speak on ' ' Poems in Time : A Chapter 
in the History of American Poetry." Everyone is 
cordially invited. 



SIGMA XI LECTURE 



Dr. David M. Gates will give a Sigma Xi lecture 
entitled, "Energy Exchange in the Biosphere" in the 
auditorium of the Biological Sciences Building on 
Monday, February 3rd at 8 :00 p.m. Dr. Gates is con- 
sultant to the Director, National Bureau of Standards 
Laboratories, Boulder, Colorado and lecturer in 
ecology at the University of Colorado. His lecture 
will consider exchanges of energy through radiation, 
convection and latent heat transfer. Understanding 
these physical processes can give the biologist new 
tools in evaluating the physiological and ecological 
response of plants and animals in their environment. 
The University Community is cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Duke University Council on Gerontology will 
hold a seminar on Tuesday, February 4th at 5 :00 
p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. Morris Rock- 
stein, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology, University of 
Miami School of Medicine will speak on the topic. 
"Aging of Motor Ability." Interested members of 
the University Community are cordially invited to 
attend. 



BACH ARIA GROUP 

The Bach Aria Group will perform on Tuesday, 
February 4th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium under 
the auspices of the Artists Series. The only perform- 
ing organization of its kind, possessing an unusual 
feature in that it places instrumental and vocal soloists 
on equal footing, the Bach Aria Group consists of 
famed singers Eileen Farrell, soprano ; Carol Smith, 
alto ; Jan Peerce, tenor ; and Norman Farrow, bass- 
baritone — and equally distinguished instrumentalists 
Julius Baker, flute ; Robert Bloom, oboe ; Bernard 
Greenhouse, cello; Oscar Shumsky, violin; and Paul 



Ulanowsky, piano. It is a combination without 
parallel of virtuosi who have come together to pre- 
sent the most tuneful music that Bach ever wrote. 
Performances by this unique ensemble have taken 
them through the United States, Canada, South 
America and Europe. 

The program will consist of cantatas and arias 
using translations and notes prepared by William H. 
Scheide, Director. Bach's main work, in quantity 
and quality, is the music, mainly cantatas, which he 
wrote for the services of the Lutheran churches of 
Leipzig. Though never published, the numbers by 
which the church cantatas are most readily identified 
merely show their position in the complete edition of 
his works which appeared over one hundred years 
after his death. The translations have no other ob- 
ject than to set forth as baldly as possible the meaning 
of the German text. 

The usual Student Union sponsored Pre-Artists 
Series Seminar will be held in Room 208 Flowers 
Building at 7 :00 p.m. and will be under the direction 
of Mrs. Ruth Friedberg of the Department of Music. 

Remaining tickets are priced at $2.00 and are 
available in Room 202-A Flowers Building or write to 
Box KM, Duke Station, or call Extension 2911. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURE 

Professor Robert E. Cushman, Dean of the Divinity 
School and official observer to the Second Vatican 
Ecumenical Council, will deliver a lecture in York 
Chapel on Wednesday, February 5th at 11 :00 a.m. 
The title of Dean Cushman 's remarks is "Reflections 
on Vatican II. ' ' The University Community and the 
public are cordially invited. 



FACULTY CLUB LUNCHEON MEETING 
The Faculty Club will meet at a luncheon meeting 
on Wednesday, February 5th, at 12 :30 p.m. in the 
Union Ballroom. Dr. M. Margaret Ball, Dean of the 
Woman's College, will discuss the Woman's College 
and its future development. 



JOINT DUKE-U.N.C. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM 

The Joint Duke-U.N.C. Physics Colloquium will 
meet Wednesday, February 5th, at 2:15 p.m. in Room 
114 Physics Building. Dr. George R. Kalbfleisch of 
the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley, Cali- 
fornia will speak. The topic will be "Interactions of 
Pions and K-Mesons with Protons Near 1. Bev." 

Please note that the talk by Dr. R. Roberson origi- 
nally scheduled for 4 :30 p.m. has been postponed. 



BOTANY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
February 5th at 4 :15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Walter R. Guild, 
Associate Professor of Biochemistry, will speak on 
"Replication and Transcription Properties of DNA 
in Vitro and in Vivo." 

Dr. Guild earned his B.S. and M.A. degrees at 
the University of Texas and Ph.D. in biophysics at 



[4] 



Yale. Before coming to Duke in 1960 he served as a 
Radiation Safety Officer in the USAAF and on the 
faculty at Yale. His primary interests have in- 
cluded health physics, biological effects of radiation 
and bacterial transformation. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4:00 
p.m. 



JOINT DUKE-UNIVERSITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA SYMPOSIUM 
Dr. Michael Wallach of the Psj'chology Depart- 
ment will speak on "Risk-taking and Personality" on 
Wednesday, February 5th at 4:30 p.m. in the Old 
Biology Building, Room 130. The public is cordially 
invited to attend. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 
The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 
will hold a seminar, Thursday, February 6th at 2 :30 
p.m. (note time change) in Room M-204 Davison. 
Dr. John W. Everett, Department of Anatomy, will 
speak on the topic: "Evidence For A Diffuse Septal- 
hypothalamic System Controlling L. H. Release From 
the Pituitary." 



UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEETING 

The University Faculty will meet in regular session 
in Room 125, Engineering Building on Thursday, 
February 6th at 4 :00 p.m. The agenda will include 
nomination of candidates for honorary degrees. 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB MEETING 

The Duke University International Club will hold 
a dinner and discussion meeting on Thursday, Febru- 
ary 6th at 5:00 p.m. in the Men's Graduate Center 
Dining Hall, Room A. Those attending are requested 
to go through the regular cafeteria line and proceed 
to Room A. 

The subject for discussion is "University and 
Social Order," and the speaker will be Dr.' Peter 
Klopfer, Department of Zoology. All interested 
persons are welcome either before or after dinner. 
Dr. Klopfer 's talk will start at 6 :15 p.m. 



ECONOMICS SEMINAR 

The Economics Seminar will meet in Room 130 
Sociology-Psychology Building at 4:00 p.m. on Fri- 
day, February 7th. Professor F. A. Hanna of the 
Department of Economics and Business Administra- 
tion will discuss the topic: "How Many Cars are 
There?" 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Magdi Mohamed 
El-Kammash for the Ph.D. degree in Economics will 
be held on Saturday, February 8th at 8 .-00 a.m. in the 



Library Conference Room. The subject of Mr. El- 
Kammash 's dissertation is: "An Analysis of the 
Supply Approach to Economic Development of Un- 
derdeveloped Countries." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors F. A. Hanna, 
J. J. Spengler, C. B. Hoover, R. S. Smith, and T. M. 
Gallie. Professor Hanna will preside. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
QUARTETTO ITALIANO 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the fourth 
concert of its season, to be played by the Quartetto 
Italiano on Saturday, February 8th at 8 :15 p.m. in 
the Music Room, East Duke Building. The concert is 
the sixth to be presented here by the Quartetto 
Italiano, the first being in December 1951 on the oc- 
casion of the group's first visit to America. The 
musicians are Paolo Borciani and Elisa Pegreffi 
(Violins), Piero Farulli (Viola) and Franco Rossi 
(Cello). The program follows : 

Haydn . Quartet in C major, Opus 33, No. 3 ("The Bird") 

Schumann .' Quartet in A minor, Opus 41, No. 1 

Debussy Quartet in G minor, Opus 10 

Other Chamber Music Concerts scheduled this 
season include : 

March 21 (Saturday) Fine Arts Quartet 

April 11 _ (Saturday) New York String Sextet 

Admission : 

All membership cards for the current season are 
subscribed. A guest card for a single admission to 
any one concert costs $2.50 About 60 guest cards 
are available for each concert ; they may be obtained at 
the Music Room door from 7 :30 to 8 :00 p.m. on 
concert evenings. Inquiries may be addressed to 
Chamber Arts Society, c/o Ernest W. Nelson, Box 
6065, College Station. 



RE-REGISTRATION OF AUTOMOBILES 

Vehicle registration emblems for faculty, staff, and 
employees expire February 29, 1964. Some faculty, 
staff, and employees have registered their vehicles 
and received a registration emblem with an expira- 
tion date of February 28, 1967. All Duke University 
faculty, staff, and employees whose current vehicle 
registration emblems bear an expiration date of 
February 29, 1964 must re-register the vehicle and 
display the new registration emblem on the rear 
bumper of the vehicle by March 1, 1964. 

Registration places are : 

1. Hospital and Medical School personnel, includ- 
ing all faculty, staff, and employees, register at the 
office of the Personnel Director, Room 1160 Duke 
University Medical Center. 

2. All other faculty, staff, and employees register 
at the Traffic Office, 05 Allen Building. 



ADVANCE NOTICE OF THE 
POLANYI LECTURES 

The attention of the University community is 
drawn to a series of five major lectures by Professor 



[5] 



Michael Polanyi, who is in residence during the cur- 
rent semester as James B. Duke distinguished pro- 
fessor in the Department of Keligion. Professor 
Polanyi is widely regarded as one of the most dis- 
tinguished living philosophers of the western world. 
Trained in the field of medicine, he has been Pro- 
fessor of Physical Chemistry in England and subse- 
quently has held distinguished posts at Princeton, 
University of Chicago, and at Stanford's Institute of 
Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. 

Professor Polanyi 's sequence of five lectures on the 
theme, ' ' Man in Thought, ' ' begins on Monday, Febru- 
ary 10th. Lectures are scheduled on successive Mon- 
days through March 9th, in the Music Room of East 
Duke Building, at 7 :30 p.m. On the Tuesday after- 
noons following each lecture, Professor Polanyi will 
lead a discussion period from 3 :30 to 5 :00 o 'clock, in 
208 Flowers Building. 


terests in drawings, etchings, woodcuts, engravings 
and other graphic media. 

Four meetings will be held during the year (Octo- 
ber through May) open only to members and their 
guests. These meetings will include the following 
activities : 

1. "Portfolio showings" of graphics which may be pur- 
chased at a discount 

2. Discussions of art collecting and exchange of information 
and ideas related to graphics 

3. Lectures and demonstrations by artists and art historians 
Other benefits of membership : 

1. Original graphics especially commissioned in limited edi- 
tions for members 

2. Exhibitions by Artist-members and collectors 

3. Lending library of prints 

4. Free literature on the history and techniques of print- 
making, listings of reputable dealers, and other useful 
information 

5. Formal exhibitions, preceded by evening receptions, held 
at centrally located public galleries in the Durham-Raleigh- 
Chapel Hill area 


CORRECTION FOR CALLING 
DUKE POISON CONTROL CENTER 

The telephone extension number listed in the 
1964 University Directory for the Duke Poison 
Control Center is not to be used. There is no one 
inside the Center to answer this phone unless a 
case is being treated. Please cross through this 
number, 3957, and write "operator 14" as the cor- 
rect number for the Poison Control Center. Indi- 
cate to the operator that your call is a poison con- 
trol call, and she will immediately connect you 
with the physician taking call for the Poison Con- 
trol Center. 


Membership dues, $10.00 annually, will defray the 
expenses of securing and staging exhibits, providing 
literature, announcements and previews. Student 
memberships are $2.00. 

Those interested in joining the Print and Draw- 
ing Society of North Carolina may write to the Print 
and Drawing Society of North Carolina, 1216 Wood- 
burn Road, Durham, North Carolina 27705. 


SECOND SEMESTER 
DUKE ACTIVITIES CALENDAR 

The Duke University Activities Calendar is be- 
ing delivered to all members of the University Com- 
munity, either by mail or personal delivery. Please 
watch the University Weekly Calendar for addi- 
tions and deletions. For further information con- 
tact the Calendar Office, 202-A Flowers Building, 
Extension 2911. 

Cancelled : Religion Lectures, February 7th and 
8th. 


NORTH CAROLINA PRINT AND 
DRAWING SOCIETY 

Of interest to the Duke University Community is 
the organization of the Print and Drawing Society of 
North Carolina. The Society will provide opportuni- 
ties for viewing graphics and for encouraging in- 



3<2 



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WEEK OF 



Feb. 9-15, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Feb. 9-15, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, February 9 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. Simp- 
son, Student Carillonneur. 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 

Chapel, Holy Communion. The Reverend Dr. 

Howard C. Wilkinson, Celebrant. Preacher : 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, 

Dean of the Chapel. Broadcast over Radio 

Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union Chess Club. Room 

204 Flowers Building. 



Monday, February 10 



2:00-5:00 



D.m. I 
p.m. \ 



'Can 



Hoof 'n' Horn Trvouts : 

7:00-10 :00p.m. S Can." Page Auditorium. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Scieuces Building. Speaker: Dr. William 
Dantzler. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30-10:30 p.m. Department of Religion Lecture: 
Professor Michael Polanyi. Music Room, East 
Duke Building. 

p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



8:15 



Tuesday, February 11 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. James T. Cleland. 
12 :30-l :30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students Vol- 
leyball. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. ( Hoof V Horn Tryouts: "Can 

7:00-10:00 p.m. S Can." Page Auditorium. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

3 :30-5 :00 p.m. Department of Religion : Seminar on 
Polanyi Lecture. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

4:00 p.m. Student Union Graphic Art Seminar and 
Print Showing. Room 201 Flowers Building. 
Speaker: Mr. William Tomlinson, Roten Gal- 
leries. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 
Floor, Card Gymnasium. 

Wednesday, February 12 

10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon. Campus Club Coffee. Union 
Ballroom. 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. James T. Cleland. 
1 :00 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Edward 
Stadelmann. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



4:30 p.m. Experiment in International Living 
Group Session. Room 201 Flowers Building. 
Speaker : Mr. Lars Colson. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Badminton-Open House. Woman's 
College Gymnasium. Open to all faculty, staff, 
and students. 

7:00-10:00 p.m. Student Union Duke Duplicate 
Bridge Club. Green Room, East Duke Build- 
ing. (See special notice.) 

7:00-11:00 p.m. U. N. Model General Assembly 
Registration. Flowers Lounge. (For Schedule, 
see special notice.) 

7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Winter Light," with Gunnar 
Bjornstrand, Ingrid Thulin, Gunnel Lindblom. 
and Max von Sydow. Produced and directed 
by Ingmar Bergman. "This is a film to see 
and ponder." — Crowther — N. Y. Times. 

7 :30 p.m. Duke Outing Club Meeting. Auditorium 
of Building 9. 

Thursday, February 13 

9:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. James 
Hamilton Ware for the Ph.D. degree in Re- 
ligion. Library Conference Room. 
10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Mr. George H. Park. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Rich- 
ard Rhoades. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-204 Davison Building. Speaker: Dr. 
Rubin Bressler. 

4:00 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council Meeting. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. 

4:30 p.m. Joint Sociology-Psychology Colloquium. 
Room 130 Building 9. Speaker: Professor 
O. J. Harvey. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Friday, February 14 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Holy Communion. Dr. James T. Cleland, 
Celebrant. 



4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union-United Nations Model 
General Assembly Major Address : Ambassador 
Tran Van Chuong of Viet Nam. Page Audi- 
torium. 

Saturday, February 15 

6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. Davidson. 
Indoor Stadium. 

7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Winter Light," with Gunnar 
Bjornstrand, Ingrid Thulin, Gunnel Lindblom, 
and Max von Sydow. Produced and directed 
by Ingmar Bergman. "This is a film to see 
and ponder." — Crowther — N. Y. Times. 

8:15 p.m. Duke String Quartet. Music Room, East 
Duke Building. 

8:15 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke vs. Davidson. 

Indoor Stadium. 
10:00 p.m.-12:00 midnight. Student Union Candle- 
light Cabaret following game. Card Gymna- 
sium. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Friday, 6:15 P.M., Supper, followed by worship aud 
seminars: "The Role of the Church in the College 
Community," led by Reverend Julius Corpening; and 
"Mere Christianity," led by Mr. Ronald Crossley. 

Elections for the Baptist Student Union Executive 
Council will occur on March 6. Anyone wishing to 
nominate for the 1964-65 Council should submit names 
of nominees 210 later than February 28. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel, All are welcome. 
EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9 :30 A.M., Holy Communion. Tuesday, 8-11 
P.M., 1110 Arnette Avenue, Open House at the 
Chaplain's home. Ash Wednesday, 7:10 A.M. and 
5 :30 P.M., Penitential office and Holv Communion. 
Friday, 7.10 A.M., Holy Communion; 4:00 P.M., 
Seminar on Orthodoxy. 

Christian Humanism: A Plea for Humanity — The 
Episcopal Center Lectures for 1964 — February 17, 
19 and 20, at 8 :15 P.M. Detailed announcements will 
be posted on Campus bulletin boards. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R, Patton) : Sunday, 6 :30 P.M., Green Room, 
East Duke Building, program as planned. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Cranford Johnson, Assistant Chaplain) : Sunday, 
9 :00 A.M., Seminar on Honest to God, Guest leader, 
Dr. Thomas Langford; 6:00 P.M., Congregational 
Meal (discussion of the task of the Center and reports 



[2] 



on plans for the spring semester). Wednesday, 6:00 
P.M., Service of Penitence for Ash Wednesday; 7:30 
P.M., Introductory session of "Faith and Life" semi- 
nar — All interested persons are invited to participate 
in this seminar which will use readings from a variety 
of sources as the basis for discussion of the relation of 
faith and life. It will meet weekly (time to be deter- 
mined by the members) throughout the semester. 

Dr. M. 0. Williams, Personnel Secretary of the 
Methodist Board of Missions, will be at the Methodist 
Center on Monday, February 17, to talk with anyone 
interested in the mission program of the Methodist 
Church. Call the Methodist Center, 286-9230, for an 
appointment. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson): Sunday, 5:30 P.M., Supper-Vespers-Eve- 
ning Forum. Friday, 7 :30 P.M., Valentine Square 
Dance ; Everyone welcome. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5:30 P.M., at the 
home of President and Mrs. Douglas Knight on Cam- 
pus Drive. Chaplain Jim Stines will speak on "The 
Duke Projects in Nicaragua." Thursday, 12 :40 P.M., 
Luncheon at Gilbert-Addoms Dining Hall. 



THE UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

Holy Communion will be celebrated at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship on Sunday, February 9th 
at 11 :00 a.m. in the University Chapel. The Reverend 
Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University, 
will be the celebrant, and the sermon will be delivered 
by the Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean 
of the Chapel. Chancel Ministers will be The Rev- 
erend Dr. John J. Rudin, II, Associate Professor of 
Speech and Worship, The Divinity School ; The 
Reverend A. Jack Wilson, III, Associate Director of 
Religious Life ; The Reverend John J. Carey, Chap- 
lain to United Church of Christ Students; The Rev- 
erend William R. Patton, Chaplain to Lutheran Stu- 
dents. Nave Ministers will be the members of the 
Divinity School Student Body. 

The World Day of Prayer for Students will be 
observed at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, February 16. This will coincide with many 
similar services being held around the earth. The 
preacher who is scheduled to deliver the sermon is 
the Reverend Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel and James B. Duke Professor of Preaching, in 
the Divinity School. International students who ex- 
pect to participate in the leadership of the service 
include Miss Asa Uoki, of Japan, and Mr. Daniel C. 
Arichea, Jr., of the Philippines. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, February 10th, in the Audi- 
torium of the Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 
p.m. Dr. William Dantzler, Department of Zoology, 
will speak on "Renal Function in Fresh-Water 
Turtles and Desert Tortoises." Coffee and tea will 
be served in the foyer at 4:00. 



POLANYI LECTURES 

The attention of the University community is 
drawn to a series of five major lectures by Professor 
Michael Polanyi, who is in residence during the cur- 
rent semester as James B. Duke distinguished pro- 
fessor in the Department of Religion. Professor 
Polanyi is widely regarded as one of the most dis- 
tinguished living philosophers of the western world. 
Trained in the field of medicine, he has been Pro- 
fessor of Physical Chemistry in England and subse- 
quently has held distinguished posts at Princeton, 
University of Chicago, and at Stanford's Institute of 
Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. 

Professor Polanyi 's sequence of five lectures on the 
theme, ' ' Man in Thought, ' ' begins on Monday, Febru- 
ary 10th. Lectures are scheduled on successive Mon- 
days through March 9th, in the Music Room of East 
Duke Building, at 7 :30 p.m. On the Tuesday after- 
noons following each lecture, Professor Polanyi will 
lead a discussion period from 3:30 to 5:00 o'clock, in 
208 Flowers Building. 



STUDENT UNION GRAPHIC ART SEMINAR 
AND PRINT SHOWING 

The Student Union Fine Arts Committee will hold 
an open seminar on the graphic arts with Mr. William 
J. Tomlinson of the Ferdinand Roten Galleries, 
Inc., Baltimore, Maryland as guest speaker. The ses- 
sion will be held in Room 201 Flowers Building at 
4 :00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 11th. Mr. Tomlinson 
will have a large number of original prints for demon- 
stration and sale ; his visit is scheduled to coincide with 
the Roten Exhibition, "International Trends in Print- 
making," now on view in both campus exhibition 
areas. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
February 12th at 1 :00 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building, West Campus. Dr. 
Eduard Stadelmann, Private-Docent, from the Bo- 
tanical Institute of the University of Freiburg, Swit- 
zerland, will speak on "The Plasmometric Method for 
Determining Passive Permeability in Plant Cells." 

A native of Switzerland, Dr. Stadelmann has spent 
a year in the Department of Botany at Ohio State 
and is currently visiting in Minnesota at the School 
of Chemistry, Institute of Technology, University of 
Minnesota. He has published extensively on measure- 
ments of permeability of plant cells by classical plaso- 
metric methods. 



CAMPUS CLUB COFFEE 
HONORS DEAN BALL 

The Campus Club will honor Dean M. Margaret 
Ball, Dean of the Woman's College, at a coffee on 
Wednesday, February 12th from 10 :00 a.m. to 12 :00 
noon in the Union Ballroom. Serving as hostesses for 
the coffee will be members associated with the depart- 
ments of History, Political Science, and the East and 
West Food Services ; Mrs. R. L. Watson, Jr. is chair- 



m 



man. A special display of "Activities and Accom- 
plishments of Duke University Women" has been 
prepared by the program committee of which Mrs. 
Clarence Ghodes is Chairman. 



EXPERIMENT IN INTERNATIONAL LIVING 

On Wednesday, February 12th, there will be on 
campus a representative of the Experiment in Inter- 
national Living, Mr. Lars Carlson. Mr. Carlson will 
be available for individual interviews from 1 :30 p.m. 
until 4 :30 p.m. at which time a group session has been 
scheduled. All interviews and the group meeting will 
be held in Room 201 Flowers Building. 

The Experiment is a worldwide, non-profit, non- 
sectarian organization which places students as 
"family members" in foreign homes for the summer, 
thus offering an excellent opportunity for intensive 
language practice. Countries include Spain, France, 
Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Russia, and 
many others in Europe, Latin America, Africa, and 
the Near East. 

This year scholarship aid is available for students. 
A special invitation is extended to faculty and gradu- 
ate students interested in leadership opportunities as 
group leaders. 



UNITED NATIONS MODEL GENERAL 
ASSEMBLY 

Three hundred and fifty delegates representing 
forty-five colleges and universities in ten states will 
gather here Wednesday, February 12th through 
Saturday, February 15th, for the sixth annual Middle 
South Regional United Nations Model General 
Assembly. These delegates, representing more than 
seventy of the one hundred and thirteen United Na- 
tions countries, will portray the roles of LTN delegates 
in debates, discussions, caucuses and votes. This year 
a Model Security Council has also been added. 

The Assembly, which met at Duke three years ago, 
uses Main Committees, sub-committees, caucuses, a 
conference committee, special addresses, special enter- 
tainment and General Assembly plenaries to portray 
as accurately as possible the work of the UN, and to 
encourage interest in the organization. Delegates 
come well-prepared in the history, culture and politics 
of the countries which they represent. 

The planning for the Assembly, headed by Secre- 
tary-General, Craig W. Worthington, '65, has involved 
a Secretariat and committee structure of nearly one 
hundred University students and has taken more 
than eleven months. Housing for the delegates has 
been provided by members of the University Faculty 
and Staff, the religious student centers, and interested 
members of the Durham Community. The following 
sessions are open to the public: 

Wednesday, February 12th 

Registration. 7:00-11:00 p.m. Lounge in Flowers Building. 
Model Security Council. 7:00-11:00 p.m. Boom 208 Flowers 
Building. 
Thursday, February 13th 

Opening Plenary. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Woman's College Audi- 
torium. 
Meetings of Main Committees. 2:00-10:00 p.m. (To be 
announced. ) 



Friday, February 14th 

Plenary Session. 4:00-6:00 p.m. Page Auditorium. 

Major Speaker. 8:15 p.m. Page Auditorium. Eeception 
following in Flowers Lounge. 
Saturday, February 15th 

Plenary Session. 8:30-11:00 a.m. Page Auditorium. 

Plenary Session. 11:30 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 

Annual Business Session. 1 : 00 p.m. 

Adjournment 



S. U. DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB 
SPRING SCHEDULE 

The Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club an- 
nounces its spring schedule and invites all interested 
members of the University Community to join the 
group at the various meetings in the Green Room of 
East Duke Building at 7 :00 p.m. The dates are : 
Wednesday, February 12th Wednesday, March 25th 

Tuesday, February 18th Tuesday, April 7th 

Wednesday, February 26th Wednesday, April 22nd 

Wednesday, March 11th Wednesday, April 29th 

Also scheduled is the Student Union National Inter- 
collegiate Bridge Tournament (Duplicate) on Satur- 
day, February 8th in the Green Room, East Duke 
Building from 2 :00-5 :00 p.m. and a Student Union 
All-Campus Duplicate Bridge Tournament on Satur- 
day, April 18th in the Ark on East Campus from 
2 :00-5 :00 p.m. 



DUKE OUTING CLUB MEETING 

The Duke Outing Club will meet on Wednesday, 
February 12th at 7 :30 p.m. in the Auditorium of the 
Sociology-Psychology Building to plan spring trips 
and activities. Students and faculty are invited to 
attend. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James Hamilton 
Ware for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held 
on Thursday, February 13th at 9 :00 a.m. in the 
Library Conference Room. The subject of Mr. Ware's 
dissertation is "The Modern Protestant Quest for the 
Essence of Christianity Focused in the Thought of 
William Adams Brown." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors Frederick 
Herzog, Hugh Anderson, Creighton Lacy, William 
Poteat, and John Hallowell. Professor Herzog will 
preside. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
Richard Rhoades, graduate student in Botany, 
will speak to the Plant Ecology Seminar on Thursday, 
February 13th at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 of the 
Biological Sciences Building. The topic of his pres- 
entation will be the nunatak theory of M. L. Fernald 
— "The Persistence of Plants in Unglaciated Areas of 
Boreal America. ' ' All interested persons are cordially 
invited to attend. 



[4] 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 
MEETING 

The Undergraduate Faculty Council will meet 
at 4 :00 p.m. on Thursday, February 13th in Room 208 
Flowers Building'. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 
will hold a seminar on Thursday, February 13th, at 
4:00 p.m. in Room M-204 Davison Building. Dr. 
Rubin Bressler, Department of Medicine, will speak 
on "The Role of Carnitine in Fatty Acid Transport." 



JOINT SOCIOLOGY-PSYCHOLOGY 
COLLOQUIUM 

The Departments of Sociology and Psychology will 
hold a joint colloquium in Building 9, Room 130, on 
Thursday, February 13th at 4:30 p.m. Professor 
O. J. Harvey, University of Colorado, will speak on 
the topic of "Theory and Experiments in Cognitive 
Systems. ' ' 



STUDENT UNION-U.N. MODEL GENERAL 

ASSEMBLY MAJOR ADDRESS: AMBASSADOR 

TRAN VAN CHUONG 

On Friday, February 14th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium, the Student Union and the United Na- 
tions Model General Assembly will cosponsor the ap- 
pearance of Ambassador Tran Van Chuong, former 
Ambassador to the United States from Viet Nam. 
Dr. Chuong was educated in France, receiving his 
doctorate from the Faculty of Law of the University 
of Paris. Since Viet Nam gained independence, he 
has held several important governmental positions, 
including the Ministries of State and Foreign Affairs 
and Ambassador to the United States. On August 
22nd of last year, he resigned from the latter post, 
breaking with his government and his daughter, 
Madame Nhu, over the intense suppression of the 
Buddhist population in Viet Nam. The title of his 
address will be "What Next in Viet Nam?" The 
address is open to the public without charge. 



DUKE STRING QUARTET CONCERT 

The Department of Music will present a concert 
by the Duke String Quartet on Saturday, February- 
15th at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. The Quartet was organized in 1962 as a 
means of enriching the musical life of the University 
and its region and as an increase to the study op- 
portunities for the musically talented. It is receiving 
financial assistance from the Mary Duke Biddle 
Foundation. Members of the Quartet include Joseph 
Pepper, violin : Julia Mueller, viola ; Barbara Pepper 
'cello — all members of the Department of Music — and 
Seymour Miroff, violin, guest performer from New 
York City. The campus community and the general 
public are cordially invited to attend. The program 
will be as follows : 



Quartet in D Major, Opus 76, No. 5 

Allegretto 

Largo — Cantabile e mesto 

Menuetto — Allegro 

Finale — Presto 
Quartet No. 2, Opus 16 

Lebhaft und sehr energisch 

Sehr langsam 

Finale 

Intermission 
Quartet in E Minor, Opus 44, No. 2 

Allegro assai appassionato 

Scherzo 

Andante 

Presto agitato 



Haydn 



Paul Hindemith 



F. Mendelssohn 



ART EXHIBITIONS 



Now on view in the East Gallery of the Woman's 
College Library and the Gallery in the West Union 
Building is the circulating exhibition, "International 
Trends in Printmaking" on loan from the Ferdinand 
Roten Galleries, Baltimore, Maryland. The emphasis 
of this exhibition is on outstanding original prints, 
of the past fifteen years and the development and re- 
sults of post-war advances in the special techniques of 
the graphic arts. Fine craftsmanship and unusual 
processes are well represented. In this area American 
artists have been especially significant and are in- 
cluded along with works of the traditional artist- 
printer teams of Europe. Nearly all items are signed 
and numbered : the majority are in color. Some of the 
artists included in this showing are : Appel, Baskin, 
Cuevas, Erni, Sam Francis, Friedlander, Matta, 
Soulages, Hamaguchi, and Citron. 

All prints in the exhibit are purchasable and may 
be taken from the exhibition at the conclusion of the 
show on February 25th. Sales may be arranged for 
the East Campus Exhibit in the Art Department 
Office in Asbury Building, and for the West Gallery 
Exhibit in 202A Flowers Building. 



TRYOUTS FOR HOSPITAL MUSICAL PLAY 
All medical center employees, staff, and students 
are eligible to participate in the production of an 
original musical comedy to be presented in the spring 
by the School of Medicine. Tryouts will be held on 
Monday, February 17th from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. in 
the Hospital Amphitheatre and on Tuesday, February 
18th from 7 :00 to 10 :00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 



RE-REGISTRATION OF AUTOMOBILES 

Vehicle registration emblems for faculty, staff, and 
employees expire February 29, 1964. Some faculty, 
staff, and employees have registered their vehicles 
and received a registration emblem with an expira- 
tion date of February 28, 1967. All Duke University 
faculty, staff, and employees whose current vehicle 
registration emblems bear an expiration date of 
February 29, 1964 must re-register the vehicle and 
display the new registration emblem on the rear 
bumper of the vehicle by March 1, 1964. 

Registration places are : 

1. Hospital and Medical School personnel, includ- 
ing all faculty, staff, and employees, register at the 



[5] 



office of the Personnel Director, Room 1160 Duke 
University Medical Center. 

2. All other faculty, staff, and employees register 
at the Traffic Office, 05 Allen Building. 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows : 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via ELM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC — Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 



ORIGINAL PLAYS PRESENTED 

Continuing the series of original play presenta- 
tions by members of the Triangle Area universities 
will be the performance of a short play entitled 
"Beast" by Alan Goldsmith to be presented at the 
Triangle Coffee House, 1205 Duke University Road, 
at 9 :30 p.m. on Sunday, February 9th, Wednesday, 
February 12th, and Sunday, February 16th. Doc 
Fields will direct the play, and appearing in the cast 
will be: Charles Faust, Laurel Dykstra, Lise Knox, 
Bob Batson and Dick King 



ADVANCE NOTICE 



URC LECTURE 

The Faculty Program Committee of the Duke Uni- 
versity Religious Council is sponsoring an address by 
the Reverend Samuel J. Wylie on Tuesday, February 
18th, in the Old Trinity Room. Beginning vrith 
luncheon at 12 :40, the meeting will adjourn by 2 :00 
o'clock. Mr. Wylie will speak on "Christian Faith 
in Dialogue jmd Search : Signs of Renewal in Chris- 
tian Heritage." He is presently an Episcopal rector 
in Boston, but has been Chaplain previously at the 



University of Virginia, Columbia University and 
Brown University. He also has held a staff position 
in the College Division of the National Council of 
Churches. He is the author of two books, and he is 
a student of the lay movements in the European 
church. Only seventy persons may be served lunch 
in the Old Trinity Room. Reservations for the lunch, 
which will cost $1.25, will be accepted until seventy 
have been listed. Faculty and staff members desiring 
to attend should telephone 2921 or 2909 to make 
reservations. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

ANNUAL MUSIC EDUCATOR'S 

CONFERENCE 

The Department of Music announces its Third 
Annual Music Educator's Conference to be held Fri- 
day, February 21st through Saturday, February 22nd 
on the Duke Campus. The programs of this Confer- 
ence recognize the contemporary composer as a vital 
force in expanding the scope of musical comprehen- 
sions and enriching the literature of the musical art. 
The Conference shares those concepts which have 
established February as American Music Month, and 
is dedicated to the Tenth Anniversary of ' ' The Parade 
of American Music" of the National Federation of 
Music Clubs, inaugurated in 1955 by the American 
Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. 

Special events of the Conference will include lec- 
tures, concerts and clinics featuring Mr. Gunther 
Schuller, Composer and Guest Mary Duke Biddle 
Lecturer, and Mr. Iain Hamilton, Mary Duke Biddle 
Composer. Concerts will be given by The New York 
Woodwind Quartet, The New York Brass Quintet, and 
a small orchestra concert of forty-five musicians. 

The Annual Music Educator's Conferences are 
made possible by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation 
and there is no admission charge for any of the events. 
The public is cordially invited to attend. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
HILLEL BRUNCH 

The Duke Hillel Society will meet at brunch on 
Sunday, February 16th, in Room 208 Flowers Build- 
ing. Dr. John A. Freeman of the Parapsychology 
Laboratories will be the guest speaker. 



WEEK OF 

Feb. 16-22, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 

Feb. 16-22, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, February 16 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Kecital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University- 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon : 
' ' Some Reflections on Prayer. ' ' Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

12 :30 p.m. Hillel Brunch. Room 208 Flowers Build- 
ing. Speaker: Dr. John A. Freeman. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union Chess Club. Room 
204 Flowers Building. 

Monday, February 17 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium of Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker : Mr. Maximo J. 
Cerame- Vivas. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:00-10:00 p.m. Tryouts for Hospital Musical Pro- 
duction. Page Auditorium. 

7:30 p.m. Department of Religion Lecture. Speaker : 
Professor Michael Polanyi. Music Room, East 
Duke Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, February 18 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. M. O. Williams. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students Vol- 
leyball. 
12:40 p.m. University Religious Council Luncheon. 

Old Trinity Room. Speaker: The Reverend 

Samuel J. Wylie. 
3 :30-5 :00 p.m. Department of Religion Seminar on 

Polanyi Lecture. Room 208 Flowers Building. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Room 120 Physics 

Building. Speaker: Mr. E. M. Horadam. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Dnke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Tryouts for Hospital Musical Pro- 
duction. Hospital Amphitheatre. 
7:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club 

Meeting. Green Room, East Duke Building. 
7:00 p.m. Duke Sailing Club Meeting. 101 West 

Duke Building. Speaker: John Sherwood. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 

Floor, Card Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Duke International Club Panel Discussion. 

Room 111, Biological Sciences Building. 
8:00 p.m. AAUP Meeting. Law School Court Room. 

Speaker : Professor W. Van Alstyne. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



Wednesday, February 19 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. William B. Gould. 
11:00 a.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 

Speaker : Mr. Henry A. Lacy, Methodist Board 

of Missions. 
1:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Billy Kay 

Skelton for the Ph.D. degree in Economics. 

Library Conference Room. 
4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Ernest O. 

Beal. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:30 p.m. Trinity College Historical Society Din- 
ner Meeting. Men's Graduate Center. Speaker: 

Professor Tapan Kumar A. Raychaudhuri. 
5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
6:00 p.m. Methodist Board of Missions Meeting. 

Men's Graduate Center. 
7:00 p.m. Engineering Review Lecture. Room 125 

Engineering Building. Speaker: Professor 

J. N. Macduff. 
7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00-9:00 p.m. Badminton Open House. Woman's 

College Gymnasium. Open to all faculty, staff, 

and students. 
7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 

Auditorium. "Winter Light," with Gunnar 

Bjornstrand, Ingrid Thulin, Gunnel Lindblom, 

and Max von Sydow. Produced and directed 

by Ingmar Bergman. "This is a film to see 

and ponder." — Crowther — N. Y. Times. 
8:15 p.m. Music Department Lecture. Alice M. 

Baldwin Auditorium. Speaker: Mr. Gunther 

Schuller. 

Thursday, February 20 

10:00 a.m. Newcomers Club Coffee. Home of Mrs. 

Everett H. Hopkins. 2016 Campus Drive. 
10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
The Reverend William O. Bigham. 

2:30 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Depart- 
ment Seminar. Room 201 Davison Building. 
Speaker: Dr. Robert E. Forster. 

4:00 p.m. University Faculty Meeting. Room 125 
Engineering Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. Student Union Fine Arts Film Festival. 
Page Auditorium. 

7:30 p.m. The Society of Friends (Quakers) Meet- 
ing. Friends Meeting House, Alexander 
Avenue. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 



8:00 p.m. Engineering Guest Speaker Program. 
Engineering Auditorium. Speaker: Mr. M. P. 
O 'Brien. 

8:00 p.m. Economics Lecture. Room 130 Sociology 
and Psychology Building. Speaker : Professor 
William P. Yohe. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, February 21 

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Third Annual Music Educators 

Conference. 
10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dean Robert E. Cushman and The Reverend 
William O. Bigham. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

7:30 p.m. Bowling for faculty members and families 
at Sportland. Regular rates apply. 

8:15 p.m. Music Department "An Evening with 
Iain Hamilton." New York Brass Quintet and 
New York Woodwind Quintet. Alice M. Bald- 
win Auditorium. 

Saturday, February 22 

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Third Annual Music Educators 
Conference. 

9:30 a.m. Concert by New York Brass Quintet and 
Clinic Sessions. Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium. 

2:00 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke versus Univer- 
sity of Maryland. (Televised) 

2 :00 p.m. Concert by New York Woodwind Quintet. 
Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium. 

3:00 p.m. Woodwind Clinic Sessions. Alice M. 
Baldwin Auditorium. 

3:00 p.m. String Clinic by members of the Duke 
String Quartet. East Duke Building. 

5:00 p.m. Duke Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. 
Edwards Military Institute. Indoor Stadium. 

8:30 p.m. Chamber Orchestra Concert. Page Audi- 
torium. Allan Bone, Conductor. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Supper, followed by worship and 
seminars : Mr. Ronald Crossley will lead in a discus- 
sion of C. S. Lewis' Mere Christianity, and the Rev- 
erend Julius Corpening will discuss "The Role of the 
Church in the College Community." Also, Dr. Allen 
Graves of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 
will be present to talk to persons interested in religious 
education and related fields. 



[2] 



FOR ALL DENOMINATIONS: HARVARD 
DIVINITY SCHOOL REPRESENTATIVE 

Dr. John Payne will be at the Baptist 
Center on Wednesday, February 19, from 2 :00 
until 6 :00 P.M., to talk with any interested 
students about the Harvard Divinity School. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 8:00 P.M., Music Room, East Duke Building, 
Lecture — ' ' Christian Science : What It Teaches and 
What It Does. " The Lecturer, James Watt, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, is a member of the Board of Lectureship 
of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, of Boston, 
Mass., the Christian Science Mother Church. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9 :30 A.M., Holy Communion. Monday, 8 :15 
P.M., Lecture Hall, Psychology-Sociology Building, 
Lecture I in the Episcopal Center Lectures: "The 
Roots of Christian Humanism" — Lecturer, Rev. 
Samuel J. Wylie. Tuesday, 3 :30-5 P.M., Center, Open 
House for Father Wylie. Wednesday (Ember Day), 
7 :10 A.M. and 5 :30 P.M., Center, Holy Communion ; 
8:15 P.M., Lecture Hall, Psychology-Sociology Build- 
ing, Lecture II: "Christian Humanism: Its Impli- 
cations for the University.'' Thursday, 2:00-4 P.M., 
Alumni Room, East Duke Building, Coffee Hour for 
Father Wylie ; 8 :15 P.M., Episcopal Center, Lecture 
III: "Christian Humanism: Its Implications for the 
Church." Friday (Ember Day), 7:10 A.M., Center, 
Holy Communion ; 4 :00 P.M., Center, Seminar on 
" Christianity and Modern Man. " Saturday (Ember 
Day), 7:10 A.M., Center, Holy Communion. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R. Patton) : Monday, 5:15 P.M., Men's 
Graduate Center, Group will meet for supper and a 
discussion of Honest To God, by Bishop John A. T. 
Robinson. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Cranford Johnson, Assistant Chaplain) : Sunday, 9 :00 
A.M., Seminar: Honest To God; Discussion will be 
preceded by a light breakfast; 6:00 P.M., Evening 
Prayer. The preacher will be Dr. M. O. Williams, 
Personnel Secretary, Methodist Board of Missions. 
Monday, Dr. M. O. Williams will be at the Center 
to talk with anyone interested in the mission program 
of the Methodist Church. Call the Methodist Center 
(286-9230) for an appointment. Tuesday, 12 :30 P.M., 
Council Luncheon with Dr. William Gould, Methodist 
Board of Missions. 

At 5:30 P.M., Sunday, Feb. 16, the Rev. John 
Sutton of the North Carolina Conference Board of 
Education, will be at the Methodist Center to talk 
with all students interested in summer jobs as camp 
counselors at Methodist camps in North Carolina. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Sunday, 5:45 P.M., Vespers and Supper. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5:30 P.M., at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Carey, 2209 Morehead 
Ave. After supper and a brief business meeting, the 
group will go to the Methodist Center for the com- 
bined forum. Transportation will leave the Chapel 
steps, the East Campus circle and Hanes House at 



5:15. Thursday, 12:40 P.M., Luncheon in Gilbert- 
Addoms Dining Hall. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of 
the Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, February 
16th in the University Chapel. 

The order of worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University. 
Lector: Miss Asa Uoki, Secretary, Y.W.C.A., Japan 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Two Chorale Preludes 

James Young 

"Es ist genug" (First public performance) 

' ' Wie soil ieh dich empf angen 

Antiphons V from Vepres Du Commun Dupre' 

Choral Call to Worship—' ' The Lord Is In His Holy Temple ' ' 

Laufer 
Hymn of Adoration — ' ' When Morning Gilds the Skies ' ' 

Joseph Barnoy 
Prayers of Confession and for Pardon 
Words of Assurance 
The Lord 's Prayer 

Anthem — ' ' Adoramus te, Christe ' ' Mozart 

Scripture Lesson — Philippians 4:4-8, 23 

Hymn of Thanksgiving — "In Christ There Is No East Or 
West" Alexander B. Beinagle 

Call to Prayer 

Student Prayers of Intercession and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "Cantate Domino" Schiitz 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — Some Reflections on Prayer 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — ' ' Sevenfold Amen ' ' Stainer 

The Chimes 

Closing Organ Voluntary "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" 

Bach 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, February 23rd, is the Reverend Dr. Hugh 
Anderson, Professor of Biblical Theology, the Divinity 
School. 



HILLEL BRUNCH 

The Duke Hillel Society will meet at brunch at 
12 :30 p.m. on Sunday, February 16th, in Room 208 
Flowers Building. Dr. John A. Freeman of the 
Parapsychology Laboratories will be the guest speaker. 



SYMPOSIUM ON CHRISTIAN MISSION 

This week marks the annual observance of Mission 
Emphasis under the sponsorship of the Divinity 
School. Guests from the Methodist Board of Missions 
will speak in York Chapel, at the Methodist Student 
Center, at Hospital Vespers, in Divinity School Chapel 
and classes and at an open supper forum on Wednes- 
day evening. Speakers on this year's team will be 
Mr. Henry A. Lacy, Executive Secretary for South- 
ern Asia ; Dr. William B. Gould, Secretary of Student 
Work ; The Reverend O. Bigham, Missionary to Brazil ; 
and Dr. M. O. Williams, Secretary of Missionary 
Personnel. Dr. William will interview interested 
students at the Methodist Student Center on Monday, 
February 17th, and at the Divinity School, Tuesday, 
February 18th and Wednesday. February 19th. 



[3] 



EPISCOPAL CENTER LECTURES 
During the week of February 17th, the Episcopal 
University Center will inaugurate a series of lectures 
to be offered annually in the university. The Lecturer 
for 1964 will be Rev. Samuel J. Wylie, Rector of the 
Church of the Advent, Boston, Massachusetts. The 
topic for this series is ' ' Christian Humanism : A Plea 
for Humanity." (See Denominational Announce- 
ments) 

Father Wylie will be a guest at two coffee hours, to 
which all persons in the University are invited. The 
first will be on Tuesday, February 18th, from 3 :30 to 
5:00 p.m. at the Episcopal Student Center, and the 
second on Thursday, February 20th from 2 to 4 P.M. 
in the Alumni Room, East Duke Building. 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, February 17th in the Auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building at 4 :15 p.m. Mr. 
Maximo J. Cerame-Vivas, Department of Zoology, 
will speak on "The Hatteras Barrier: The Ecology of 
the Shelf Benthos." Coffee and tea will be served in 

the foyer at 4 :00. 

TRYOUTS FOR HOSPITAL MUSICAL PLAY 

All medical center employees, staff, and students 
are eligible to participate in the production of an origi- 
nal musical comedy to be presented in the spring by 
the School of Medicine. Tryouts will be held on Mon- 
day, February 17th from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. in the 
Hospital Amphitheatre and on Tuesday, February 
18th from 7 :00 to 10 :00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 

POLANYI LECTURES 

The attention of the University community is 
drawn to a series of five major lectures by Professor 
Michael Polanyi, who is in residence during the cur- 
rent semester as James B. Duke distinguished pro- 
fessor in the Department of Religion. Professor 
Polanyi is widely regarded as one of the most dis- 
tinguished living philosophers of the western world. 
Trained in the field of medicine, he has been Pro- 
fessor of Physical Chemistry in England and subse- 
quently has held distinguished posts at Princeton, 
University of Chicago, and at Stanford's Institute of 
Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. 

Professor Polanyi 's sequence of five lectures on the 
theme, "Man in Thought," begins on Monday, Febru- 
ary 10th. Lectures are scheduled on successive Mon- 
days through March 9th, in the Music Room of East 
Duke Building, at 7 :30 p.m. On the Tuesday after- 
noons following each lecture, Professor Polanyi will 
lead a discussion period from 3 :30 to 5 :00 o 'clock, in 
208 Flowers Building. 

URC LUNCHEON AND GUEST SPEAKER 
The Faculty Program Committee of the Duke 
University Religious Council cordially invites you to 
attend a luncheon at 12 :40 p.m. on Tuesday, Febru- 
ary 18th, at which The Reverend Mr. Samuel J. Wylie 
will speak on "Christian Faith in Dialogue and 
Search : Signs of Renewal in Christian Heritage. ' ' It 
will be held in the Old Trinity Room with tickets 
priced at $1.25. 



Mr. Wylie is presently an Episcopal rector in 
Boston. He has had wide experience as a chaplain at 
various colleges (Columbia, University of Virginia, 
Brown) and in the College Division of the National 
Council of Churches. He is the author of two books, 
plus other publications, and is an authority on lay 
movements within the European church. 

Since attendance will be limited to seventy (70) 
persons, those interested in attending are urged to 
call the Chapel Office (extension 2921 or extension 
2909) to make a reservation no later than Thursday, 
February 13, 1964. 

MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 
The Department of Mathematics announces two 
lectures by Professors A. F. and E. M. Horadam 
(husband and wife) of the University of New Eng- 
land, New South Wales, Australia. Mr. and Mrs. 
Horadam are both visiting professors at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina this term. Mrs. Horadam 
will speak, Tuesday, February 18th at 4 :00 p.m. on 
"Arithmetical Functions of Generalized Integers." 
Mr. Horadam will speak, Tuesday, March 3rd at 4 :00 
p.m. on "Generalized Fibonacci Numbers." Both 
lectures will be held in Room 114 in the Physics Build- 
ing, preceded by coffee in Room 120 Physics at 3 :30 
p.m. 

SAILING CLUB MEETING 

The Duke Sailing Club will meet at 7:00 p.m., 
Tuesday, February 18th in 101 West Duke Building. 
John Sherwood will give a slide lecture on ocean 
racing. All are cordially invited to attend. 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB PANEL 
DISCUSSION 
The Duke University International Club will pre- 
sent a panel discussion on Tuesday, February 18th at 
8 :00 p.m. in Room 111 Biological Sciences Building. 
The subject for discussion will be "President Kennedy 
— His Image in America and Abroad" with the pan- 
elists presenting the American, European, Middle 
Eastern and Neutralist points of view. The partici- 
pants will be : 
Dr. Richard Watson, Department of History. 
Dr. Athos Ottlenghi, School of Medicine 
Dr. Salih Wakil, Department of Biochemistry 
Mr. M. K. Nawaz, World Rule of Law Center 

A cordial welcome is extended to all those wishing 
to attend. 



AAUP MEETING 
A regular meeting of the Duke chapter of the 
American Association of University Professors will 
be held in the Law School Court Room on Tuesday, 
February 18th at 8 :00 p.m. Professor J. F. Paschal 
of the Law School, and Professor W. Van Alstyne, 
of the Ohio State University School of Law, and 
Visiting Professor in the Duke University School 
of Law will speak on the North Carolina Speaker Ban 
Law. Professor M. M. Bevington will give the report 
of the Committee on Faculty Salaries and Living 
Costs. 



[4] 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURE 

Mr. Henry A. Lacy, Executive Secretary for 
Southern Asia, Methodist Board of Missions, will 
lecture on ' ' Changing Patterns : The Church in South- 
ern Asia" in York Chapel, Divinity School, on 
Wednesday, February 19th at 11 :00 a.m. The public 
is cordially invited. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Billy Ray Skelton for 
the Ph.D. degree in Economics will be held on Wednes- 
day, February 19th at 1:30 p.m. in the Library 
Conference Room. The subject of Mr. Skelton 's dis- 
sertation is "Industrialization and Unionization in 
North Carolina and South Carolina. An Economic 
Comparison." The committee to conduct the exami- 
nation consists of Professors Frank T. de Vyver, 
C. B. Hoover, J. J. Spengler, Louis DeAlessi, and 
W. P. Yohe. Professor de Vyver will preside. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
February 19th at 4 :15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building, West Campus. Dr. 
Ernest 0. Beal, Professor of Botany and Bacteriology, 
at North Carolina State will speak on "The Occur- 
rence and Maintenance of Polymorphism in Aquatic 
Plants." 

Dr. Beal received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at 
the University of Iowa. Most of his research has been 
directed toward taxonomic and bio-systematic prob- 
lems of aquatic plants. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4:00 
p.m. 



TRINITY COLLEGE HISTORICAL 
SOCIETY MEETING 

The Trinity College Historical Society will hold 
its first dinner meeting for the spring semester on 
Wednesday, February 19th in the private dining 
room of the Men's Graduate Center, beginning at 
5 :30 p.m. The speaker will be Professor Tapan 
Kumar Raychaudhuri of the Delhi School of Eco- 
nomics, who is a visiting professor this semester in 
the Department of History. 

Professor Raychaudhuri is a specialist in Indian 
economic history and holds D. Phil, degrees from both 
the University of Calcutta and Oxford University ; he 
is currently managing editor of the Indian Economic 
and Social History Review. His subject will be "In- 
dian Economic Backwardness in Historical Perspec- 
tive." 



METHODIST BOARD OF MISSIONS 
MEETING 

An open discussion meeting on "Changing Pat- 
terns in the World Church," with all members of 
the Methodist Board of Missions team, will be held at 
the Men's Graduate Center on Wednesday, February 
19th at 6:00 p.m. The University Community is in- 
vited. 



ENGINEERING REVIEW LECTURES 

The Duke University Chapter of Pi Tau Sigma, 
mechanical engineering national honor society, is 
sponsoring a series of review lectures on engineering 
fundamentals for those persons preparing for the 
Engineer-in-Training examination to be given in May 
by the State of North Carolina. 

The EIT Examination is the first of two parts of 
written examination in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for the registration and licensing of engi- 
neers in North Carolina. Credit for the EIT certifi- 
cate usually is valid for a period of 10 years and is 
allowed reciprocity by most states. 

Review lectures are scheduled on successive 
Wednesday nights at 7 :00 p.m. in the auditorium of 
the College of Engineering Building. All sessions are 
open to the public. The dates and topics to be in- 
cluded are as follows: 

MATHEMATICS: Wednesday, February 19th, 7:00 p.m., 
Koom 125 Engineering Building. Professor J. N. Macduff. 

CHEMISTRY: Wednesday, February 26th, 7:00 p.m., Room 
125 Engineering Building. Dr. James Bonk. 

ELECTRICITY (Circuits): Wednesday, March 4th, 7:00 
p.m., Room 139 Engineering Building. Mr. J. M. Hunt. 

STATICS-STRENGTH: Wednesday, March 11, 7:00 p.m., 
Room 139 Engineering Building. Mr. F. C. Sheppard. 

KINEMATICS-KINETICS: Wednesday, April 15th, 7:00 
p.m., Room 139 Engineering Building. Professor V. L. Kenyon. 

FLUIDS: Wednesday, April 29th, 7:00 p.m., Room 139 
Engineering Building. Dr. A. S. Wood. 

GUNTHER SCHULLER, 

MARY DUKE BIDDLE 

FOUNDATION LECTURER 

The Department of Music will present Gunther 
Schuller, distinguished young composer from New 
York City as its Mary Duke Biddle Foundation Lec- 
turer for 1963-64 on Wednesday, February 19th at 
8 :15 p.m. in the Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium, East 
Campus. Mr. Schuller 's topic will be ' ' Third Stream 
Music: A Vital Development in Jazz." His talk will 
be illustrated by tape recordings of appropriate musi- 
cal examples performed by eminent jazz performers. 
A reception honoring Mr. Schuller will be given fol- 
lowing the lecture in the Parlors of East Duke 
Building. The University Community and the general 
public are cordially invited to attend. 

Mr. Schuller will also be an active participant in 
the Third Annual Music Educators' Conference pre- 
sented by the Department of Music under the auspices 
of the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation on February 
21st and 22nd. On Friday, February 21st, on the 
"An Evening With Iain Hamilton," he will conduct 
the New York Woodwind Quintet and the New York 
Brass Quintet in a performance of his "Double 
Quintet." On Saturday, February 22nd, he will be 
guest speaker at a luncheon honoring music teacher 
participants in the Conference. His topic will be 
"Composer and Listener: A Shared Responsibility." 

He will participate with Iain Hamilton, Mary Duke 
Biddle Professor of Music, in a television discussion 
produced by WUNC-TV (Channel 4) which will be 
shown on Sunday, February 23rd, at 9 :00 p.m. 

NEWCOMERS CLUB MEETING 

The Newcomers' Club will hold a morning coffee 
on Thursday, February 20th at 10:00 a.m. at the 



[5] 



home of Mrs. Everett H. Hopkins, 2016 Campus 
Drive. The program will be a participation in the 
Club's project of sewing for underprivileged children. 
All members of the Club are invited to bring a ' ' sack ' ' 
lunch and continue sewing during the afternoon. 

PHYSIOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology & Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, February 20th at 2:30 p.m. in Room 
204 Davison Building. Dr. Robert E. Forster, Pro- 
fessor of Physiology, Postgraduate School of Medi- 
cine, University of Pennsylvania, will speak on "Dif- 
fusion of Oxygen into Red Blood Cells. ' ' 

REGULAR MEETING OF THE 
UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

The University Faculty will meet in regular ses- 
sion in Room 125 Engineering Building on Thursday, 
February 20th at 4 :00 p.m. The agenda will include 
approval of nominations of candidates for honorary 
degrees. 



STUDENT UNION PRESENTS 
FINE ARTS FILM FESTIVAL 

The annual Student Union Fine Arts Film Festi- 
val will be presented on Thursday, February 20th at 
7 :30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Entitled ' ' Yesterday — 
Today and Tomorrow," the program will attempt to 
show the arts of the past, present and future, includ- 
ing films on sculpture, painting, the dance and experi- 
mental abstract photography. Open to the public 
without charge, the Student Union Fine Arts Com- 
mittee extends a cordial invitation to the University 
Community to attend this unusual showing of art 
films. The program follows : 

Yesterday 

"Greek Gods in Art" 

"Jan Van Eyck" 

' ' Chinese Painting Through the Ages ' ' 
Today 

' ' A Dancer 's World ' ' with Martha Graham 

"Alexander Calder: From the Circus to the Moon" 
Tomorrow 

"Dom" 

"Dance in the Sun" with Daniel Nagren 

"Ai-Ye" 

' ' Dream of the Wild Horses ' ' 



FRIENDS MEETING 

The Society of Friends (Quakers) will hold their 
monthly business meeting at. 7 :30 p.m. on Thursday, 
February 20th, preceded by "potluck supper" at 
6 :00 p.m., at Friends Meeting House, on Alexander 
Street. For further information call Mrs. Martha 
Klopfer, 286-4868. All are welcome. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
GUEST SPEAKER PROGRAM 

The College of Engineering Guest Speaker Pro- 
gram will present Dean M. P. O'Brien, Thursday, 
February 20th at 8 :00 p.m. in the Auditorium of the 
Engineering Building. Dean O'Brien, General Elec- 
tric Company; and Dean Emeritus of Engineering, 
University of California, Berkeley, California, will 
speak on "The Dynamics of Engineering Practice." 



ECONOMICS LECTURE 
Professor William P. Yohe will give the second in 
a series of public lectures on current economic issues 
on Thursday, February 20th at 8 :00 p.m. in Room 
130 Sociology and Psychology Building. His subject 
will be "The Tax Cut." The university community 
and the public are cordially invited. 



THIRD ANNUAL 
MUSIC EDUCATORS' CONFERENCE 

The Department of Music will present its Third 
Annual Music Educators' Conference on February 
21st and 22nd. Given under the auspices of the Mary 
Duke Biddle Foundation all of its events are pre- 
sented without charge and the University Community 
and the general public are cordially invited to attend. 
This year the Conference will be primarily focussed 
on contemporary music in various lecture and concert 
presentations by guest Mary Duke Biddle Foundation 
lecturer Gunther Schuller, eminent New York com- 
poser, and the internationally renowned quintets : the 
New York Woodwind Quintet and the New York Brass 
Quintet. The programs of the Conference recognize 
the contemporary composer as a vital force in expand- 
ing the scope of our comprehensions and enriching 
the literature of the musical art. 

On Friday evening, February 21st the two quin- 
tets will appear in conjunction with Iain Hamilton, 
in "An Evening With Iain Hamilton" featuring 
first performances of Hamilton's "Sonatas and Vari- 
ants for Ten Winds" and "Quintet for Brass Instru- 
ments" by Alvin Etler, Professor of Composition at 
Smith College. The concert will be held at 8 :15 p.m. 
in the Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium. Participants 
will be : 

Iain Hamilton, Mary Duke Biddle Professor of Music 
Gunther Schuller, Guest Mary Duke Biddle Lecturer 
The New York Woodwind Quintet: 

Samuel Baron, flute 

Ronald Roseman, oboe 

David Glazer, clarinet 

Ralph Froelich, French horn 

Arthur Weisberg, bassoon 
The New York Brass Quintet: 

Robert Nagel, Ted Weis, trumpets 

Paul Ingraham, French horn 

John Swallow, trombone 

Harvey Phillips, tuba 

Program 
Eight Etudes and a Fantasy (1950) Elliott Carter 

Sonatas and Variants for Ten Winds Iain Hamilton 

(First Performance) 

Intermission 
Double Quintet Gunther Schuller 

Quintet for Brass Instruments Alvin Etler 

(First Performance) 

On Saturday morning, February 22nd the mem- 
bers of the New York Brass Quintet will present a 
forty-five minute concert at 9 :30 a.m. in Alice M. 
Baldwin Auditorium, East Campus to be followed by 
clinic sessions on the separate instruments for high 
school and college music teachers and their students. 
Similar presentations beginning with a 2 :00 p.m. con- 
cert will be given by the New York Woodwind Quin- 
tet. String clinics by members of the Duke String 
Quartet will be presented at 3 :00 p.m. in East Duke 
Building, Woman's College. 



[6] 



On Saturday evening, February 22nd at 8 :30 p.m. 
in Page Auditorium the New York Woodwind Quintet, 
augmented by selected players from the Duke Sym- 
phony Orchestra, will participate in a forty-five piece 
chamber orchestra concert conducted by Allan Bone. 

Program 

Allan Bone, Conductor 

Soloists : 

Ronald Fishbaugh, Pianist 

Members of the New York Woodwind Quintet 

and the New York Brass Quintet 

Gabrieli 

Antiphonal Choir: The New York Brass Quintet 
Samuel Barter 
Mozart 

Intermission 
Walter Piston 
Igor Stravinsky 

Sonata Pian e Forte from "Symphoniae 
Sacrae ' ' 

Capricorn Concerto (1944) for Flute, Oboe, 
Trumpet and Strings 

Samuel Baron, Flute 
Ronald Roseman, Oboe 
Robert Nagel, Trumpet 
Sinfonia Concertante for Oboe, Clarinet, 
French Horn and Bassoon 
Ronald Roseman, Oboe 
David Glazer, Clarinet 
Ralph Froelich, French Horn 
Arthur Weisberg, Bassoon 
Concertino for Piano and Chamber Orchestra 
(1937) 

Mr. Fishbaugh 
Suite No. I for Small Orchestra (1917-1925) 
Suite No. II for Small Orchestra (1921) 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

ARTISTS SERIES: PRESTI AND LAGOYA, 

GUITAR DUO 

The Duke University Artists Series will present 
Presti and Lagoya, duo-guitarists, Tuesday, March 
10th at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Ida Presti 
and Alexandre Lagoya had both established them- 
selves as solo concert artists of considerable distinc- 
tion when ,in 1955 they joined forces to form a 
guitar-duo. In the years since, Presti-Lagoya have 
won critical praise and fervent audience acclaim in 
Europe, North Africa, India and Australia. In their 
unique and fascinating: programs Presti and Lagoya 
combine original works for guitar-duo with superb 
transcriptions ranging from Bach and Scarlatti to 
Albeniz and Debussy. Tickets priced at $2.50 and 
$2.00 are available in 202A Flowers Building, or call 
extension 2911 for reservations. 



TRIANGLE COFFEE HOUSE PRODUCTION 

"Beast," a short play by Alan Goldsmith, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, '64, will be presented again 
Sunday, February 16th at 9 :30 p.m. at the Triangle 
Coffee House at 1205 Duke University Road. Buck 
Roberts, a Duke alumnus, is coordinator for the pro- 
duction ; Bob Tripp, a graduate student in psychology 
at Duke, is technical director, and Alan Ross, of the 
'61 Duke Class, is manager of the Coffee House. The 
cast includes : Laurel Dykstra. a Carolina Playmaker ; 
Lise Knox of Durham ; Charles Faust of the Raleigh 
Little Theatre : Dick King, a former Carolina Play- 
maker, and Alan Goldsmith of the University of North 
Carolina. 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows: 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC — Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 

UNDERGRADUATE 
BOOK COLLECTORS CONTEST 

The prize contest for Undergraduate Book Collec- 
tors is sponsored jointly by The Friends of Duke 
University Library and the Gothic Bookshop, and is 
open to all Undergraduates. Three prizes — of respec- 
tively $100, $60 and $40 worth of books, winner's 
choice — will be awarded this year. The closing date 
is April 8th. For full details see Jeremy North at the 
Gothic Bookshop. 

ART LOAN COLLECTION 

The Department of Art announces that the Art 
Loan Collection is available for rental in Room 103 
Asbury Building, Monday through Friday between 
9 :00 a.m. and 5 :00 p.m. The collection contains re- 
productions of contemporary art and also some origi- 
nals. The pictures are rented per semester. Rental 
fee is $3.00 to be paid in advance. A few Student 
Loan Reproductions are also available, free of charge. 

THE HARLEY AFRICAN COLLECTION 

The George W. Harley African Collection is now 
on display on the second floor of the Psychology- 
Sociology Building (Old Biology) outside the Depart- 
ment of Sociology and Anthropology. Dr. Harley is 
a distinguished alumnus, formerly assistant curator 
of the Biology Museum at old Trinity College, and 
later curator of the Pathology Museum at the Yale 
Medical School. Much of his collection of African 
masks is in the Peabody Museum at Harvard, where 
he did post-graduate work. After a number of years 
of medical work in "West Africa, Dr. Harley began 
for President Tubman the government museum of 
ethnology and history in Liberia. The exhibit will be 
on display during the spring semester. 



STUDENT UNION 
CHILD CARE SERVICE 

The Student Union's Special Service Committee 
wishes to remind the faculty, staff, and married stu- 
dents of the child care service provided by Woman's 
College students. Procedure for securing a "baby- 
sitter" is as follows : 
1. Please call the dormitory which corresponds with 



[7] 



the first letter of your last name unless special con- 
tact has been made with a particular individual. 

2. The dormitory representative (names listed below) 
will contact a "sitter" who will return the call to 
confirm the request. 

3. Transportation must be supplied. 

4. Standard rate is 500 per hour. 

5. "Sitter" must be returned 15 minutes prior to 
house closing. (Friday and Sunday, 12:00 mid- 
night; Saturday, 1:00 a.m.; week nights, 12:00 
midnight for Juniors and Seniors and 10 :30 p.m. 
for Freshmen and Sophomores. 

6. Remember : An early request gets better results ! 
DORMITORY REPRESENTATIVES: 

A-B 1. Addoms (ext. 3823) — Louise Dowling 
C-E 2. Alspaugh (est. 3414) — Thais Ahrendt 
F-G 3. Aycock (ext. 3221) — Carolyn Cutchin 
H-J 4. Basset (ext. 3321) — Linda Gregory 
K-L 5. Brown (ext. 3521) — Pat Hughes 
M-N 6. Gilbert (ext. 3823)— Janet Evans 
O-Q 7. Giles (ext. 2231) — Mardi Jacobson 
R-S 8. Jarvis (ext. 3931) — Elaine Bloomer 
T-V 9. Pegram (ext. 2031) — Christy Nelson 
W-Z10. Southgate (ext. 3721) — Linda Israel 

DUKE MUSICIANS ON 
WUNC-TV PROGRAMS 

Duke String Quartet 
8:00 p.m. Wednesday, February 19th — Channel 4 "Performance 

Series ' ' 
5:00 p.m. Sunday, February 23rd— Channel 4 "Performance 
Series" 
Composers Iain Hamilton and Gunther 
Schuller in Conversation 
9:00 p.m. Sunday, February 23rd — Channel 4 

Iain Hamilton and Duke String Quartet 
9:30 p.m. Wednesday, February 26th — Channel 4 



LAW SCHOOL CONFERENCE 
ON "SOVIET IMPACT ON 
INTERNATIONAL LAW" 
A national conference entitled "Soviet Impact on 
International Law" will be held at the Duke Law 
School, Friday, February 28th through Saturday, 
February 29th. The conference is sponsored by The 
American Society of International Law and The Asso- 
ciation of Student International Law Societies, and 
is open to the public. All the presentations will be 
made in the Law School Courtroom. Official program 
and applications may be obtained by writing to Con- 
ference, Box 4627, Duke Station, Durham, North 
Carolina. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
POETRY LECTURE 

Professor Denis Donoghue of the University of 
Dublin, Ireland, will be the guest of the Department 
of English on Tuesday, February 25th. That evening 
at 8:15 p.m. he will lecture on "Three Directions in 
Modern American Poetry" in the Green Room, East 
Duke Building. Mr. Donoghue, currently Visiting 
Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, is the 
author of several dozen essays on modern British and 
American literature and of a volume on modern 
poetic drama, The Third Voice. Two other volumes 
of his literary criticism are forthcoming. 

The public is cordially invited to attend the lecture. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ECONOMICS LECTURE 

Professor Joseph J. Spengler will give the third 
in a series of public lectures on current economic 
issues on Tuesday evening, March 3rd at 8 :00 p.m. in 
Room 130, Sociology and Psychology Building. His 
subject will be "The Population Explosion." The 
University Community and the Public are cordially 
invited. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
PHI BETA KAPPA MEETING 

The annual spring business meeting of the Duke 
Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa will be held on Wednes- 
day, February 26th, at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 205 Divin- 
ity School. Undergraduate, alumnus, and honorary 
elections will be considered. Plans for the spring 
dinner and initiation will be presented. All members 
presently on the campus are urged to be present. In- 
quiries should be directed to the Secretary, Professor 
W. F. Stinespring, 105 Divinity School. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ART DEPARTMENT LECTURE 

Dr. W. S. Heckscher, Professor of Art History and 
Director of the Iconological Institute of the University 
of Utrecht, will give an illustrated lecture on "The 
Significance of Van E yck's Portraits" in Room 204 
East Duke Building on Friday, February 28th at 4 :00 
p.m. Dr. Heckscher is currently a visiting professor 
at the University of Pittsburgh, has been a member 
of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, at 
frequent intervals, and was a Fellow of the Folger 
Shakespeare Library, Washington, D. C, in 1960 and 
1963. The lecture is sponsored by the Department of 
Art with support from the Mary Duke Biddle Founda- 
tion. 



AIRCADE 

On Monday, March 2nd, Duke University and the 
Durham Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a pro- 
gram presented by the National Chamber of Commerce 
to stimulate citizenship participation in government. 

The program will begin at 9 :25 a.m. at Page Audi- 
torium. Panelists will include Arch Booth and Ed- 
ward B. Neilan of the National Chamber of Commerce 
and noted business and industrial leaders. This will 
be an audience participation program, with questions 
being submitted from the floor. Issues such as tax- 
ation, medicare, spending policies, etc., will be dis- 
cussed. 

A catered luncheon will be served in the Indoor 
Stadium. This will be followed by the conclusion of 
the program in Page Auditorium. Adjournment will 
be at 3 :30 p.m. 

The cost of $7.00, including the luncheon. All inter- 
ested faculty, staff, and students are requested to call 
or write the local Chamber of Commerce for tickets. 
Business men will be flying to Duke from a seven- 
state area. Participation must be limited to 1,200 
people, with ticket requests being filled as they are 
received. Interested members of the University Com- 
munity are urged to submit their ticket requests with- 
out delay. 



WEEK OF 

Feb. 23-29, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 

Feb. 23-29, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, February 23 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Kecital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Hugh 
Anderson, Professor of Biblical Criticism and 
Theology, The Divinity School. Sermon : ' ' Faith 
and Its Fruit." Broadcast over Radio Station 
WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union Chess Club. Room 

204 Flowers Building. 
7:15 p.m. Lenten Services, Episcopal Student Center. 

Monday, February 24 

5 :00 p.m. Memorial Services for David D. Holt, '61. 
University Chapel. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. Religion Department Lecture: Professor 
Michael Polanyi. Music Room, East Duke 
Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Tuesday, February 25 

10:10 a.m. Divinitv School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. -James M. Efird. 



12 :30-l :30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students Vol- 
leyball. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Religion Department Seminar on 

Professor Polanyi 's Lecture. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. Wake 

Forest. Indoor Stadium. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 

Floor, Card Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke vs. Wake 

Forest. Indoor Stadium. 
8:15 p.m. English Department Lecture. Green 

Room, East Duke Building. Speaker : Professor 

Denis Donoghue. 

Wednesday, February 26 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. James M. Efird. 
11:00 a.m. Faculty Lecture. York Chapel. Speaker: 

Dr. William F. Stinespring. 
4:00 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Meeting. Room 205 

Divinity School. 
4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Ralph 
Morrison. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Badminton Open House. "Woman's 
College Gymnasium. Open to all faculty, staff, 
and students. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. Mondo Cane "Intelligent and 
repellent . . . cultured and coarse . . . brilliant 
sequences" — Herald Tribune. "Gigantic mo- 
tion picture" — Crowther, New York Times. 
The makers of this film have documented with 
devastating candor some of the flourishing cults 
of our world, and by an artful juxtaposing of 
the primitive and the civilized, the remote and 
the familiar, have managed to reveal iu them a 
common source of irrationality that is chilling 
but fascinating to behold. 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club. 
Green Room, East Duke Building. 

Thursday, February 27 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. J. B. Hanson. 

2:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-201 Davison Building. Speaker: Dr. 
Karl-Kleinz Gertz. 

4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. Speaker: Professor Wil- 
liam L. Culberson. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:45 p.m. International Club Dinner and Meeting. 
Dining Hall, Men 's Graduate Center. Speaker : 
Dr. Kurt Back. 

7:30 p.m. English Department: Poetry Reading. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Speaker: Mr. 
Charles Edward Eton. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, February 28 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Mr. S. Stephen Smith. 
11:00 a.m. Registration for National Law Confer- 
ence: "Soviet Impact on International Law." 
Law School. (See special notice) 
2:30-3:30 p.m. Tenth Conference on Teaching the 
Social Studies, General Session. Woman's Col- 
lege Auditorium. Speaker: Dr. Joseph J. 
Spengler. 
4:00-5:00 p.m. Social Studies Conference. General 
Session. Woman 's College Auditorium. Speak- 
er: Dr. Ralph Braibanti. 
4:00 p.m. Art Department Lecture. Room 204 East 
Duke Building. Speaker : Dr. W. S. Heckscher. 



4:15-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

6:30 p.m. Chi Epsilon Banquet. Old Trinity Room. 
Speaker : Dr. W. Brewster Snow. 

6:00-8:00 p.m. Social Studies Conference. Banquet. 
Union Ballroom. Speaker: Dr. Paul H. Clyde. 

8:15 p.m. Men's and Women's Glee Clubs Joint 
Concert. Page Auditorium. 

Saturday, February 29 

9:00-10:15 a.m. Conference on Teaching the Social 
Studies General Session. Woman's College 
Auditorium. Speaker: Dr. William L. Rowe. 
10:45-12:00 noon. Conference on Social Studies. 
Woman's College Auditorium. Speaker: Dr. 
George T. Yu. 
12:30-2:00 p.m. Conference on Social Studies. Lunch- 
eon. Union Ballroom. Speaker : Dr. Robert A. 
Rupen. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. Mondo Cane. "Intelligent and 
repellent . . . cultured and coarse . . . brilliant 
sequences — Herald Tribune. "Gigantic mo- 
tion picture" — Crowther, New York Times. 
The makers of this film have documented with 
devastating candor some of the flourishing cults 
of our world, and by an artful juxtaposing of 
the primitive and the civilized, the remote and 
the familiar, have managed to reveal in them a 
common source of irrationality that is chilling 
but fascinating to behold. 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club. 
Green Room, East Duke Building 1 . 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Supper, followed by Worship and 
Seminars : The Rev. Charles Wellborn will begin a 
series on Bishop Robinson 's Honest to God. Chaplain 
Stines will lead a discussion on "Some Implications of 
the Christian Faith for A Philosophy of Language." 

Nominations for the 1964-65 B.S.U. Executive 
Council should be made at the Center office bv Febru- 
ary 28. 

Sunday, March 1, Rides to the Murdoch School at 
Butner will leave from East and West circles at 1 :45 
P.M. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9:30 A.M., Holy Communion; 7:15 P.M., 
Forum. Monday, (St. Matthias)', 7 :10 A.M. and 5 :30 
P.M., Holy Communion. Friday, 7:10 A.M., Holy 
Communion; 4:00 P.M., Seminar on Orthodoxy. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R. Patton) : Sunday, 7:15 P.M., Episcopal 
Center, Forum. Monday, 5 :30 P.M., Men's Graduate 
Center, Supper meeting and Discussion of the book. 
Honest to God by J. A. T. Robinson. 



2] 



METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, 9:00 
A.M., Seminars : Honest to God Seminar (snack break- 
fast followed by discussion) : Faith and Life Seminar 
— organizational meeting — All interested in engaging 
in conversation on the relation of faith and life 
through readings, discussion and films, are invited to 
be present. A snack breakfast will precede the 
seminar. 6 :00 P.M., Evening Prayer Service. Thurs- 
day, 5:30 P.M., Men's Graduate Center, Social Legis- 
lation Seminar — After an introductory session on the 
governmental concern with social problems, specific 
issues — e.g. urban affairs, automation, civil rights, 
pressure groups and public opinion — will be the con- 
tent of the following bi-weekly seminars. Go through 
the cafeteria line and bring your tray to the small din- 
ing room. 

Tryouts for the Wesley Players' spring production, 
Bus Stop by William Inge, will be held February 25 
and 26 at 7 :30 P.M. at the Methodist Center. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5:30 P.M., Home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Robert Bonar, 3306 Chapel Hill 
Road. After supper and a short business meeting the 
group will join the other campus groups for the 
Lenten Lecture Series at the Episcopal Center. Trans- 
portation will leave the East Campus circle, the 
Chapel steps and Hanes House at 5 :15 P.M. Thursday, 
12 :40 P.M., Luncheon at Gilbert-Addoms. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Sunday, 5:45 P.M., Service of Holy Com- 
munion Fellowship Supper. Afterwards adjourn to 
Episcopal Center. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Hugh Anderson, Professor of 
Biblical Criticism and Theology, The Divinity School, 
will deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, February 23rd in 
the University Chapel. 

The order of worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 
Chaplain to the University. 

Lector: Miss Charlotte Bunch, President, North Carolina Meth- 
odist Student Movement. 

Opening Organ Voluntary — Concerto no. V in F Major Handel 
Larghetto, Allegro, Alia Sieiliana, Presto 

Choral Call To Worship — ' ' The Lord Is In His Holy Temple ' ' 

Laufer 

Hymn of Adoration — "O For A Thousand Tongues To Sing" 

Carl G. Glower 
Arr. by Lowell Mason 

Prayers of Confession and For Pardon 

Words of Assurance 

The Lord 's Prayer 

Anthem — ' ' Kyrie ' ' 

(First public performance) 

Scripture Lesson — Matthew 5:1-12 

Hymn— "My Faith Looks Up To Thee" 

Call To Prayer 

Prayer of Thanksgiving 

Prayers of Intercession and Petition 

The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "O Thou Fortress of Zion's Daughter" Barh 

Response — The Doxology 

Prayer of Dedication 

Sermon— "Faith and Its Fruit" 



James Young 



Lowell Mason 



Prayer 

Benediction 

Choral Response — "Sevenfold Amen" Stainer 

The Chimes 

Closing Organ Voluntary — Andante from 

Concerto I in G Major Handel 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the sermon 
at the University Service of Worship next Sunday, 
March 1st, is the Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, 
the Dean of the Chapel. This will be Dean Cleland 's 
last sermon in the Chapel before he and Mrs. Cleland 
leave on March 13 for Scotland, where he will deliver 
the Warrack Lectures on Preaching at the Divinity 
Halls of the four Scottish Universities. They hope to 
return to Duke for the opening of the new academic 
year in September. Dean Cleland has been asked to 
repeat on March 1 a sermon which he last preached in 
the Chapel in 1957 on Abraham, Isaac and Jacob : 
"Three Laymen and God." Dean Cleland also is 
scheduled to be the Presiding Minister in the Chapel 
on March 8th. 



LENTEN SERVICES 
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN CENTERS 

On each of the Sunday nights in Lent, the Campus 
Christian Centers are presenting a series of forums. 
The theme of this series is : For the Life of the World: 
A Study of God's Affirmation of Human Existence. 
The sessions will be held at the Episcopal Student 
Center each Sunday night at 7 :15 P.M. The nightly 
presentations will be followed by discussion. The five 
remaining topics are : 

"The Incarnation: Man in Dilemma and God as Deliverer" 

"The Incarnation and Identity: The Fulness of Man in a 
Redeemed Creation" 

"The Incarnation and the Church: The Communitv Gathered 
for the Life of the World" 

"The Incarnation and Existence: The Christian's Understand- 
ing of Himself ' 

"The Incarnation and Existence: The Christian in the Uni- 
versity ' ' 

The University community is cordially invited to 
participate in these forums. 



MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR 
DAVID D. HOLT, '61 

Memorial services for David D. Holt, '61, will be 
conducted in the chancel of the University Chapel on 
Monday, February 24th at 5 :00 P.M., by Dean James 
T. Cleland, Professor Stuart C. Henry and Chaplain 
Howard C. Wilkinson. Lt. Holt is presumed dead in 
the disappearance of his plane in the Pacific Ocean, 
January 1. 

POLANYI LECTURE 

The third lecture in the series of five major lectures 
by Professor Michael Polanyi will be given on Monday 
evening, February 24th at 7:30 p.m. in the Music 
Room, East Duke Building. Professor Polanyi is in 
residence during the current semester as James B. 
Duke distinguished professor in the Department of 
Religion : he is widely regarded as one of the most 
distinguished living philosophers of the western world. 
Trained in the field of medicine, he has been Professor 
of Physical Chemistry in England and subsequently 
has held distinguished posts at Princeton, University 
of Chicago, and at Stanford's Institute of Advanced 



[3] 



Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. The usual Tues- 
day seminar will follow on February 25th at 3:30 
p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL FACULTY LECTURE 

Dr. William F. Stinespring, Professor of Old 
Testament, will deliver the annual Faculty Lecture in 
the Divinity School, York Chapel, on Wednesday, 
February 26, at 11 o'clock. Dr. Stinespring 's subject 
is "Temple Research in Jerusalem." 



POETRY LECTURE 

Professor Denis Donoghue of the University of 
Dublin, Ireland, will be the guest of the Department 
of English on Tuesday, February 25th. That evening 
at 8:15 p.m. he will lecture on "Three Directions in 
Modern American Poetry" in the Green Room, East 
Duke Building. Mr. Donoghue, currently Visiting 
Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, is the 
author of several dozen essays on modern British and 
American literature and of a volume on modern 
poetic drama, The Third Voice. Two other volumes 
of his literary criticism are forthcoming. 

The public is cordially invited to attend the lecture. 

PHI BETA KAPPA MEETING 

The annual spring business meeting of the Duke 
Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa will be held on Wednes- 
day, February 26th, at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 205 Divin- 
ity School. Undergraduate, alumnus, and honorary 
elections will be considered. Plans for the spring 
dinner and initiation will be presented. All members 
presently on the campus are urged to be present. In- 
quiries should be directed to the Secretary, Professor 
W. F. Stinespring, 105 Divinity School. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
February 26th at 4 :15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Ralph Morrison, 
Department of Biology, Woman's College, University 
of North Carolina, will speak on "The Biology of a 
Plant Parasite." 

After receiving his undergraduate training at 
William and Mary College, Dr. Morrison earned his 
doctorate at Indiana University in 1960, and has con- 
tinued his investigations on infections caused by 
powdery mildew fungi. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council Meeting will be held on 
Thursday, February 27th at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. The program will be a discussion 
led by Professor William L. Culberson of the Uni- 
versity grounds and their plantings. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will hold a seminar, 
Thursday, February 27th at 2 :00 p.m. in Room M-204 



Davison Building. Dr. Karl-Heinz Gertz, Department 
of Physiology, The Free University of Berlin will 
speak on " Transtubular Fluxes in the Proximal 
Tubule of Rat Kidney." 

INTERNATIONAL CLUB DINNER 
The Duke University International Club will hold 
a dinner and discussion meeting on Thursday, Febru- 
ary 27th at 5 :45 p.m. in the Dining Hall of the Men's 
Graduate Center. Dr. Kurt Back of the Sociology 
Department will speak at 6 :30 on ' ' Problems in 
Population Control." All are welcome. 

CHARLES EDWARD EATON 
IN POETRY READING 

Charles Edward Eaton, poet from Woodbury, 
Connecticut, will read selections from his poems on 
Thursday, February 27th at 7:30 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. Sponsored jointly by the English 
Department and the Student LTnion, Mr. Eaton comes 
to Duke under the auspices of the North Carolina 
Poetry Circuit. He is the author of several volumes 
of poetry, of which the latest, entitled Countermoves, 
was published in 1962. He is a North Carolinian who 
at one time studied with Robert Frost and who has 
taught at U.N.C. and in Puerto Rico and has lived in 
South America. Mr. Eaton's reading will be open to 
the public without charge. 

NATIONAL LAW CONFERENCE 
"SOVIET IMPACT ON INTERNATIONAL LAW" 

A national conference entitled "Soviet Impact on 
International Law" will be held at Duke Law School, 
Friday, February 28th and Saturday, February 29th. 
The conference is sponsored by Duke University, The 
American Society of International Law, the Associa- 
tion of Student International Law Societies and the 
World Rule of Law Center. Various topics will be 
discussed including the Soviet attitudes toward the 
UN, third party adjudication, space law, nuclear 
weapons, wars of national liberation, trade and foreign 
aid. Speakers will include many distinguished persons 
such as Luther Hodges (Secretary of Commerce) and 
Richard Gardner (Deputv Assistant Secretary of 
State). 

Staged primarily as a meeting of professionals in 
the field of international law and international rela- 
tions, the conference sessions will be open to the public, 
providing seats are available. A general registration 
fee of $.50 will be charged. Reservations for the 
dinners and luncheons and further information may 
be obtained by writing; Conference Committee. Box 
4627, Duke Station, or by calling ext. 2298 at the Law 
School. 



ART DEPARTMENT LECTURE 

Dr. W. S. Heckscher, Professor of Art History and 
Director of the Iconological Institute of the University 
of Utrecht, will give an illustrated lecture on "The 
Significance of Van Eyck's Portraits" in Room 204 
East Duke Building on Friday, February 28th at 4 :00 
p.m. Dr. Heckscher is currently a visiting professor 
at the University of Pittsburgh, has been a member 
of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, at 
frequent intervals, and was a Fellow of the Folger 
Shakespeare Library, Washington, D. C, in 1960 and 



f41 



1963. The lecture is sponsored by the Department of 
Art with support from the Mary Duke Biddle Founda- 
tion. 



TENTH CONFERENCE ON 
TEACHING THE SOCIAL STUDIES 

The Tenth Conference on Teaching the Social 
Studies will be held on Friday and Saturday, Febru- 
ary 28th and 29th with the theme, "Asia," a Con- 
ference for Elementary and Secondary School Teach- 
ers of Social Studies Supervisors, and Administrators. 
The schedule follows: 

Friday, February 28th 
2:30-3:00 p.m. General Session. Woman's College Audi- 
torium. Speaker: Dr. Joseph J. Spengler. 
4 : 00-5 : 00 p.m. General Session. Woman 's College Audi- 
torium. Speaker : Dr. Ralph Braibanti. 
6:00-8:00 p.m. Banquet. Ballroom, West Campus Union. 
(By reservation only) 
Saturday, February 29th 
9:00-10:15 p.m. General Session. Woman's College Audi- 
torium. Speaker: Dr. William L. Rowe. 
10:45-12:00 noon. General Session. Woman's College Audi- 
torium. Speaker: Dr. George T. Yu. 
12:30-2:00 p.m. Luncheon. Ballroom, West Campus Union. 
Speaker: Dr. Robert A. Rupen. (By reservation only) 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly semi- 
nar on Friday, February 28th in the auditorium of 
the Physics Building at 4:15 p.m. Professor J. P. 
Trinkaus, Department of Zoology, Yale University, 
will speak on ' ' Cell Segregation in Mixed Aggregates. ' ' 

CHI EPSILON BANQUET 

Chi Epsilon, the newly organized Civil Engineer- 
ing Honorary Fraternity, will be entertained at a 
banquet on Friday, February 28th at 6 :30 p.m. in the 
Old Trinity Room of West Union Building. Follow- 
ing the presentation of the Charter the main address 
will be given by Dr. W. Brewster Snow, Chapter 
Honor Member, and Professor of Civil Engineering 
at Rutgers University. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
AIRCADE 

On Monday, March 2nd, Duke University and the 
Durham Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a pro- 
gram presented by the National Chamber of Commerce 
to stinmlate citizenship participation in government. 

The program will begin at 9 :25 a.m. at Page Audi- 
torium. Panelists will include Arch Booth and Ed- 
ward B. Neilan of the National Chamber of Commerce 
and noted business and industrial leaders. This will 
be an audience participation program, with questions 
being submitted from the floor. Issues such as tax- 
ation, medicare, spending policies, etc., will be dis- 
cussed. 

A catered luncheon will be served in the Indoor 
Stadium. This will be followed by the conclusion of 
the program in Page Auditorium. Adjournment will 
be at 3 :30 p.m. 

The cost of $7.00, including the luncheon. All inter- 
ested faculty, staff, and students are requested to call 
or write the local Chamber of Commerce for tickets. 
Business men will be flying to Duke from a seven- 
state area. Participation must be limited to 1,200 
people, with ticket requests being filled as they are 



received. Interested members of the University Com- 
munity are urged to submit their ticket requests with- 
out delay. 

JOINT CONCERT OF 
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S GLEE CLUBS 

The combined voices of the Men's and Women's 
Glee Clubs will join in performances of works by 
Gabrielli, Schutz and Leisring in a special concert 
to be given at Page Auditorium at 8 :15 p.m. on Fri- 
day, February 28th. Tickets, priced at $1.00 general 
admission, will be available at the door on the evening 
of the concert. 

James Young, acting director of choral activities 
will conduct the concert, accompanied by William 
Watson, '64, and John C. Ruggero, '68. A Brass Choir 
of two trumpeters and three trombonists from the 
Duke Band will perform in the featured combined 
choral numbers. 

The program follows : 



The Testament of Freedom 



II 



Randall Thompson 



Richard Donovan 



Fantasy on American Folk Ballads 
Farewell, my friends 
Old Bangum 

In the township of Danville 
Reuben Ranzo 

Jay Campbell, baritone solo 

John Miller, tenor solo 

John Ruggero and William Watson, pianists 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



INTERMISSION 
III 



Gabriel Faure 



Messe Basse 

pour voix de femmes 
Kyrie 
Sanctus 
Benedictus 
Agnus Dei 

William Watson, pianist 

IV 

Liebeslieder Waltzer (a selection) Johannes Brahms 

John Ruggero and William Watson, pianists 

WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 



Lift up your Heads, ye Mighty Gates Volkmar Leisring 

Ponder my words, O Lord Heinrich Schutz 

In ecclesiis Giovanni Gabrieli 

Bill Prizer, Ron Vaughn, Ed Keller, trumpets 

Tom Anderson, Ben Peck, trombones 

William Watson, pianist 

COMBINED GLEE CLUBS 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

ARTISTS SERIES: PRESTI AND LAGOYA, 

GUITAR DUO 

The Duke University Artists Series will present 
Presti and Lagoya, duo-guitarists, Tuesday, March 
10th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Ida Presti 
and Alexandre Lapoya had both established them- 
selves as solo concert artists of considerable distinc- 
tion when, in 1955 they joined forces to form a 
guitar-duo. In the years since, Presti-Lagoya have 
won critical praise and fervent audience acclaim in 
Europe, North Africa, India and Australia. In their 
unique and fascinating 1 programs Presti and Lagoya 
combine original works for guitar-duo with superb 



[5] 



transcriptions ranging from Bach and Scarlatti to 
Albeniz and Debussy. Tickets priced at $2.50 and 
$2.00 are available in 202A Flowers Building, or call 
extension 2911 for reservations. 



ART LOAN COLLECTION 

The Department of Art announces that the Art 
Loan Collection is available for rental in Room 103 
Asbury Building, Monday through Friday between 
9 :00 a.m. and 5 :00 p.m. The collection contains re- 
productions of contemporary art and also some origi- 
nals. The pictures are rented per semester. Rental 
fee is $3.00 to be paid in advance. A few Student 
Loan Reproductions are also available, free of charge. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ECONOMICS LECTURE 

Professor Joseph J. Spengler will give the third 
in a series of public lectures on current economic 
issues on Tuesday evening, March 3rd at 8 :00 p.m. in 
Room 130, Sociology and Psychology Building. His 
subject will be "The Population Explosion." The 
University Community and the Public are cordially 
invited. 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows: 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC — Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 



THE ERASMUS CLUB PRIZE IN THE 
HUMANITIES 
The Erasmus Club Prize in the Humanities is 
awarded annually to an undergraduate for the best 
essay embodying the results of research, criticism, 
or evaluation on some subject in the humanities. The 
value of the prize has this year been raised to $50.00, 
and a second prize of $20.00 will also be offered. 
Contestants should conuslt with some member of the 
faculty, preferably a professor in their major field 
about the essay before submitting it. Essays must be 
submitted to the Secretary of the Erasmus Club, Dr. 
Marcel Tetel, 202 Languages Building (or in his 
absense to the Romance Languages office, 205 Lan- 
guages Building) on or before April 6, 1964. The two 
prize-winning papers will be deposited in the Erasmus 
Club archives; all others will be available to their 
authors on or after May 4, 1964. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

STUDENTS CHAMBER MUSIC 

AND ORGAN RECITAL 

The Music Department will present a Students 
Chamber Music and Organ Recital in the Alice M. 
Baldwin Auditorium on Sunday, March 1st at 4 :00 
p.m. The organists for the recital are all students of 
Mildred L. Hendrix ; they will be joined by other 
student members of the Department of Music. 

The program follows : 

PROGRAM 

Trio Sonata for Strings and Organ Areangelo Corelli 

(1653-1713) 
Op. 1, No. 1 in F Major 
Grave, Allegro, 
Adagio, Allegro 

Terry Seott, organ 
Sonata for Strings and Organ No. 10 in D Major (K245) 

Allegro Mozart 

(1756-1791) 
Annette Brisendine, organ 
Sonata II for Two Recorders and Thorough Bass 

Areangelo Corelli 
Andante Largo 
Allemanda Allegro 
Corrente Allegro 
Gavotta Allegro 

May Bates, Alto recorder 

Carol Papps, Alto recorder 

Alice Williams, organ 

Chorale "Praise to the Lord" Harald Rohlig 

Ronald Steed, baritone 

Judith Weingarth, organ 

Concerto in F Major No. 13 for Organ and Orchestra 

George Frederic Handel 
(1685-1759) 
' ' The Cuckoo and the Nightingale : ' ' 
Larghetto ) first two movements 
Allegro \ 

William B. Trexler, organ 
Larghetto / ]ast 
Allegro ) 

Jere Farrah, organ 
Chorale Fantasie on ' ' Christ the Lord Has Risen ' ' 

Flor Peeters 
(1903- ) 
Allegro Maestoso 

Two Trumpets, two trombones, and organ 
John Simpson, organ 



st two movements 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 
The Erasmus Club will meet on Monday, March 
2nd at 8 :00 p.m. in the Green Room, East Duke 
Building. Professor Sidney Markman of the Art De- 
partment wil speak on: "The Stylistic Development 
of the Architecture of Antigua, Guatamala, 1542- 
1773." The lecture will be illustrated with slides and 
is open to all interested persons. 



UNDERGRADUATE 
BOOK COLLECTORS CONTEST 

The prize contest for Undergraduate Book Collec- 
tors is sponsored jointly by The Friends of Duke 
University Library and the Gothic Bookshop, and is 
open to all Undergraduates. Three prizes — of respec- 
tively $100, $60 and $40 worth of books, winner's 
choice — will be awarded this year. The closing date 
is April 8th. For full details see Jeremy North at the 
Gothic Bookshop. 



[6] 



WEEK OF 

Mar. 1-7, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 

Mar. 1-7, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, March 1 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 

Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Professor 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon : 
"Three Lavmen and God." Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union Chess Club. Room 

204 Flowers Building. 
6:00 p.m. Guest Organ Recital: Mr. Robert Triplett. 

Methodist Student Center. 
7:15 p.m. Lenten Service, Episcopal Student Center. 

Monday, March 2 

9:25 a.m. Duke University and Durham Chamber 
of Commerce Aircade. Page Auditorium. 
Panelists: Mr. Arch Booth and Edward B. 

Neilan. 

4:00 p.m. Classical Studies Lecture. Room 208 
Flowers Building. Speaker: Dr. G. Nikolaus 
Ivnauer. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. William 
Dall. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. Religion Lecture: Professor Michael 
Polanyi. Music Room, East Duke Building. 



8:00 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Green Room, 
East Duke Building. Speaker: Professor 
Sidney Markman. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, March 3 



10:10 

12:30- 

2:00 

3:30- 
3:30- 

4:00 

4:00 

4:15- 
5:00 
5:00- 



a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Harmon L. Smith. 

1 :30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students Vol- 
leyball. 

p.m. Joint Theoretical-Experimental Seminar. 
Physics Building. Speaker: Professor H. 
Maier-Leibnitz. 

■5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

■5:00 p.m. Religion Department Seminar on 
Professor Polanyi 's Lectui'e. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Room 114 Physics 
Building. Speaker : Professor A. F. Horadam. 
p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Classics Faculty Col- 
loquium. Seminar Room, Murphey Hall, 
Chapel Hill. Speaker : Dr. G. Nikolaus Knauer. 

6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

p.m. Gerontology Seminar. Room MHO Medi- 
cal School. Speaker: Dr. Margaret A. Ohlson. 

6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



5:30 p.m. Trinity College Historical Society Meet- 
ing. Men's Graduate Center. Speaker: Pro- 
fessor Arthur S. Link. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 
Floor, Card Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. Economics Lecture. Koom 130 Sociology 
and Psychology Building. Speaker: Professor 
Joseph J. Spengler. 

Wednesday, March 4 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Harmon L. Smith. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium. Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Carl J. 
Sindermann. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

7:00 p.m. Engineering R-eview Lectures (E.I.T.) 
Room 139 Engineering Building. Speaker: 
Mr. J. M. Hunt. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Badminton Open House. Woman's 
College Gymnasium. Open to all faculty, staff, 
and students. 

7:00 and 9:20 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Trial and Error" with Peter 
Sellers and Richard Attenborough. "The two 
actors are nimble and droll. ' ' — Crowther, N. Y. 
Times. " A steady gale of wild laughter ! Peter 
Sellers' sly, sneaky style of humor creeps mis- 
chievously through." — Cook, World Telegram. 
(Today only) 

8:15 p.m. Parapsychology Lecture. Music Room, 
East Duke Building. Speaker: Dr. K. Rama- 
krishna Rao. 

Thursday, March 5 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. J. L. Bryan. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology-Pharmacology Seminar. Room 
M-204 Davison Building. Speaker : Dr. Edwin 
W. Taylor. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

6 :00 p.m. Divinity Dames Supper. Union Ballroom. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 
Card Gymnasium. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:00 p.m. North Carolina Sub-Section of P.G.E.D. 
Meeting. Camille Dreyfus Auditorium, Re- 
search Triangle Institute Campus. Speaker: 
Dr. R. W. Lade. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 



children will be admitted 
panied by their parents. 



only when accom- 



Friday, March 6 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Harmon L. Smith. Mr. Clay H. Turner. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Professor 
B. L. Slobodkin. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

7:30 p.m. Bowling for faculty members and families 
at Sportland. Regular rates apply. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "The Zoo 
Story" and "The American Dream" by Ed- 
ward Albee. Page Auditorium. 



Saturday, March 7 



2:15 



p.m. Duke Players Matinee Performance : "The 
Zoo Story" and "The American Dream" by 
Edward Albee. Page Auditorium. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance : "The Zoo 
Story" and "The American Dream" by Ed- 
ward Albee. Page Auditorium. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Sunday, Rides leave East and West circles at 1 :45 
P.M. for the Sunday School program at the Murdoch 
School at Butner. " Friday, 6:15 P.M., Supper, fol- 
lowed by election of new Executive Council. Seminars 
following to be : Mr. Charles Wellborn on Bishop 
Robinson's Honest to God; Chaplain Stines — "Some 
Implications of the Christian Faith for a Philosophy 
of Language." 

March 14-15 : The Duke Baptist Student Union is 
sponsoring a retreat at Camp New Hope. Dr. W. D. 
White will be the speaker. Any interested persons are 
invited to register now at the Baptist Center. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9:30 A.M., Holy Communion; 7:15 P.M., 
Lenten Ecumenical Forum. Wednesday, 7:10 A.M. 
and 5 :30 P.M., Holy Communion. Friday, 7 :10 A.M., 
Holy Communion ; 4 :00 P.M., Seminar : ' ' Christianity 
and Modern Man." 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chap- 
lain William R. Patton) : Monday, 5:30 P.M., Men's 
Graduate Center, Supper meeting and discussion of 
Honest to God by Bishop J. A. T. Robinson. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, 9:00 
A.M., Seminar. Honest to God, Discussion will be pre- 



[?1 



ceded by a light breakfast; 6:00 P.M., Program of 
Sacred Organ Music, Mr. Robert Triplett, Organist. 
Thursday, 5:30 P.M., Men's Graduate Center, Semi- 
nar: "Social Legislation": Discussion on alternate 
Thursday evenings on such topics as urban affairs, 
automation, civil rights, pressure groups, and public 
opinion. Go through cafeteria line and bring your 
tray to the small dining room. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Sunday, Interdenominational Fellowship 
Supper (50c). Afterwards participate in Lenten 
Series. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., Home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Fairbank, 1515 Pinecrest Road. 
After supper, Dr. Fairbank will speak on ' ' The Rela- 
tionships of Science and Religion." Thursday, 12:40 
P.M., Luncheon at Gilbert-Addoms. 



THE UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of 
the Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, March 
1st in the University Chapel. 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, March 8th, is the Reverend Dr. Howard C. 
Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University and Director of 
Religious Activities. He expects to preach on "The 
Uninvested. ' ' 



GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 
METHODIST CENTER 

The Methodist Center is pleased to present Mr. 
Robert Triplett, Organist, in a program of sacred 
music on Sunday evening March 1st at 6 :00 p.m., at 
the Methodist Center. Mr. Triplett is a member of the 
music on Sunday evening, March 1st at 6 :00 p.m., at 
University of Georgia and Union Theological Semi- 
nary in New York. The University community is 
cordially invited to attend. 



LENTEN SERVICES 

On each of the Sunday nights in Lent, the Campus 
Christian Centers are presenting a series of forums. 
The theme of this series is: For the Life of the 
World: A Study of God's Affirmation of Human Ex- 
istence. The sessions are being held at the Episcopal 
Student Center each Sunday night at 7 :15 p.m. The 
nightly presentations will be followed by discussion. 
The four remaining topics are : 

"The Incarnation and Identity: The Fulness of 
Man in a Redeemed Creation" 

"The Incarnation and the Church: The Com- 
munity Gathered for the Life of the World" 

"The Incarnation and Existence: The Christian's 
Understanding of Himself" 

"The Incarnation and Existence : The Christian in 
the University" 

The University community is cordially invited to 
participate in these forums. 



AIRCADE 

On Monday, March 2nd, Duke University and the 
Durham Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a pro- 
gram presented by the National Chamber of Commerce 
to stimulate citizenship participation in government. 

The program will begin at 9 :25 a.m. at Page Audi- 
torium. Panelists will include Arch Booth and Ed- 
ward B. Neilan of the National Chamber of Commerce 
and noted business and industrial leaders. This will 
be an audience participation program, with questions 
being submitted from the floor. Issues such as tax- 
ation, medicare, spending policies, etc., will be dis- 
cussed. 

A catered luncheon will be served in the Indoor 
Stadium. This will be followed by the conclusion of 
the program in Page Auditorium. Adjournment will 
be at 3 :30 p.m. 

The cost of $7.00, including the luncheon. All inter- 
ested faculty, staff, and students are requested to call 
or write the local Chamber of Commerce for tickets. 
Business men will be flying to Duke from a seven- 
state area. Participation must be limited to 1,200 
people, with ticket requests being filled as they are 
received. Interested members of the University Com- 
munity are urged to submit their ticket requests with- 
out delay. 



CLASSICAL STUDIES LECTURE 
Dr. G. Nokolaus Knauer, distinguished young 
Latinist of the Free University of Berlin, will be the 
guest of the Department of Classical Studies on Mon- 
day, March 2nd and Tuesday, March 3rd. Author of 
a book and several essays on Saint Augustine, he will 
lecture on the subject of his forthcoming book, 
"Vergil's Aeneid and Homer," at 4:00 p.m. Monday, 
March 2nd, in Room 208 Flowers Building. The 
lecture is open to all interested persons. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, March 2nd in the Auditorium of 
the Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Dr. 
William Dall, Department of Zoology, University of 
Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, will speak on 
"Terminal Carbohydrate Metabolism in a Penaeid 
Shrimp." Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer 
at 4 :00. 



TRINITY COLLEGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

The Trinity College Historical Society will hold its 
fifth dinner meeting in the private dining room of the 
Men's Graduate Center on Tuesday, March 3rd. A 
special cafeteria line will begin to serve members 
promptly at 5 :30 p.m. The speaker, Professor Arthur 
S. Link of Princeton University, is an authority on 
Woodrow Wilson and his times, and is among the most 
distinguished of contemporary American historians. 
Dr. Link has to date published three volumes of his 
life of Wilson. His paper, entitled: "The Strange 
Story of the House-Grey Memorandum" deals with 
an aspect of the controversy as to whether Wilson, 
early in 1916, intended to involve the U. S. in the 
First World War. 



[31 



Those interested in attending the meeting are re- 
quested to notify the TCHS President, Mr. Tony 
Woods, via Carrell 609, West Library or the History 
Department Office in Allen Building by 5 :00 p.m. on 
Monday, March 2nd. 

POLANYI LECTURE 

The fourth lecture in the series of five major lec- 
tures by Professor Michael Polanyi will be given on 
Monday evening, March 2nd at 7 :30 p.m. in the Music 
Room, East Duke Building. Professor Polanyi is in 
residence during the current semester as James B. 
Duke distinguished professor in the Department of 
Religion ; he is widely regarded as one of the most 
distinguished living philosophers of the western world. 
Trained in the field of medicine, he has been Professor 
of Physical Chemistry in England and subsequently 
has held distinguished posts at Princeton, University 
of Chicago, and at Stanford's Institute of Advanced 
Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. The usual Tues- 
day seminar will follow on March 3rd at 3 :30 p.m. 
in Room 208 Flowers Building. 



ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will meet on Monday, Mareh 
2nd at 8 :00 p.m. in the Green Room, East Duke 
Building. Professor Sidney Markman of the Art De- 
partment will speak on: "The Stylistic Development 
of the Architecture of Antigua. Guatamala. 1542- 
1773." The lecture will be illustrated with slides and 
is open to all interested persons. 

JOINT THEORETICAL-EXPERIMENTAL 
SEMINAR 

The Physics Department will hold a Joint Theo- 
retical-Experimental Seminar on Tuesday, March 3rd 
at 2:00 p.m. in the Physics Building. Professor H. 
Maier-Leibnitz will present a talk on "Neutron 
Optics." 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 
The Department of Mathematics will hold a semi- 
nar, Tuesday, March 3rd, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 114 
Physics Building. Professor A. F. Horadam, Uni- 
versity of New England, New South Wales, Australia 
and University of North Carolina, will speak on 
"Generalized Fibonacci Numbers." Coffee will be 
served at 3 :30 in Room 120 Phvsics Building. 



PARAPSYCHOLOGY LECTURE 

Dr. K. Ramakrishna Rao, Research Associate, 
Parapsychology Laboratory, will present a public 
lecture entitled "Parapsychology and the Nature of 
Man." Dr. Rao will speak in the Music Room, East 
Duke Building, on Wednesday, March 4th at 8:15 
p.m. The public is cordially invited to attend. 



ECONOMICS LECTURE 

Professor Joseph J. Spengler will give the third 
in a series of public lectures on current economic 
issues on Tuesday evening, Mareh 3rd at 8 :00 p.m. in 
Room 130, Sociology and Psychology Building. His 
subject will be "The Population Explosion." The 
university community and public are cordially invited. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
March 4th at 4:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Carl J. Sinder- 
mann, Director of the Biological Laboratory, Bureau 
of Commercial Fisheries at Oxford, Maryland, will 
speak on "Fungus Disease Epizootics in Marine 
Animals." 

As a parasitologist Dr. Sindermann has been in- 
terested in the diseases and immunogenetics of marine 
organisms. His present position as Director of the 
Biological Laboratory follows by some thirteen years 
the completion of his graduate work at Harvard. In 
the interregnum he has served in various capacities as 
a marine biologist and administrator and at one time 
was on the faculty at Brandeis. 

A refreshment period will precede the meeting at 
4 :00 p.m. in the foyer. 



GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Duke University Council on Gerontology will 
hold a seminar on Tuesday, March 3rd at 5 :00 p.m. 
in Room MHO Medical School. Dr. Margaret A. 
Ohlson, Director, Department of Nutrition, State 
University of Iowa, will speak on "Food Selection in 
Relation to the Health of the Elderly." The public 
is cordially invited to attend. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 
will hold a seminar Thursday, March 5th at 4 :00 p.m. 
in Room M-204 Davison Building. Dr. Edwin W. 
Taylor, University of Chicago, will speak on "Studies 
on the Mechanism of Inhibition of Mitosis by 
Colchicine. 



DIVINITY DAMES SUPPER 
The Divinity Dames will have a "Covered Dish 
Supper" on Thursday, March 5th at 6:00 p.m. in the 
Union Ballroom. Entertainment will be singing led 
by Sam Harmon, and a children 's program led by Kip 
Neeves. All members of the Divinity School and their 
families are invited. 



INFORMAL MEETING OF (UNORGANIZED) 
N. C. SUB-SECTION OF P.G.E.D. 

There will be an informal meeting of the N C. 
Sub-Section of P.G.E.D. (unorganized) on Thursday, 
March 5th at 8 :00 p.m. in the Camille Dreyfus Audi- 
torium, Research Triangle Institute Campus. Dr. 
R. W. Lade, Department of Electrical Engineering, 
"North Carolina State College," Raleigh, will speak 
on "Ohmie Contacts To Germanium and Silicon." 
This is the initial open meeting of a group interested 
in discussing electron devices and related research. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Zoology Department will hold a seminar on 
Friday, March 6th in the Auditorium of the Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Professor B. L. 
Slobodkin, Department of Zoology, University of 



[4] 



Michigan, will speak ou "Experimental Populations 
of Hybrids." Coffee and tea will be served in the 
forer at 4 :00. 



DUKE PLAYERS PERFORMANCES 

"The Zoo Story" and "The American Dream" 

Edward Albee's plays "The Zoo Story" and "The 
American Dream" will be presented by Duke Players 
on Friday, March 6th and Saturday, March 7th at 
8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium, with a Saturday mati- 
nee at 2:00 p.m. The plays are directed by Kenneth 
Reardon with Victor Michalak as technical director. 

Perhaps the most prolific and controversial man 
in the American Theatre today, Edward Albee writes 
with piercing intensity and keen wit of the American 
scene. His "Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf" is still 
running on Broadway and recently his "The Ballad 
of the Sad Cafe" proved to be one of the most unusual 
productions of the season. 



RECITAL POSTPONED 

The Music Department Student Chamber 
Music and Organ Recital originally scheduled 
for Sunday, March 1st, has been postponed until 
Friday, May 8th at 8:15 p.m. in the Alice M. 
Baldwin Auditorium. 



ART EXHIBITIONS 

West Gallery — "Modern Religious Prints" 

The Student Union's Fine Arts Committee an- 
nounces the opening of a distinguished exhibition, 
"Modern Religious Prints," now on display in the 
Alumni Lounge of West Union Building. It may be 
seen without charge until the 22nd of March. 

An exhibition of 48 prints by 32 artists and 
selected by Miss Elaine L. Johnson, Assistant Curator 
of Drawings and Prints at the Museum of Modern 
Art, New York ; the exhibition was organized for 
circulation by the Museum's Department of Circulat- 
ing Exhibitions. All but two loans are from the 
Museum Collection. 

Prints in the exhibition range in date from Bres- 
din's Good Samaritan of 1861 to Watanabe's People 
Visiting the Stable of 1962. The hundred years 
spanned by the prints begins with the height of na- 
turalism and continues through such movements as 
impressionism, surrealism, and abstract expressionism. 
Included are wood-cuts, etchings, lithographs, and 
stencils. 

The majority of works illustrate episodes from the 
Bible, particularly the Old Testament. Chagall has 
three works included ; other Old Testament figures, 
both virtuous and villainous, are presented by 
Corinth's Cain and two interpretations each of the 
Jonah and Noah stories. Familiar scenes in unex- 
pected form are the Destruction of Sodom by the 
Japanese artist Kanamori and the equivocal Judg- 
ment of Solomon by Pascin. 

Incidents from the New Testament emphasize the 
drama of Christ's life. Several versions of the Three 
Kings are included, as well as five portrayals of 



Christ on the Cross created by artists of such varying 
viewpoint as the post-impressionist, Emile Bernard, 
the expressionists Nolde and Rouault, the School of 
Paris master Villon, and the Italian contemporary 
Marcello Muceini. Also shown are illustrations of 
Christ's teachings, such as Forains' The Prodigal Son. 
Apocryphal, legendary, and historical subjects not 
included in the Bible are given fresh life by Baskin's 
Tobias and the Angel (the only wood engraving in the 
exhibition), Dali's St. George and the Dragon, and 
Redon's illustrations for Flaubert's The Temptation 
of St. Anthony. 



EAST GALLERY ART EXHIBIT 

Works by Edith London 

The Gallery in the East Campus Library will house 
an exhibition of recent works by Edith London dur- 
ing the month of March. Mrs. London, who came to 
Duke in 1939 when her husband, the late Dr. Fritz 
London joined the University's Physics Department, 
is known throughout the area as an artist of un- 
common ability. She has studied in her native Berlin 
and in Paris with the internationally esteemed artists, 
Marcel Gromaire and Andre Lhote. However, her 
art owes much to her own sensitive and thoughtful 
nature and to many years of perceptive seeing. Al- 
though her work is distinguished by its delicacy of 
color and texture, one cannot overlook the intellectual 
discipline of composition and form that underlies the 
more sensuous aspect of her style. 

The exhibition is composed of 27 items of which 15 
are oils, 6, pen and ink drawings ; and 6, collages. 
Several private collectors have loaned works for the 
exhibition, and the North Carolina Museum of Art has 
generously sent two of Mrs. London's works from its 
collections. The inclusion of several earlier paintings 
allows one to see the evolution of Mrs. London 's style 
to the complete abstraction evident in her most recent 
canvases. Certainly, her increasing use of the medium 
of collage stands as a contributing factor to her 
current investigation of the evocative and associative 
qualities of color, form, and texture, uneonfined by the 
limitations of recognizable subject matter. Her works 
invite long and increasingly enriching contemplation. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

ARTISTS SERIES: PRESTI AND LAGOYA, 

GUITAR DUO 

The Duke University Artists Series will present 
Presti and Lagoya, duo-guitarists, Tuesday, March 
10th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Ida Presti 
and Alexandre Lagoya had both established them- 
selves as solo concert artists of considerable distinc- 
tion when, in 1955 they joined forces to form a 
guitar-duo. In the years since, Presti-Lagoya have 
won critical praise and fervent audience acclaim in 
Europe, North Africa, India and Australia. In their 
unique and fascinating programs Presti and Lagoya 
combine original works for guitar-duo with superb 
transcriptions ranging from Bach and Scarlatti to 
Albeniz and Debussy. Tickets priced at $2.50 and 
$2.00 are available in 202A Flowers Building, or call 
extension 2911 for reservations. 



[51 



FRENCH AND SPANISH EXAMINATIONS FOR 
CANDIDATES FOR GRADUATE DEGREES 

The French and Spanish examinations for candi- 
dates for Graduate degrees will be held on April 10, 
1964, 4 :00 p.m., in Room 113 Physics Building. Candi- 
dates register for these examinations not later than 
March 26, 1964 (no exceptions to this deadline) in 
the Graduate School Office, Room 127 Allen Building. 



STUDENT-FACULTY MEMBERSHIP PLAN 
FOR MUSEUM OF MODERN ART 

Realizing the widespread interest among students 
and faculty concerning the development of the visual 
arts of our day, the Museum of Modern Art offers 
a Student Group Membership Plan to colleges and art 
schools outside the New York City area. Through 
this plan, students and faculty may join the Museum 
for the reduced rate of $10.00 between now and 
Friday, March 20th, 1964. 

This membership gives all the privileges of regular 
Non-Resident Membership (otherwise $15.00 a year) 
including four free books and a 25% Members' dis- 
count on Museum publications and color reproductions 
at a 50% discount. 

Further, Members are given reduced subscription 
rates for ' ' Art News, " " Art In America ' ' and ' ' Arts ' ' 
magazines. They receive free bulletins on activities 
in the Museum's varied program, and the Members' 
Calendar of Events which describes all current ex- 
hibitions, new publications, lectures and special events. 

The membership card allows unlimited free ad- 
missions to the galleries (including the daily film 
showings) and use of the Members' penthouse. Stu- 
dent Members may also use the Museum Library which 
contains the world's . . . foremost collection of books, 
periodicals, reference files and photographic archives 
on modern art. Through the Art Lending Service, 
original works of art may be rented with the option 
to buy. The Penthouse Restaurant, which is reserved 
for members, provides a popular meeting place for 
students visiting New York. 

This spring the Student Group Membership Plan 
enters its eighth year with sixty participating col- 
leges and art schools across the country. Reduced 
membership rates for a school of Duke's size go into 
effect when a minimum of twenty (20) students and 
faculty members are enrolled. 

Applications will be made through the Student 
Activities Office, the Acting College Representative, 
in 202A Flowers, or by calling extension 2911. Cheeks 
should be made payable to The Museum of Modern 
Art. 



THE ERASMUS CLUB PRIZE IN THE 
HUMANITIES 

The Erasmus Club Prize in the Humanities is 
awarded annually to an undergraduate for the best 
essay embodying the results of research, criticism, 
or evaluation on some subject in the humanities. The 
value of the prize has this year been raised to $50.00, 
and a second prize of $20.00 will also be offered. 
Contestants should conuslt with some member of the 
facility, preferably a professor in their major field 



about the essay before submitting it. Essays must be 
submitted to the Secretary of the Erasmus Club, Dr. 
Marcel Tetel, 202 Languages Building (or in his 
absense to the Romance Languages office, 205 Lan- 
guages Building) on or before April 6, 1964. The two 
prize-winning papers will be deposited in the Erasmus 
Club archives; all others will be available to their 
authors on or after May 4, 1964. 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows : 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC — Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 



UNDERGRADUATE 
BOOK COLLECTORS CONTEST 

The prize contest for Undergraduate Book Collec- 
tors is sponsored jointly by The Friends of Duke 
University Library and the Gothic Bookshop, and is 
open to all Undergraduates. Three prizes — of respec- 
tively $100. $60 and $40 worth of books, winner's 
choice — will be awarded this year. The closing date 
is April 8th. For full details see Jeremy North at the 
Gothic Bookshop. 



ART LOAN COLLECTION 
The Department of Art announces that the Art 
Loan Collection is available for rental in Room 103 
Asbury Building, Monday through Friday between 
9 :00 a.m. and 5 :00 p.m. The collection contains re- 
productions of contemporary art and also some origi- 
nals. The pictures are rented per semester. Rental 
fee is $3.00 to be paid in advance. A few Student 
Loan Reproductions are also available, free of charge. 



TRIANGLE AREA DRAMA 

Final performances of the Durham Theatre Guild's 
controversial and thought-provoking nlay. "Between 
Two Thieves" by Warner LeRoy, will be given on 
Saturday. February 29th and Sunday. March 1st 
at the Allied Arts Center. 810 "West Proctor Street at 
8:30 p.m. Reservations may be made by calling 
682-5519. 

The Triangle Players will present "A Question of 
Mother" by "Wilton Beauchamp at the Triangle Coff 

•ersity Road, at 9 :30 p.m. on 



i lie mangie ria\ers win present. jA v^uesuuu ui 
Mother" by "Wilton Beauchamp at the Triangle Coffee 
House, 1205 Duke University Road, at 9 :30 p.m. on 
Sunday. March 1st. 



[6] 



WEEK OF 



Mar. 8-14, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Mar. 8-14, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, March 8 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 

Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the Uni- 
versitv. Sermon: "The Uninvested." Broad- 
east over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC- 
FM. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union Chess Club. Room 
204 Flowers Building. 

4:00 p.m. Music Department Student Recital. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

7:15 p.m. Campus Christian Centers Lenten Serv- 
ice. Episcopal Student Center. 



Monday, March 9 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. 
Howard B. Haines. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. Religion Lecture: Professor Michael 
Polanyi. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
facility members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, March 10 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Speaker: Dr. John J. Rudin, II. 
12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
3:00 p.m. Campus Club Tea. Home of Mrs. Douglas 

M. Knight, 2138 Campus Drive. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
3:30 p.m. Seminar on Professor Polanyi 's Lecture. 

Room 208 Flowers Building. 
4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Room 114 Physics 

Building. Speaker: Merrell L. Patrick. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Duke Sailing Club Instruction. Room 

101 West Duke Building. 
7:00 p.m. Pre-Artists Series Seminar. Room 208 

Flowers Building. Speaker: Mr. J. Donald 

McLaughlin. 
8:00 p.m. Joint Duke-UNC Philosophv Colloquium. 

Room 213 Caldwell Hall, University of North 

Carolina. Speaker: Dr. David S. Shwayder. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Artists Series: Presti and Lagoya. 

Page Auditorium. 

Wednesday, March 11 

10:10 a.m. Divinitv School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. John J. Rudin, II. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



11:00 a.m. Divinity School Library Lecture. York 
Chapel. Speaker: Dr. G. Henton Davies. 

4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Room 130 Old 
Biology Building. Speaker: Dr. Herbert S. 
Terrace. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Stewart 
Nielsen. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club. 
Green Room, East Duke Building. 

7:00 p.m. Engineering Review Lectures (E.I.T.). 
Room 139 Engineering Building. Speaker: 
Mr. F. C. Sheppard. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Badminton Open House. Woman's 
College Gymnasium. Open to all faculty, staff, 
and students. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Two Daughters." Award win- 
ning film from India directed by Satyajit Ray. 
"A blend of poetic creation that is almost 
majestic. It touches the universal heart of 
man. A rare experience." — Crowther, N. Y. 
Times. A fragile study of the obtuseness of 
love and blendness of lovers." — Newsweek 
Mag. 

Thursday, March 12 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Speaker: Mr. William E. Lovell. 
11:30 a.m. Engineering Lecture. Room 125 Engi- 
neering Building. Speaker : Mr. P. D. Rossi. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-201 Davison Building. Speaker: 
Dr. Rubin Bressler. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff memhers. and students 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 
Card Gymnasium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

8:15 p.m. Nereidian Show: "Timesweep." East 
Campus Pool. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Concert. 
Page Auditorium. Reception following Concert, 
Flowers Lounge. 

Friday, March 13 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Speakers: Dr. John J. Rudin, II, and Mr. 

Linden W. Damschroder. 
4:00 p.m. Chemistry Seminar. Room 01 Chemistry 

Building. Speaker: Mr. D. S. Bres n ow. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 

Room 208 Asburv Building. 



5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

7:30 p.m. Bowling for faculty members and families 
at Sportland. Regular rates apply. 

8:15 p.m. Recital of Violin and Chamber Music 
performed by students of Joseph Pepper. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

Saturday, March 14 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Two Daughters." Award win- 
ning film from India directed by Satyajit Ray. 
"A blend of poetic creation that is almost 
majestic. It touches the universal heart of 
man. A rare experience." — Crowther, N. Y. 
Times. A fragile study of the obtuseness of 
love and blendness of lovers." — Newsweek 
Mag. 

8:00 p.m. Duke Regional Assembly, General Ses- 
sion. Music Room, East Duke Building. 
Speaker: Professor C. B. Hoover. 

8:15 p.m. Nereidian Club Show: "Timesweep. " 
East Campus Pool. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Friday, 6:15 P.M., Supper, followed by installation 
of the new B.S.U. Executive Council. Saturday and 
Sunday, March 14-15, Camp New Hope. Spring 
Planning Retreat. Dr. W. D. White will be the guest 
speaker. Rides will leave the circles on Saturday at 
1:30 P.M., returning to campus Sunday by 3:00 
P.M. Cost— $3.50. Register at the Center. All in- 
terested persons are invited. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9:30 A.M., Holy Communion; 7:15 P.M., 
Lenten Ecumenical Forums. Tuesday, 5 :15 P.M., 
Inquirer's Class. Wednesday, 7:10 A.M. and 5:30 
P.M., Holy Communion. Friday, 3 :15 P.M., Seminar 
on Orthodoxy. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R. Patton) : Sunday, 7:15 P.M., Forum at 
Episcopal Center. Monday, 5 :30 P.M., Men 's Gradu- 
ate Center, Supper meeting, to be followed by a dis- 
cussion of Honest to God by J. A. T. Robinson. 
Wednesday, 6:30 P.M., East Duke Chapel, Com- 
munion service. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll: 
Cranford Johnson, Assistant Chaplain) : Sunday, 9 :00 
A.M., Seminar: Honest to God; light breakfast and 
discussion. 5 .-30 P.M., Common Meal and Holy Com- 
munion. The Nominating Committee for new Council 
members will make its report and nominations will 
be received from the floor. Thursday, 5 :30 P.M., 
Men's Graduate Center, Social Legislation Seminar. 
The topic this week is " Urbanization : Problems and 



I 2 



Solutions." Bring your tray to the small dining- 
room. 

A Seminar on Medical ethics for nursing and 
medical students is scheduled to begin on Thursday, 
March 12, at 7:00 P.M., in the Hanes House Ree 
Room. There will be five sessions meeting on alter- 
nate Thursdays. The seminar will be led by Dr. 
Harmon Smith, Assistant Professor of Christian 
Ethics of the Divinity School. Topics to be dealt 
with include "The Patient's Right to Know the 
Truth," "Abortion," "Contraception," "Eutha- 
nasia," and "Artificial Insemination." All medical 
and nursing students are invited to participate. 

The Methodist Center announces its Atlanta 
Seminar. On April 1-5 (Wed.-Sun.), the last five 
days of spring vacation, members of the seminar will 
be in Atlanta considering the theme "The Church 
and Social Change in a Southern City. ' ' The seminar 
will especially concern itself with how the church is 
acting and/or reacting toward the problems of 
urbanization. The cost will be $30 which includes 
return transportation and tickets to two plays. Those 
who are interested will please contact Cranford John- 
son or Jack Carroll at 286-9230. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Saturday and Sunday, March 7-8, Synod 
Conference at Camp New Hope. Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., 
Interdenominational Fellowship Supper. Afterwards 
attend Forum at Episcopal Center. Friday, 7:00 
P.M., Worship Seminar. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5:30 P.M., at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. John Pendergrass, 3719 Chapel 
Hill Road. After supper and a short business meet- 
ing, the group will go to the Episcopal Center for 
the Forum. Transportation leaves the Chapel steps, 
East Campus circle and Hanes House at 5 :15 P.M. 
Tuesday, 12:40 P.M., Luncheon at Gilbert-Addoms 
Dining Hall. 



THE UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to 
the University, will deliver the sermon at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, 
March 8th, in the LTniversity Chapel. 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, March 15th is Dr. Stuart C. Henry, Associ- 
ate Professor of American Christianity, The Divinity 
School. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
STUDENT RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a student 
recital on Sunday, March 8th at 4:00 p.m. in the 
Music Room, East Duke Building. The University 
Community and the general public are cordially in- 
vited to attend. The program will be as follows : 



fionata for Trombone and Piano 
Allegro 
Andante 
Allegro moderato 

Ben Peek, Trombone 
John Euggero, Piano 



E. B. Trevarthen 



Prelude and Fugue in C-Sharp Minor, W. T. C. 1 

John Holt, Piano 
Concerto in B Minor 

Linda Speck, Viola 
Barbara Shepherd, Piano 
Aria from ' ' The Birthday Cantata ' ' 
Let Me Wander Not Unseen from ' ' L 'Allegro ' ' 
Let the Merry Bells Ring from ' ' L 'Allegro ' ' 

James Bivera and Carol Papps, Recorders 
Nancy Temple and Ruth Friedberg, Piano 
Che faro from "Orfeo" 
Non so pui from ' ' Le Nozze di Figaro ' ' 

Sally Blackwell, Mezzo-soprano 
Ruth Friedberg, Piano 
Sonata in E-Flat 

First movement: Allegro 

Barbara Watson, Piano 
Les Roses d 'Ispahan 
Micaela 's Aria from ' ' Carmen ' ' 

Karen Lundry, Soprano 
Ruth Friedberg, Piano 
Intermezzo in A, Opus 118, No. 2 

Billie Godwin, Piano 
Mi Chiamano Mimi from "La Boheme" 
Gretchen am Spinnrade 

Majorie Randolph, Soprano 
Ruth Friedberg, Piano 



Bach 
Handel 



Bach 
Handel 
Handel 



Gluck 
Mozart 



Haydn 



Faure 
Bizet 



Brahms 

Puccini 
Schubert 



CAMPUS CHRISTIAN CENTERS 
LENTEN SERVICES 

On each of the Sunday nights in Lent, the Campus 
Christian Centers are presenting a series of forums. 
The theme of this series is: "For the Life of the 
World," A Study of God's Affirmation of Human 
Existence. The sessions are being held at the Episco- 
pal Student Center each Sunday night at 7 :15 p.m. 
The nightly presentations will be followed by dis- 
cussion. The three remaining topics are : 

"The Incarnation and the Church: The Com- 
munity Gathered for the Life of the World" 

"The Incarnation and Existence: The Christian's 
Understanding of Himself" 

"The Incarnation and Existence: The Christian 
in the University" 

The University Community is cordially invited to 
participate in these forums. 

ZOOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, March 9th, in the auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Dr. 
Howard B. Haines, Department of Zoology, will speak 
on ' ' Diabetes in the Sand Rat. ' ' Coffee and tea will 
be served in the foyer at 4 :00. 



POLANYI LECTURE 

The last lecture in the series of five major lectures 
by Professor Michael Polanyi will be given on Mon- 
day evening, March 9th, at 7 :30 p.m. in the Music 
Room, East Duke Building. Professor Polanyi is in 
residence during the current semester as James B. 
Duke distinguished professor in the Department of 
Religion; he is widely regarded as one of the most 
distinguished living philosophers of the western world. 
Trained in the field of medicine, he has been Professor 
of Physical Chemistry in England and subsequently 
has held distinguished posts at Princeton, University 
of Chicago, and at Stanford's Institute of Advanced 
Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. The usual Tues- 
day seminar will follow on March 10th at 3 :30 p.m. 
in Room 208 Flowers Building. 



rsi 



CAMPUS CLUB TEA 

The Campus Club will meet for tea on Tuesday, 
March 10th at 3 :00 p.m. at the home of Mrs. Douglas 
M. Knight, 2138 Campus Drive. A creative hobby 
display will be the special feature of this event and 
will include such categories as Baking: Mrs. Irving 
Gray; Jewelry: Mrs. S. C. Harward; Pine Needle 
Craft: Mrs. S. R. Hauser; Painting: Mrs. Robert 
Rogers; Hooked Rugs: Mrs. E. C. Bolmier; Knitting: 
Mrs. Paul Welsh; Crewel Embroidery: Mrs. George 
Glockler; Metal Craft: Mrs. H. J. Oosting; Pansy 
Culture : Mrs. Ralph Earle. The Departments of Law, 
Mathematics and Physics will serve as hostesses. 
Mrs. T. M. Gallie, Jr. is General Hostess Chairman 
and Mrs. Kenneth Cuyler is Program Chairman. 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 

The Duke Mathematics Department will hold a 
seminar on Tuesday, March 10th at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 
114 Physics Building. Mr. Merrell L. Patrick, Car- 
negie Institute of Technology, will speak on "Some 
Inequalities for Jacobi Polynomials." 

Coffee will be served at 3:30 p.m. in Room 120 
Physics. 

DUKE SAILING CLUB INSTRUCTION 

Instruction in sailing for beginners and inter- 
mediates is available on Tuesday, March 10th in Room 
101 West Duke Building at 7:00 p.m. under the 
sponsorship of the Duke Sailing Club. Anyone 
interested is welcome to attend. 



JOINT DUKE-UNC PHILOSOPHY 
COLLOQUIUM 

A Joint Duke-UNC Philosophy Colloquium will 
be held in Room 213 Caldwell Hall at the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on Tuesday, March 
10th at 8 :00 p.m. Dr. David S. Shwayder, Visiting 
Associate Professor from the University of California 
at Berkeley will speak on the subject: "On Defining 
Language." All members of the University Com- 
munity are cordially invited. 

STUDENT UNION PRESENTS 
PRE-ARTISTS SERIES SEMINAR 

Following the pattern of holding a seminar on the 
particular art form and program being performed 
for the Artists Series, the Student Union's Fine Arts 
Committee will present J. Donald McLaughlin, senior 
Medical student and classical guitarist, in a seminar 
during the hour prior to the concert on Tuesday, 
March 10th in Room 208 Flowers Building. These 
seminars, from 7 :00 until 8 :00 p.m., are open to the 
public without charge and have been found to be 
especially helpful in increasing the enjoyment of the 
concerts. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
EXLIBRIS SOCIETY MEETING 

The Exlibris Society, Book Collectors and Book 
Lovers at Duke University, will meet on Monday, 
March 16th, at 7 :30 p.m., in the Pine Room. Sehrafft 's 
Country Inn, on the Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd. 
Richard L. Pearse, M.D., will speak on "Horse and 
Sabre — 300 Years of Books on Cavalry. ' ' 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LIBRARY LECTURE 

Dr. G. Henton Davies, Principal of Regent's Park 
College, Oxford, England, will deliver the Library 
Lecture on Wednesday, March 11th in York Chapel 
at 11:00 a.m. Dr. Davies' subject will be "Amos 
and Jerusalem." The public is cordially invited. 

PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

A Psychology Colloquium will be held on Wednes- 
day, March 11th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 130, Old 
Biology Building. Dr. Herbert S. Terrace of Colum- 
bia University will discuss the methods he has de- 
veloped for producing the errorless learning of fine 
discriminations in animals. The public is cordially 
invited to attend. 



ARTISTS SERIES: PRESTI AND LAGOYA, 
GUITAR DUO 

The Duke University Artists Series will present 
Presti and Lagoya, duo-guitarists, Tuesday, March 
10th at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Ida Presti 
and Alexandre Lagoya had both established them- 
selves as solo concert artists of considerable distinc- 
tion when, in 1955 they joined forces to form a 
guitar-duo. In the years since, Presti-Lagoya have 
won critical praise and fervent audience acclaim in 
Europe, North Africa, India and Australia. In their 
unique and fascinating programs Presti and Lagoya 
combine original works for guitar-duo with superb 
transcriptions ranging from Bach and Scarlatti to 
Albeniz and Debussy. Tickets priced at $2.00 are 
available in 202A Flowers Building, or call extension 
2911 for reservations. 

I 
Divertissement No. 1 F. Sor 

a) Introduction 

b) Theme Varie et Final 

* Andante Variee L. Van Beeilioven 

*Concerto in D Major Vivaldi-Bach 

Allegro 
Larghetto 
Allegrissimo 
*Chaeonne in G Major G. F. Handel 

INTERMISSION 
II 
**Serenade pour Deux Guitars Andre Jolivet 

a) Prelude et Canzona (Italie) 

b) Allegro Trepidante (Espagne) 
e) Andante Malineonico (France) 
d) Con Allegria (Amerique) 

**Sonatina Canonica M. Castelniiovo-Tedesco 

st) Mosso et Grazioso 

b) Sicilienne 

c) Fandang en Rondo 

*Danse No. 2 E. Granados 

*Aragonesa M. de Falla 

* Transcription by A. Lagoya 

**Dedieated to Duo Presti-Lagoya 

BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
March 11th at 4:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Stewart Nielsen, 
Department of Microbiology will speak on "Viru- 
lence — Lipid — Dimorphism Relationships in Histo- 
plasma Capsulatum." 

Dr. Nielsen is at Duke as a post-doctoral NSF 
fellow from Ohio State. Before receiving his Ph.D. 
in 1964. he obtained both his B.S. and M.S. degrees 
from Brigham Young University. Industrial and 
medical mycology are his main interests, though he 



r 4 1 



has worked with fleshy fungi under Alexander Smith 
at Michigan and served as a rnycological consultant 
in the Ohio State Allergy Laboratory. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 

ENGINEERING REVIEW LECTURES 

Pi Tau Sigma, mechanical engineering national 
honor society, presents the fourth in a series of 
review lectures on Wednesday, March 11th at 7 :00 
p.m. in Room 139, Engineering Building. Mr. F. C. 
Sheppard will speak on the topic, "Statics — 
Strength." The lectures review engineering funda- 
mentals for those persons preparing for the Engi- 
neer-in-Training examination to be given in May by 
the State of North Carolina. Review lectures are 
scheduled on successive Wednesday nights at 7 :00 
p.m. in the Engineering Auditorium and are open to 
the public. 

ENGINEERING LECTURE 

The Department of Engineering presents another 
in its "Guest Speakers Program" on Thursday, 
March 12th at 11:30 a.m. in Room 125 Engineering 
Building. Mr. P. D. Rosi, Associate Laboratory 
Director, RCA Laboratories, David Sarnoff Research 
Center, Princeton, New Jersey, will speak on "Direct 
Energy Conversion by Thermoelectric, Thermionic, 
and Photovoltaic Techniques." The public is cor- 
dially invited to attend. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 
The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, March 12th at 4 :00 p.m. in Room M-204 
Davison Building. Dr. Rubin Bressler, Department 
of Medicine, will speak on "The Role of Carnitine in 
Fatty Acid Transport. ' ' 

NEREIDIAN CLUB SHOW 

The Nereidian Club Show will be held on the 
evenings of Thursday, March 12th and Saturday, 
March 14th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Campus Pool. 
The theme for the show is "Timesweep," depicting 
the major periods in American history. Free tickets 
will be available at the Woman's College Gym office. 
The public is cordially invited to attend. 

CHEMISTRY SEMINAR 
The Department of Chemistry will hold a seminar 
on Friday, March 13th in Room fll of the Chemistry 
Building at 4:00 p.m. Dr. D. S. Breslow, Research 
Associate; Central Research Division. Hercules 
Powder Company, will speak on "The Chemistry of 
Nitrenes. " All interested persons are cordially in- 
vited to attend. 



DUKE REGIONAL ASSEMBLY 
Duke University, in cooperation with the Ameri- 
can Assembly, will hold a Regional Assembly on 
campus, March 12th through 15th. Some seventy 
participants in panel and general sessions will meet 
for three and a half days to discuss the topic, "Cultur- 
al Affairs and Foreign Relations." The Saturday 
evening general session to be held at 8:00 p.m. in 
the Music Room of East Duke Building, will be open 



to the public. At that session, Professor C. B. Hoover, 
James B. Duke Professor of Economies, will speak 
on "Problems in the Continuance of United States 
Economic Aid to Underdeveloped Countries." 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 
MARCH MEETING: CANCELLED 

The March 12th meeting of the Undergraduate 
Faculty Council has been cancelled. The next 
meeting is scheduled for Thursday, April 9th. 



DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CONCERT 
LOREN WITHERS, SOLOIST 

The Department of Music will present a concert 
by the Duke Symphony Orchestra, Allan Bone, 
conductor, on Thursday, March 12th at 8:15 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. A reception will be held in 
Flowers Lounge immediately following the program. 
Featured will be Loren Withers of the Duke Depart- 
ment of Music as piano soloist. Also programmed 
are two works by Duke alumni, Phillip Rhodes, '62 
and Richard Trevarthen, '55. Mr. Rhodes studied 
Theory and Composition under William Klenz of the 
Duke Music Department and Iain Hamilton, Mary 
Duke Biddle Professor of Music. His "Four Move- 
ments for Chamber Orchestra" was written at Tangle- 
wood in the summer of 1962, where it received the 
Raphael Sagalyn Award. He is currently pursuing 
the Master's degree in Theory at Yale University. 
Mr. Trevarthen is also a former student of William 
Klenz. Upon completion of the Master's degree 
in Theory at the University of Michigan he taught for 
six years on the faculty of Western Carolina Col- 
lege, Cullowhee, North Carolina. Mr. Trevarthen 
is currently a Visiting Lecturer at Duke University 
and has studied Composition with Mr. Hamilton. 
Admission will be $1.00 at the door ; advance sale 
$.50 in Room 106 Asbury Building. The program 
will be as follows : 

Polka and Fugue from "Schwanda" Weinberger 

Four Movements for Chamber Orchestra (1962) 

Phillip Rhodes 
(Class of 1962) 
Serenade in Five Movements for Orchestra (1963) 

Richard Trevarthen 
(Visiting Lecturer 1963-64) 
Intermission 
Concerto No. 2 in B-flat Major for 

Piano and Orchestra, Opus 83 Brahms 

Allegro non troppe 
Allegro appassionato 
Andante 

(Barbara Pepper, Solo 'Cellist) 
Allegretto grazioso 

Mr. Withers 



ART EXHIBITIONS 

West Gallery — "Modern Religious Prints" 
The Student Union's Fine Arts Committee an- 
nounces the opening of a distinguished exhibition, 
"Modern Religious Prints," now on display in the 
Alumni Lnunsre of West Union Buildinsr. It may be 
seen without charge until the 22nd of March. 

An exhibition of 48 prints by 32 artists and 
selected by Miss Elaine L. Johnson. Assistant Curator 
of Drawings and Prints at the Museum of Modern 
Art, New York; the exhibition was organized for 



m 



circulation by the Museum's Department of Circulat- 
ing Exhibitions. All but two loans are from the 
Museum Collection. 

Prints in the exhibition range in date from Bres- 
din's Good Samaritan of 1861 to Watanabe's People 
Visiting the Stable of 1962. The hundred years 
spanned by the prints begins with the height of na- 
turalism and continues through such movements as 
impressionism, surrealism, and abstract expressionism. 
Included are wood-cuts, etchings, lithographs, and 
stencils. 



STUDENT RECITAL 
VIOLIN AND CHAMBER MUSIC 
The Department of Music will present a recital 
of violin and chamber music performed by the stu- 
dents of Joseph Pepper on Friday, March 13th at 
8:15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. 
The University Community and the general public 
are cordially invited to attend. The program will be 
as follows : 

Concerto for Two Violins in A Minor Vivaldi 

First movement — Allegro moderate 

Kaye Franklin 

Dorothy Barker 

accompanied by Barbara Watson 

Sonatina in D Schubert 

First movement — Allegro molto 

Dorothy Barker 

accompanied by Bonnie Brueggemann 

Air Variees, No. 1 and 2 Dancla 

Marrianne Turner 

accompanied by Bonnie Brueggemann 

Concerto in E Major Bach 

First movement — Allegro 

Sue Green 
accompanied by Barbara Watson 
Sonata, Opus 12, No. 1 in D Beethoven 

First movement — Allegro con brio 
Thomas Lowe 
Bonnie Brueggemann 
Concerto in A minor de Beriot 

First movement — Allegro con brio 
Faye Franklin 
accompanied by Barbara Watson 
String Quartet. Odus 54, No. 1 Haydn 

Allegro con brio 
Allegretto 
Menuetto 
Finale 

Sue Green, first violin 

Dorothv Barker, second violin 

Linda Sneck, viola 

Donald Young, 'cellist 



EAST GALLERY ART EXHIBIT 

"Works by Edith London 

The Gallery in the East Campus Library will house 
an exhibition of recent works by Edith London dur- 
ing the month of March. Mrs. London, who came to 
Duke in 1939 when her husband, the late Dr. Fritz 
London joined the University's Physics Department, 
is known throughout the area as an artist of un- 
common ability. She has studied in her native Berlin 
and in Paris with the internationally esteemed artists, 
Marcel Gromaire and Andre Lhote. However, her 
art owes much to her own sensitive and thoughtful 
nature and to many years of perceptive seeing. Al- 
though her work is distinguished by its delicacy of 
color and texture, one cannot overlook the intellectual 



discipline of composition and form that underlies the 
more sensuous aspect of her style. 

The exhibition is composed of 27 items of which 15 
are oils, 6, pen and ink drawings ; and 6, collages. 
Several private collectors have loaned works for the 
exhibition, and the North Carolina Museum of Art has 
generously sent two of Mrs. London's works from its 
collections. The inclusion of several earlier paintings 
allows one to see the evolution of Mrs. London's style 
to the complete abstraction evident in her most recent 
canvases. Certainly, her increasing use of the medium 
of collage stands as a contributing factor to her 
current investigation of the evocative and associative 
qualities of color, form, and texture, unconfined by the 
limitations of recognizable subject matter. Her works 
invite long and increasingly enriching contemplation. 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office. 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows : 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC— Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 



THE HARLEY AFRICAN COLLECTION 
The George W. Harley African Collection is now 
on display on the second floor of the Psychology- 
Soeiologv Building (Old Biology') outside the Depart- 
ment of Sociology and Anthropology. Dr. Harley is 
a distinguished alumnus, formerly assistant curator 
of the Biology Museum at old Trinity College, and 
later curator of the Pathology Museum at the Yale 
Medical School. Much of his collection of African 
masks is in the Peabody Museum at Harvard, where 
he did post-graduate work. After a number of years 
of medical work in "West Africa, Dr. Harley began 
for President Tubman the government museum of 
ethnology and history in Liberia. The exhibit will be 
on display during the spring semester. 



TRIANGLE PLAYERS 
ORIGINAL PLAYS 

The Triangle Players will present another new 
short play, "The "Wise and Foolish Virgin." Sun- 
day, March 8th, Wednesday, March 11th and Sun- 
day, March 15th at the Triangle Coffee House, 1205 
Duke University Road, at 9 :30 p.m. each evening. 
The original play by Tom Benenson of Chapel Hill 
will be directed by Tommy Thompson. It is de- 
scribed as "a situation comedy at its sophisticated 
best." Durham-Chapel Hill actors compose the east. 



WEEK OF 



Mar. 15-21, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Mar. 15-21, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, March 15 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Stuart C. Henry, Associate Professor of Ameri- 
can Christianity, The Divinity School. Sermon : 
"Self Remembered." Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union Chess Club. Room 

204 Flowers Building. 
4:00 p.m. Concert: "A Festival of Jewish Music." 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

Monday, March 16 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium of Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Helen V. 
Crouse. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. Ex Libris Society Meeting. Schrafft's 
Country Inn, Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard. 

8:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Jack P. 
Hailman for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology. Room 
225 Biological Sciences Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, March 17 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. Orval S. Wintermute. 
12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Room 114 

Physics Building. Speaker : Professor William 

E. Jenner. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Duke Sailing Club Meeting. Speaker: 

Mr. Milt Ricketts. Room 101 West Duke 

Building. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 

Floor, Card Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Josiah C. Trent Society Meeting. The 

Colonial Room, Schrafft's Country Inn. 

Speaker: Mr. N. Philip Strause, III. 
8:15 p.m. Terpsichorean Concert. Woman's College 

Auditorium. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Madrigal Singers Spring Program 

Honoring Shakespeare's Anniversary. Music 

Room, East Duke Building. 

Wednesday, March 18 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Orval S. Wintermute. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



2:15 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Elmer P. 
Litzinger for the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry. 
Room 303 Chemistry Building-. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Badminton Open House. Woman's 
College Gymnasium. Open to all faculty, staff, 
and students. 

7:30 p.m. Delta Phi Alpha, German Honorary 
Meeting. Room 014 Language Building. 
Speaker: Consul-General Dr. Horst von Rom, 
Federal Republic of Germany. 

7:00 and 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Long Day's Journey Into 
Night" by Eugene O 'Neill with Katharine Hep- 
burn, Ralph Richardson, Jason Robards, Jr., 
and Dean Stockwell. All four of cast received 
"Best Acting Awards" Cannes Film Festival. 
"One of the 10 best films of the year!"— 
Crowther, N. Y. Times; Weiler, N. Y. Times; 
Cook, N. Y. World Tel. & Sun. 

8:15 p.m. Terpsichorean Concert. Woman's Col- 
lege Auditorium. 



Thursday, March 19 

Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarship Program 

(See special notice). 
10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Mr. M. Elton Hendricks. 
12:30 p.m. Newcomers' Club Guest Luncheon. 

Sehrafft's Country Inn. 
4:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 

Room M-204 Davison Building. Speaker: Dr. 

Bernard F. Belleau. 
4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 125 

Engineering Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 
Card Gymnasium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Series: 
Dr. Harold Taylor. Page Auditorium. 



Friday, March 20 

10:10 a.m. Presentation of "The Passion According 
to St. Matthew" by deVictoria. The Divinity 
School Choir. York Chapel, Divinity School. 



2:00-10:00 p.m. 32nd Annual Engineers Show. 

Engineering Building. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 

Room 208 Asbury Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim ; those 12 

and under must be accompanied by their 

mothers. 
7:00 p.m. Student Union Pre-Artists Series Seminar. 

208 Flowers Building. Speaker: Professor 

Paul Bryan. 
7:30 p.m. Bowling for faculty members and families 

at Sportland. Regular rates apply. 
8:15 p.m. Artists Series: Pittsburgh Symphony 

Orchestra. Page Auditorium. 

Saturday, March 21 

2:00-10:00 p.m. 32nd Annual Engineer's Show. 
Engineering Building. 

7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Long Day's Journey Into 
Night" by Eugene O'Neill with Katharine Hep- 
burn, Ralph Richardson, Jason Robards, Jr., 
and Dean Stockwell. All four of cast received 
"Best Acting Awards" Cannes Film Festival. 
"One of the 10 best films of the year!"— 
Crowther, N. Y. Times; Weiler, N. Y. Times; 
Cook, N. Y. World Tel. & Sun. 

8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society: Fine Arts Quartet. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Thursday, Lunch, followed by: Dr. Michael Polanyi, 
James B. Duke Distinguished Professor in the De- 
partment of Religion, speaking on the topic, "Faith 
and Reason" — Sponsored by the Campus Christian 
Centers. Register for the luncheon bv Tuesday at 
5 :00 P.M. by calling the Chapel office, extension 2921. 
Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Supper, followed by Worship and 
Seminars. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 
EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9:30 A.M., Holy Communion; 7:15 P.M., 
Lenten Ecumenical Forum. Tuesday, 5 :15 P.M., In- 
quirer's Class. Wednesday, 7:10 A.M., Holy Com- 
munion. Thursday, 5 .-30 P.M., Holv Communion. 
Friday, 7:10 A.M., Holy Communion; 4:00 P.M., 
Seminar on Christianity and Modern Man. 

Voting for elected members of the Episcopal Uni- 
versity Center Council will be held on Sunday, March 
22, following the 9 :30 service. 

Please note the shift of the mid-week service from 
Wednesday to Thursday. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R. Patton) : Sunday, 7:15 P.M., Forum at 
Episcopal Center. Tuesday, 5 :30 P.M.. Men's Gradu- 
ate Center, Supper, followed bv discussion of Honest 
to God. 



[2] 



METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, 9:00 
A.M., Seminar — Honest to God; Light breakfast 
preceding the discussion. 6 .-00 P.M., Evening Prayer. 
The Methodist Lenten Atlanta Seminar on "The 
Church and Social Change in a Southern City" will 
be held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 1-5 (Wednes- 
day-Sunday). The Seminar will be concerned to 
understand the major areas of social problems and 
change in Atlanta and to find out how the Church is 
acting or not acting in relation to these problems. 
The cost of the Seminar is $30.00, which includes 
room, breakfast, three play tickets, and return trans- 
portation. Any person interested should contact 
Cranford Johnson or Jack Carroll at the Center (286- 
9230) immediately. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson): Sunday, 5:30 P.M., Interdenominational 
Supper and Vesper Service at Westminster House, 
followed by program at Episcopal Center. Friday, 
7 :00 P.M., Worship Seminar at Westminster House. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5:30 P.M., home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Richard Grant, 2509 Wrightwood 
Avenue. After supper, Dr. Grant will speak on, 
"The Christian Concept of Romantic Love." Trans- 
portation leaves the Chapel steps, East Campus circle 
and Hanes House at 5:15 P.M. Thursday, 12:40 
P.M., Luncheon at Gilbert-Addoms Dining Hall on 
East. 



THE UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Stuart C. Henry, Associate 
Professor of American Christianity, The Divinity 
School, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, March 
15th, in the University Chapel. His subject will be 
"Self Remembered." The order of worship follows: 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, Palm Sunday, March 22nd, is the Reverend 
Dr. George MacLeod, Founder and Director, Iona 
Community, Scotland. 



A FESTIVAL OF JEWISH MUSIC 

The Judea Reform Congregation presents in con- 
junction with National Jewish Music Month, "A 
Festival of Jewish Music," to be held at 4:00 p.m., 
Sunday, March 15th in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. Featured will be works by Bloch, Ravel, 
Ben Hanim, Diamond, and Partos, played by out- 
standing local musicians : Julia Mueller, violist ; John 
Hanks, tenor; Ruth Friedberg, pianist; Isabel Sam- 
field, soprano ; Peter Hellman, flutist ; and Frank 
Bennett, percussionist. There will be no admission 
charge for the program, and the public is cordially 
invited. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, March 16th in the Auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Dr. 
Helen V. Crouse, Department of Botany, Columbia 
University, will speak on "Novel Chromosomal Be- 



havior as Exemplified by the Developmental Cytology 
of Sciara. ' ' Coffee and tea wil be served in the foyer 
at 4 :00. 



EX LIBRIS SOCIETY MEETING 

The Ex Libris Society — Book Collectors and Book- 
lovers of Duke University — will meet on Monday, 
March 16th at 7 :30 p.m. in the Pine Room, Schrafft's 
Country Inn on the Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard. 
Richard L. Pearse, MD will speak on the topic, 
' ' Horse and Sabre — 300 Years of Books on Cavalry. ' ' 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Jack P. Hailman for 
the Ph.D. degree in Zoology will be held on Monday, 
March 16th at 8:00 p.m. in Room 225 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Hailman 's 
dissertation is ' ' The Ontogeny of An Instinct. ' ' The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors P. H. Klopfer, K. Schmidt-Nielsen, J. R. 
Gregg, N. Guttman, minor; D. Adams, minor. Pro- 
fessor Klopfer will preside. 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 

On Tuesday, March 17th, at 4 :00 p.m., Professor 
William E. Jenner of the University of North Caro- 
lina will give a lecture entitled "A New Look at 
Elliptic Functions," in Room 114 Physics Building. 
Coffee will be served at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 120 
Physics Building. 



JOSIAH C. TRENT SOCIETY LECTURE 

The Josiah C. Trent Society for the History of 
Medicine will meet at Schrafft's Country Inn, the 
Colonial Room, on Tuesday, March 17th at 8 :00 p.m. 
Mr. N. Philip Strause III will address the Society on 
"Medicine of the Ancient Maya." The talk will be 
followed by the sale at auction of a small number of 
old medical books. 



TERPSICHOREAN CONCERT 

Terpsichorean, the modern dance club, will present 
its annual Spring Concert on Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, March 17th and 18th at 8:15 p.m. in the 
Woman's College Auditorium. The program will 
feature dance-readings from the works by contempo- 
rary writers: Archibald Macleish, E. E. Cummings, 
and Jean Paul Sartre. Also included in the program 
will be dances to North Carolina folk songs in "Lost 
Cove Colony, North Carolina," variations on the 
theme of "The Modern Arts and Dance," and ex- 
change dances from the North Carolina College Dance 
Group. No admission will be charged, and the Duke 
University Community and the general public is 
cordially invited to attend. 



DUKE MADRIGAL SINGERS 
IN SHAKESPEARE PROGRAM 

The Department of Music announces a spring pro- 
gram of music to honor the four-hundredth anni- 
versary of Shakespeare's birth to be presented by the 
Duke Madrigal Singers on Tuesday, March 17th at 
8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. 



m 



Consisting principally of tests and settings from the 
time of the bard, the program will contain madrigals, 
ballets, music for recorders, canzonets and rounds. 
Nancy Temple, soprano, and Ronald Steed, baritone, 
will sing ayres to the harpsichord. Music of such 
Elizabethan masters as Morley, Byrd, Gibbons, 
Weelkes, Ravenscroft, Tomkins, Bennett, Campian 
and Wilbye will be performed by the fifteen mixed 
voices singing both as a group and in smaller en- 
sembles as well. The program will be directed by 
Eugenia Saville, Associate Professor in the Music De- 
partment. The accompanist will be Frank Jordan. 
The program is open to the public without charge, and 
the University Community and general public are cor- 
dially invited to attend. The program will be as 
follows : 



Thomas Morley 

Morley 

Luca Marenzio 

William Byrd 



Morley 
Thomas Campian 

Morley 



Thomas Morley 



madrigals and ballets 
About the maypole 

(verses ascribed to Michael Drayton) 
Say, gentle nymph 
Spring returns 

This sweet and merry month of May 
(verses ascribed to Thomas Watson) 
ayres, soprano with harpsichord 
It was a lover and his lass 
The cypress curtain of the night 

(poem by the composer) 
Will ye buy a fine dog? 

(verses by Sir John Hoskins) 

Nancy Temple 
music for recorders 
Shepherd's pipe 

May Bates, Carol Papps 
madrigals, ensemble 

Ah, dear heart Orlando Gibbons 

(poem by John Donne) 
Lady, your eye my love enforced Thomas Weelkes 

The silver swan Gibbons 

Alice Williams, Ann Cartwright, Polly Bower, 
Frank Bennett, Don Bell, Michael Menne, Eon Steed 
canzonets to two voices 
I go before, my darling 

In nets of golden wires Morley 

May Bates, Ann Cartwright 
songs, baritone with harpsichord 

When icicles hang by the wall Ralph Vaughan-Williams 

Orpheus with his lute Ralph Vaughan-Williams 

(texts by Shakespeare) 

Ron Steed 
rounds 

New oysters! Thomas Ravenscroft 

Hey boy ho boy, news! Anonymous 

Hey, ho, to the greenwood now let us go William Byrd 

Sumer is icumen in Anonymous 

madrigals 

Oyez! has any found a lad? Thomas Tomkins 

Weep, O mine eyes John Bennett 

Sweet honey-sucking bees John Wilbye 

All creatures now are merry-minded Bennett 

(from "The Triumphs of Oriana") 

The Duke Madrigal Singers 

Roster, Spring 1964 

Sopranos : May Bates, Ann Cartwright, Nancy Temple, Alice 

Williams 
Altos: Polly Bower, Emily Hespenheide, Mardi Jacobsen 
Tenors: Don Bell, Frank Bennett, Thad Dankel, Frank Glass 
Basses: Jerry Johnson, Tom Lowe, Mike Menne, Ron Steed 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Elmer F. Litzinger 
for the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry will be held on 
Wednesday, March 18th at 2:15 p.m. in Room 303 
Chemistry Building. The subject of Mr. Litzinger 's 



dissertation is "The Synthesis of Some Indoloqui- 
nolizinium Salts. " The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors C. K. Bradsher, 
Pelham Wilder, C. R. Hauser, Frances Brown, and 
Robert W. Wheat, minor. Professor C. K. Bradsher 
will preside. 



NEWCOMERS' CLUB GUEST LUNCHEON 

The Newcomers' Club will hold a Guest Lunch- 
eon on Thursday, March 19th at 12:30 p.m. at 
Schrafft's Country Inn. Entertainment will be a 
fashion show sponsored by Joseph Bernard's. Mem- 
bers are urged to come and to bring a guest. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, March 19th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
M-204 Davison Building. Dr. Bernard F. Belleau, 
Professor of Biochemistry, University of Ottawa, 
Canada will speak on "The Pharmacological Plural- 
ity vs. the Chemical Singleness of Adrenergic Re- 
ceptors. ' ' 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

Because of the Spring Recess, the Academic Coun- 
cil will meet one week early, on Thursday, March 
19th at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 125 Engineering Building. 
The Agenda will incude the following items: 

1. Action on the motion concerning the AAU 
Statement on Tenure which was held over from 
the February meeting. 

2. Discussion of certain non-faculty salaries at 
Duke, led by Dr. Henry Mcintosh, Dr. J. D. 
Johnston, Jr., and Dean H. W. Lewis. 

If unable to attend, members should give notice 
to the secretary at extension 2214. 



STUDENT UNION MAJOR SPEAKER SERIES 
DR. HAROLD TAYLOR 

The Student Union will present Dr. Harold Tay- 
lor as the fourth speaker in its Major Speakers Series 
on Thursday, March 19th, at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Audi- 
torium. Dr. Taylor's address on "The World of the 
American Student" is open to the public without 
charge. The finalists for the Angier B. Duke Me- 
morial Scholarships and their hosts will be the special 
guests of the evening and both they and the public 
are cordially invited to a reception following the 
address in Flowers Lounge. 

Dr. Taylor is one of America's most brilliant and 
progressive educators. As President of Sarah 
Lawrence College, he pioneered new scholastic meth- 
ods for fourteen years, and resigned only recently to 
devote himself entirely to teaching and writing. He 
has just completed a tour of Europe and Asia, under 
the sponsorship of the Ford Foundation, where he 
conferred with educators, artists, political leaders. 
and students about problems of modern society. 

Dr. Taylor is a dynamic and lucid spokesman for 
education. He has a profound understanding of the 
creative process, its significance in daily life, and its 
importance to the cultural problems of our time. 



[4] 



ANGIER B. DUKE 
FINALISTS MEETING 

The Seventeenth Annual Finalists Meeting for the 
Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarships available to 
students from North and South Carolina is being 
held on the campus on Thursday and Friday, March 
19th and 20th. Contestants for the Scholarships from 
the Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia 
Regions, will also be in attendance for the week-end. 

The contestants will take part in a program of 
seminars and interviews to determine the Scholarship 
winners. In addition to the program of selection, the 
contestants and their Duke student sponsors will be 
entertained at a luncheon and two dinners given in 
their honor. Both evening events scheduled for Page 
Auditorium are open to the public. The program 
is as follows: 

Thursday, March 19th 

Morning Period of informal visits to classes, laboratories, and 

tours of the campus. 
12:00 noon Contestants Luncheon: Private Dining Room, 2nd 

Floor, Union Building, East Campus. 
1:45 p.m. Faculty Seminars 
3:30 p.m. Student Union Seminar: Dr. Harold Taylor. 

Topic: "What is Culture?" Room 208 Flowers Build- 
ing. 
6 : 15 p.m. Banquet with Student Union as co-hosts with 

Angier B. Duke Scholarship Committee 
8 : 15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Address : Dr. 

Harold Taylor. Topic: "The World of the American 

Student. ' ' 
9:30 p.m. S. U. Reception. Flowers Lounge. 

Friday, March 20th 

Morning Individual Interviews with Faculty Judges. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Selection Committee Interviews 
6:15 p.m. Banquet. Union Ballroom 

8:15 p.m. Concert: Artists Series: Pittsburgh Symphony 
Orchestra, Special guests: Angier B. Duke Finalists, 
hosts and guests. 

Saturday, March 21st 

Finalists informed of scholarship selections at home by 
telegram. 



32ND ANNUAL ENGINEERS SHOW 

The College of Engineering will conduct its 32nd 
Annual Engineers Show on Friday and Saturday, 
March 20th and 21st at the Engineering Building 
on the West Campus from 2 :00 to 10 :00 p.m. on both 
days. There is no admission charge. 

The theme of this year's show is "Engineering 
Shapes Tomorrow," and will feature projects, demon- 
strations and exhibits in every aspect of modern 
engineering. It will attempt to present the many 
future technological problems that a practicing engi- 
neer might encounter, and show some of the means 
of meeting and solving those problems. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL CHOIR 
PRESENTS LENTEN SERVICE 

At a special Lenten service, the Divinity School 
Choir, under the direction of Professor John Hanks, 
will present "The Passion According to St. Matthew," 
by Thomas L. deVictoria, in York Chapel, The Di- 
vinity School, at 10:10 a.m., Friday, March 20th. 

Divinity School students taking solo parts are 
Thomas Danek, Charles Smith, W. C. Harris, Thomas 
Cassidy, Richard Heitzenrater, and Thomas Daily. 
Miss Helen Kendall is the Chapel organist. The Uni- 



versity Community and the general public are cor- 
dially invited. 



ARTISTS SERIES PRESENTS 
PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

The Duke University Artists Series will present 
the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in a concert in 
Page Auditorium on Friday, March 20th at 8 :15 p.m. 
Standing room only is available in 202A Flowers 
Building, (extension 2911) 

The Student Union will again hold a Pre- Artists, 
Series Seminar with Professor Paul Bryan, of the 
Department of Music, as speaker. The seminar is 
open to the public without charge in Room 208 
Flowers Building at 7 :00 p.m. immediately prior to 
the concert. 

Founded in 1895, the orchestra earned its fame 
under such conductors as Victor Herbert, Otto 
Klemperer, and Fritz Reiner. Under ; the .baton, ol., 
William Steinberg since 1952, the orchestra has 
grown to an exciting musical force whose reputation 
is now world-wide. Its concerts feature the great 
conductors and soloists of our time and the orches- 
tra 's recordings on Command Classics have been wide- 
ly acclaimed. 

PROGRAM 
SCHUBERT Overture to "Rosamunde" 

BRAHMS Symphony No. 4, in e minor, Opus 98 

Allegro non troppo 
Andante moderato 
Allegro giocoso 
Allegro energico e passionato 
INTERMISSION 
GUNTHER SCHULLER Seven Studies on Themes of 

Paul Klee 
Antique Harmonies 
Abstract Trio 
Little Blue Devil 
Twittering Machine 
Arab Village 
An Eerie Moment 
Pnstori 1ft 
RICHARD STRAUSS Salome 's Dance of the Seven Veils 

CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
FINE ARTS QUARTET 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the fifth 
concert of its season, to be played by the Fine Arts 
Quartet ("Artists-in Residence, The University of 
Wisconsin — Milwaukee") on Saturday, March 21st 
at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. 
The musicians are Leonard Sorkin and Abram Loft 
(Violins), Gerald Stanick (Viola) and George Sop- 
kin (Cello). The program follows: 

Prokofieff Quartet No. 1 in D major, Opus 50 

Mendelssohn Quartet in D major, Opus 44, No. 1 

Mozart Quartet in E flat major, K. 428 

Announcement is also made of the final concert of 
this season to be given Saturday, April 11th by the 
New York String Sextet. 
Admission : 

The annual membership card admits to all con- 
certs. A guest card for a single admission to any 
one concert costs $2.50. About 60 guest cards are 
available for each concert; they may be obtained at 
the Music Room door from 7 :30 to 8 ;00 p.m. on con- 
cert evenings. Inquiries may be addressed to Cham- 
ber Arts Society, c/o Ernest W. Nelsen, Box 6065, 
College Station. 



[5] 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows: 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: 1352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC — Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 



ART EXHIBITIONS 

"West Gallery — "Modern Religious Prints" 
The Student Union's Fine Arts Committee an- 
nounces the opening of a distinguished exhibition, 
"Modern Religious Prints," now on display in the 
Alumni Lounge of West Union Building. It may be 
seen without charge until the 22nd of March. 

An exhibition of 48 prints by 32 artists and 
selected by Miss Elaine L. Johnson, Assistant Curator 
of Drawings and Prints at the Museum of Modern 
Art, New York; the exhibition was organized for 
circulation by the Museum's Department of Circulat- 
ing Exhibitions. All but two loans are from the 
Museum Collection. 

Prints in the exhibition range in date from Bres- 
din's Good Samaritan of 1861 to Watauabe's People 
Visiting the Stable of 1962. The hundred years 
spanned by the prints begins with the height of na- 
turalism and continues through such movements as 
impressionism, surrealism, and abstract expressionism. 
Included are wood-cuts, etchings, lithographs, and 
stencils. 



EAST GALLERY ART EXHIBIT 

"Works by Edith London 

The Gallery in the East Campus Library will house 
an exhibition of recent works by Edith London dur- 
ing the month of March. Mrs. London, who came to 
Duke in 1939 when her husband, the late Dr. Fritz 
London joined the University's Physics Department, 
is known throughout the area as an artist of un- 
common ability. She has studied in her native Berlin 
and in Paris with the internationally esteemed artists, 
Marcel Gromaire and Andre Lhote. However, her 
art owes much to her own sensitive and thoughtful 
nature and to many years of perceptive seeing. Al- 
though her work is distinguished by its delicacy of 
color and texture, one cannot overlook the intellectual 
discipline of composition and form that underlies the 
more sensuous aspect of her style. 

The exhibition is composed of 27 items of which 15 
are oils, 6, pen and ink drawings; and 6, collages. 
Several private collectors have loaned works for the 



exhibition, and the North Carolina Museum of Art has 
generously sent two of Mrs. London's works from its 
collections. The inclusion of several earlier paintings 
allows one to see the evolution of Mrs. London 's style 
to the complete abstraction evident in her most recent 
canvases. Certainly, her increasing use of the medium 
of collage stands as a contributing factor to her 
current investigation of the evocative and associative 
qualities of color, form, and texture, unconfined by the 
limitations of recognizable subject matter. Her works 
invite long and increasingly enriching contemplation. 

FRIEDRICH HEBBEL EXHIBIT 

The Department of Germanic Languages in con- 
junction with the Department of English (Speech and 
Drama) announce a current exhibit on the life and 
work of the German dramatist aud poet Friedrich 
Hebbel (1813-1863) in the Current Periodical Room 
of the "Woman's College Library. The exhibit is on 
loan from the Grasses Haus, Municipal Theater, 
Frankfort, Germany, and will be on display from 
March 10th through March 31st. 



FACULTY CLUB LUNCHEON 
POSTPONED 

The Faculty Club Luncheon has been postponed 
to Wednesday, March 25th at 12:30 p.m. in the 
U/nion Ballroom. 



TRIANGLE PLAYERS 

The final performance of "The Wise and Foolish 
Virgin," by Tom Benenson, University of North 
Carolina, will be given Sunday, March 15th at 9 :30 
p.m. at the Triangle Coffee House, 1205 Duke Uni- 
versity Rd. 

ADVANCE NOTICE 
MUSIC FOR ORGAN AND STRINGS 

The Duke University Department of Music pre- 
sents Music for Organ and Strings, with Mildred L. 
Hendrix, Organist and Allan Bone, Conductor, on 
Palm Sunday, March 22nd at 4 :00 p.m. in the Duke 
University Chapel. The public is cordially invited to 
attend. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
PASSOVER OBSERVANCE 

Those desiring to join a Jewish family for the 
traditional Passover Sedar on Friday, March 27th 
or Saturday, March 28th, should call Mrs. Leon 
Dworsky at 681-6294 by Wednesday, March 18th. 
Services will be held at Beth-El Congregation (Watts 
St. and Markham Ave.) on March 27th at 6:30 p.m., 
on March 28th at 9:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m., and on 
March 29th at 9 :00 a.m. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE LECTURE 

The Department of Germanic Languages and the 
University's Program in Comparative Literature an- 
nounce a lecture on Monday, March 23rd at 4:00 p.m. 
in 208 Flowers Building. Professor Haskell M. Block, 
Professor of Comparative Literature at Brooklyn Col- 
lege, Brooklyn, New York, will speak on "The Im- 
pact of French Svmbolism on Modern American 
Poetry-." 



[6] 



WEEK OF 



Mar. 22-28, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Mar. 22-28, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, March 22 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. Palm Sunday. University Service of 
Worship. University Chapel. Preacher: The 
Reverend Dr. George F. MacLeod, Founder 
and Leader, The Iona Community, Scotland. 
Sermon: "The Kingship of Christ." Broad- 
cast over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC- 
FM. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union Chess Club. Room 

204 Flowers Building. 
4:00 p.m. Palm Sunday Concert: "Music for 
Organ and Strings." University Chapel. 

Monday, March 23 

12:00 noon Phj'siology and Pharmacology Seminar. 

Room M-20-1 Davison Building. Speaker : Dr. 

John Billingham. 
4:00 p.m. Economics Seminar. Room 101 Gray 

Building. Speaker : Professor Abba P. Lerner. 
4:00 p.m. Comparative Literature Lecture. Room 

208 Flowers Building. Speaker: Professor 

Haskell M. Block. 
4:00 p.m. Sanitary Engineering Lecture. Room 

125 Engineering Building. Speaker: Dr. 

Kenneth J. Ives. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. John S. 

Roberts. 



5:00 p.m. Faculty Club Volleyball Movies. Room 
104 Card Gymnasium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty,., staff members, a«,d students, , w ., : . 

5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



10:10 
11:30 

12:30- 
2:00 

3:30- 
4:15- 
5:00. 
5:45 
6:30 



Tuesday, March 24 

York Chapel. 



a.m. Divinity School Chapel 
Dr. Stuart C. Henry. 
a.m. Engineering Guest Speaker 
Auditorium, Engineering Building. 
Mr. R. S. Sherwood. 
1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate 
Volleyball, 
p.m. Committee on International 



Program. 
Speaker : 

Students 

Relations 

Lecture. 105 Carr Building. Speaker: Mr. 

K. G. V. Krishna. 
•5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 

p.m. International Club Meeting. . Men's 

Graduate Center, '^Speaker: Dr. Robert Crane. 

p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Initiation. Green Room, 

East Duke Building. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



7:30 p.m. Duke Outing Club Meeting for Monon- 

gahela National Forest Trip. Room 204 

Flowers Building. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 

Floor, Card Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Room 403, Dey 

Hall. University of North Carolina. Speaker: 

Professor Holger O. Nygard. 
8:00 p.m. Joint Duke-U.N.C. Physics Colloquium. 

Room 114 Physics Building. Speaker: Dr. 

Per-Olov Lowdin. 
8:15 p.m. Music Department "An Evening With 

Iain Hamilton." Music Room, East Duke 

Building. 

Wednesday, March 25 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. Stuart C. Henry. 
11:00 a.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 

Speaker : The Reverend John H. Crum. 
12:30 p.m. Faculty Club Luncheon. Union Ball- 
room. Speaker: Dr. Michael Polanyi. 

4:00 p.m. Engineering Faculty Council Meeting. 
Conference Room, Engineering Building. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Darell 
McCloud. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Badminton Open House. Woman's 
College Gymnasium. Open to all faculty, staff, 
and students. 

7:00 and 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Long Day's Journey Into 
Night" by Eugene O'Neill with Katharine 
Hepburn, Ralph Richardson, Jason Robards, 
Jr., and Dean Stockwell. All four of cast 
received "Best Acting Awards" Cannes Film 
Festival. "One of the 10 best fikns of the 
vear!"— Crowther, N. Y. Times; Weiler, N. Y. 
Times; Cook, N. Y. World Tel. & Sun. 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club 
Meeting. Green Room, East Duke Building. 

8:15 p.m. Forestry Lecture. Biological Sciences 
Building Auditorium. Speaker: Dr. G. L. 
Barger. 

Thursday, March 26 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Holy Communion. Dr. Stuart C. Henry, 

Celebrant. 
12:30 p.m. Spring Recess Begins. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Miss Betty 

McCarthy Richardson for the Ph.D. degree in 

Phj^sics. Room 218 Physics Building. 



2:15 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Russell 
James Hutnik for the Ph.D. degree in Forestry. 
Room 109 Biological Sciences Budding. 

Saturday, March 28 

PLEASE NOTE: Quadrangle Pictures will be closed. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., Music Room in East Duke Building 
(this week onlv). All are welcome. 
EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9 :30 A.M., Holy Communion and distribution 
of palms ; 7 :15 P.M., Lenten Ecumenical Forum. 
Monday, 7:10 A.M., Holy Communion. Tuesday, 
7:10 A.M., Holy Communion; 5:15 P.M., Inquirer's 
Class. Wednesday, 7 :10 A.M., Holy Communion. 
Maundy Thursday, 7 :10 A.M., Holy Communion. 
Easter Even (Saturday), 5:00 P.M., Lighting of the 
Paschal Candle. 

There will be an Easier Celebration of Holy 
Communion at 11 :00 P.M. on Saturday. All members 
of the University are cordially invited to attend. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R. Patton) : Sunday, 7:15 P.M., Forum at 
Episcopal Center. Monday, 5:45 P.M., Ivy Room, 
Supper Meeting followed by discussion of Honest to 
God by John A. T. Robinson. Wednesday, 6 :30 P.M., 
East Duke Chapel, Communion Service. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, 9:00 
A.M., Seminar: Honest to God — Light breakfast, fol- 
lowed by discussion. 6 :00 P.M., Evening Prayer. 

The Methodist Lenten Atlanta Seminar on "The 
Church and Social Change in a Southern City" will 
be held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 1-5 (Wed.- 
Sunday). The Seminar will be concerned to under- 
stand the major areas of social problems and change 
in Atlanta and to find out how the Church is acting 
or not acting in relation to these problems. The cost 
of the Seminar is $30.00, which includes room, 
breakfasts, three play tickets, and return trans- 
portation. Any person interested should contact 
Cranford Johnson or Jack Carroll at the Center (286- 
9230) immediately. 

On Sunday, April 12, at 8 :30 A.M., Dr. Richard 
Shaull, of Princeton Theological Seminary and Brazil, 
will speak and lead a discussion at the Methodist 
Center on "The Christian in a 'World Come of 
Age.' ' Breakfast will be served at 8:30 A.M. Cost 
will be 50^. Those interested in participating should 
call ext. 2909 or 2921 to make reservations by Thurs- 
day, April 9, or sign the list posted at the Methodist 
Center. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson): Sunday, 5:30 P.M., Interdenominational 
Fellowship Supper and Vespers. Afterwards, attend 
Lenten Forum at Episcopal Center. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
(Chaplain John J. Carey): Sunday, 9:30 A.M.-4:00 
P.M., Spring Retreat at Camp New Hope. Trans- 
portation will leave from the Chapel steps and the 



!2] 



East Campus circle at 9 :00 A.M. (No luncheon this 

Thursday). 

UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. George F. MacLeod, Founder 
and Leader, The Iona Conmiunity, Scotland, will 
deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
AVorship at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday, March 22nd, in 
the University Chapel. His subject will be "The 
Kingship of Christ." The order of worship follows: 

Presiding Minister: The Eeverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University. 
Lector: Dr. Harold W. Lewis, Dean of Arts and Sciences, 

Vice-Provost, Professor of Physics 
Opening Organ and Brass Choir Voluntary 

Chorale—' ' All Glory Be to God on High ' ' Bach 

Processional — "Entrata Festiva" Flor Peeters 

Hymn of Adoration — "Hosanna, Loud Hosanna" 

Gesangbuch der Herzogl 
Prayers of Confession and For Pardon 
Words of Assurance 
The Lord's Prayer 

Anthem — "Humbly Kneel We Before Thee" Mozart 

Scripture Lesson — John 19:17-22 

Hymn — ' ' All Glory, Laud, and Honor ' ' Melchior Teschner 

Call to Prayer 
Prayer of Thanksgiving 
Prayers of Intercession and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "Blessed Are The Men Who Fear Him" 

from Elijah Mendelssohn 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — ' ' The Kingship of Christ ' ' 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Amen" James Young 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Toccata on " Filii et Filiae ' ' 

Farnum 

Next Sunday, March 29th falls Avithin the Spring 
academic recess. Therefore, the regular University 
Service of Worship will not be conducted on this 
Sunday. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will hold a seminar 
on Monday, March 23rd at 12:00 noon in Room M- 
201 Davison Building. Dr. John Billingham, Chief, 
Environmental Physiology Branch, Manned Space- 
craft Center, Houston, Texas will speak on the sub- 
ject: "Some Physiological Problems in the Space En- 
vironment. ' ' 



SANITARY ENGINEERING LECTURE 
On Monday, March 23rd at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 125 
of the Auditorium of the Engineering Building, Dr. 
Kenneth J. Ives, Reader, Department of Civil Engi- 
neering, University College, London, will speak on the 
subject : " The Water Supply for the City of London. ' ' 
Dr. Ives is currently Visiting Associate Professor of 
Sanitary Engineering in the Department of Environ- 
mental Sciences and Engineering and Visiting 
Foreign Research Science Fellow of the National 
Sciences Foundation at the University of North 
Carolina, Chapel Hill. 



PALM SUNDAY CONCERT 
"MUSIC FOR ORGAN AND STRINGS" 

The Department of Music will present ' ' Music for 
Organ and Strings" on Palm Sunday afternoon, 
March 22nd at 4:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. 
Allan Bone will conduct the group with Mildred L. 
Hendrix as organist, and with selected string players 
from the Duke Symphony Orchestra. The University 
Community and the general public are cordially in- 
vited to attend. The program will be as follows : 



Concerto No. 5 in F Major for 

Organ and Orchestra, Opus 4, No. 5 

Larghetto 

Allegro 

Alia Siciliana 

Presto 
Sonatas for Organ and Strings 

No. 4 in D Major, (K. 144) Allegro 

No. 1 in E-flat Major, (K. 67) Andante 

No. 9 in F Major, (K. 244) Allegro 
Adagio and Rondo for Organ and Strings 

(originally written for the Glass Harmonica) 
Concerto No. 1 for Organ and Orchestra 

Andante 
Concerto in G Minor for Organ, Strings and Timpani 

Andante — Allegro giocoso 

Andante moderato 

Allegro (molto agitato) — Largo 



Handel 



Mozart 



Mozart 
Handel 



Poulene 



ECONOMICS SEMINAR 

The Economics Seminar will meet Monday, March 
23rd at 4 :00 p.m. in 101 Gray Building. Professor 
Abba P. Lerner of Michigan State University will 
discuss "Freedom From Gold." 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE LECTURE 

The Department of Germanic Languages and the 
University's Program in Comparative Literature an- 
nounce a lecture on Monday, March 23rd at 4 :00 p.m. 
in 208 Flowers Building. Professor Haskell M. Block, 
Professor of Comparative Literature at Brooklyn Col- 
lege, Brooklyn, New York, will speak on "The Im- 
pact of French Symbolism on Modern American 
Poetry." 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, March 23rd, in the Auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. 
Mr. John S. Roberts, Department of Zoology, will 
speak on ' ' Renal Non-Function : Its Correlation with 
Renal Nonstructure. " Coffee and tea will be served 
in the foyer at 4 :00. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
GUEST SPEAKER PROGRAM 

The College of Engineering Guest Speaker Pro- 
gram will present Mr. R. S. Sherwood, Tuesday, 
March 24th, at 11 :30 a.m. in the Auditorium of the 
Engineering Building. Mr. Sherwood, Manager of 
Engineering, Gleason Works, Rochester, New York, 
will speak on the subject: "The Project Engineer — 
A Civil, A Mechanical, or Should He Be An Electri- 
cal?" 



[3] 



COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS LECTURE 

Mr. K. G. V. Krishna will speak on "Economic 
Aspects of Closer Union in East Africa" in Room 105 
of Carr Building at 2 :00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 24th. 
Mr. Krishna holds the position of Lecturer in the 
Department of Economics of the Royal College in 
Nairobi, Kenya, and is serving this year as a visiting 
professor at Syracuse University. His address is being 
sponsored by the Duke University Committee on 
International Relations. All interested students and 
faculty members are cordially invited to attend. 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB MEETING 

The International Club will have a dinner-discus- 
sion meeting on Tuesday, March 24th at 5 :45 p.m. 
in the Men's Graduate Center, Dining Hall A. Dr. 
Robert Crane, Professor of History, will speak on 
' ' Indo-American Relations: A Case Study in Inter- 
national Communications." His talk will begin at 
6:30 p.m. 

All interested persons are welcome, either before 
or after dinner. 



KAPPA DELTA PI INITIATION 

The mid-year initiation ceremonies to membership 
in Kappa Delta Pi, honor society in Education, will 
be held on Tuesday, March 24th at 6 :30 p.m. in the 
Green Room of East Duke Building. Mrs. Hazel 
Harris, president, is in charge of the ceremonies, with 
Herschel Peddicord in general charge of the program. 



ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club announces a joint meeting with 
the Philological Club of the University of North Caro- 
lina at Chapel Hill. This meeting will be held on the 
UNC campus on Tuesday, April 7th at 8 :00 p.m. in 
Room 403 of Dey Hall, located opposite the library. 
Professor Holger 0. Nygard of the English Depart- 
ment will be the speaker and will address the joint 
group on "Ballad, Polkevise, Chanson Populaire. " 
Everyone is cordially invited to attend. 



JOINT DUKE-UNC PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM 

The Joint Duke-U.N.C. Physics Colloquium will 
meet Tuesday, March 24th at 8 :00 p.m. in Room 114 
Physics Building. The speaker will be Dr. Per-Olov 
Lowdin, Professor of Physics at the University of 
Florida and the University of Uppsala, Upsalla, 
Sweden. The topic is to be "Some Aspects of 
Quantum Genetics and the Biological Problems of 
Mutations, Aging, and the Occurrence of Tumors." 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT PRESENTS 
AN EVENING WITH IAIN HAMILTON 

The Department of Music is pleased to present the 
fourth in the series of "Five Evenings With Iain 
Hamilton" on Tuesday, March 24th at 8:15 p.m. in 
the Music Room, East Duke Building. Entitled "A 
Benjamin Britten Evening," the program will feature 



performances of Britten's Michelangelo Sonnets by 
John Hanks, tenor, and Ruth Friedberg, pianist, and 
Lachrymae by Julia Mueller, violist, and Ruth Fried- 
berg, pianist. Recorded extracts from the War 
Requiem (1963) will provide additional illustrations 
of Britten's writing. Mr. Hamilton, Mary Duke 
Biddle Professor of Music, will comment on the works 
performed and on Britten's compositions in general. 
The University Community and the general public 
are cordially invited to attend. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURE 

The Reverend John H. Crum, Director of Social 
Action, the North Carolina Council of Churches, will 
speak on the work of the North Carolina Council of 
Churches and Social Action on Wednesday, March 
25th at 11 :00 a.m. in York Chapel, Divinity School. 
The University Community is cordially invited. 



FACULTY CLUB 
LUNCHEON-MEETING 

The Faculty Club will meet for lunch on Wednes- 
day, March 25th, at 12:30 p.m. in the Union Ball- 
room. The speaker will be Dr. Michael Polanyi, 
during the current semester James B. Duke Visiting 
Professor in the Department of Religion. Professor 
Polanyi will speak on some reflections on the modern 
university. Prior to Professor Polanyi 's address, the 
Club will hold its annual business meeting. 



ENGINEERING FACULTY COUNCIL MEETING 

The Engineering Faculty Council will meet on 
Wednesday, March 25th at 4:00 p.m. in the Con- 
ference Room of the Engineering Building. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
March 25th at 4:15 p.m. in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Darell McCloud, 
U. S. D. A. Forage and Range Research, Crops Re- 
search Division, Beltsville, Maryland, will speak on 
"Efficiency of Solar Energy Utilization by Crop 
Plants." 

Dr. McCloud is Investigations Leader for the 
Humid Pasture and Range Investigations at the 
Plant Industry Station, Beltsville. His present work 
is concerned primarily with pasture and range 
management for the eastern half of the nation. He 
formerly was an agronomist at the University of 
Florida, a consultant for Johns Hopkins University, 
Laboratory of Climatology, and a consultant to the 
Bioclimatics Division, U. S. Weather Bureau. He has 
received many recognitions and honors including the 
Outstanding Scientist Award at the University of 
Florida. He is a member of Sigma Xi, Phi Sigma, 
and Gamma Sigma Delta. He received the B.S.A. in 
1945 and Ph.D. in 1949 from Purdue University. 
He has authored or co-authored more than 50 papers 
in his field. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 



[41 



FORESTRY LECTURE 

The Department of Forestry will hold a Lecture 
on Wednesday, March 25th, at 8 :15 p.m. in the 
Biological Sciences Auditorium. Dr. G. L. Barger, 
Director, National Weather Records Center, Asheville, 
North Carolina, will speak on "Forestry Operations 
and Weather Risks." 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Miss Betty McCarthy 
Richardson for the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be 
held on Thursday, March 26th at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 
218 Physics Building. The subject of Miss Richard- 
son's dissertation is "Studies of the Triplet-Singlet 
Decay Life-Time for Certain Organic Crystals at Low 
Temperatures." The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors Hertha Sponer, 
Eugene Greuling, Horst Meyer, Henry W. Newson 
and Thomas M. Gallie. Professor Sponer will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Russell James Hutnik 
for the Ph.D. degree in Forestry will be held on 
Thursday, March 26th, at 2:15 p.m. in Room 109 
Biological Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. 
Hutnik 's dissertation is "Accumulation and Produc- 
tion in Red Pine (Pinus Resinosa AIT.) Plantations 
at Various Spacings." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors Frank W. 
Woods, Paul J. Kramer, J. G. Osborne, E. S. Harrar, 
and C. W. Ralston. Professor Woods will preside. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY DINING HALLS 
SPRING HOLIDAY SCHEDULE 

Thursday, March 26: The Oak Boom will close after Lunch. 

Eeopen for Lunch Monday, April 6 
Blue and White Room will close after Lunch 
University Room — Breakfast, Snack Bar, Lunch and Dinner 
Friday, March 27: University Boom — Breakfast, Snack Bar, 

Lunch and Dinner 
Saturday, March 28: University Room — Breakfast, Snack Bar, 

Lunch — Closed Saturday Dinner 
Sunday, March 29: Closed 
Monday, March 30: University Room — Breakfast, Snack Bar, 

Lunch and Dinner 
Tuesday, March 31: Blue and White Room — Breakfast, Snack 

Bar, Lunch and Dinner 
Wednesday, April 1: Blue and White Room — Lunch only 

University Room — Breakfast, Snack Bar, Lunch and Dinner 
Thursday, April 2: University Room— Breakfast, Snack Bar, 

Lunch and Dinner 
Blue and White Room — Lunch only 
Friday, April 3: Blue and White Room— Lunch only 

University Room— Breakfast, Snack Bar, Lunch and Dinner 
Saturday, April 4: University Room — Breakfast, Snack Bar, 

Lunch and Dinner 
Sunday, April 5 : Blue and White Room— Breakfast, Lunch and 

Dinner 
Monday, April 6: Regular Schedule 

THE DINING HALLS WILL CLOSE AFTER LUNCH 
SATURDAY, MARCH 28 THROUGH SUNDAY, MARCH 
29. 



FRIEDRICH HEBBEL EXHIBIT 

The Department of Germanic Languages in con- 
junction with the Department of English (Speech and 
Drama) announce a current exhibit on the life and 
work of the German dramatist and poet Friedrich 
Hebbel (1813-1863) in the Current Periodical Room 
of the Woman's College Library. The exhibit is on 
loan from the Grosses Haus, Municipal Theater, 
Frankfort, Germany, and will be on display from 
March 10th through March 31st. 



EAST GALLERY ART EXHIBIT 

Works by Edith London 

The Gallery in the East Campus Library will house 
an exhibition of recent works by Edith London dur- 
ing the month of March. Mrs. London, who came to 
Duke in 1939 when her husband, the late Dr. Fritz 
London joined the University's Physics Department, 
is known throughout the area as an artist of un- 
common ability. She has studied in her native Berlin 
and in Paris with the internationally esteemed artists, 
Marcel Gromaire and Andre Lhote. However, her 
art owes much to her own sensitive and thoughtful 
nature and to many years of perceptive seeing. Al- 
though her work is distinguished by its delicacy of 
color and texture, one cannot overlook the intellectual 
discipline of composition and form that underlies the 
more sensuous aspect of her style. 

The exhibition is composed of 27 items of which 15 
are oils, 6, pen and ink drawings; and 6, collages. 
Several private collectors have loaned works for the 
exhibition, and the North Carolina Museum of Art has 
generously sent two of Mrs. London's works from its 
collections. The inclusion of several earlier paintings 
allows one to see the evolution of Mrs. London's style 
to the complete abstraction evident in her most recent 
canvases. Certainly, her increasing use of the medium 
of collage stands as a contributing factor to her 
current investigation of the evocative and associative 
qualities of color, form, and texture, unconfined by the 
limitations of recognizable subject matter. Her works 
invite long and increasingly enriching contemplation. 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows: 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via ELM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC! — Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 



[5] 



SPRING RECESS 
LIBRARY SCHEDULE 



General Library 



Thursday, March 26 — 

Friday, March 27 
Saturday, March 28 
Sunday, March 29 
Monday, March 30 — 

Friday, April 3 
Saturday, April 4 
Sunday, April 5 
Monday, April 6 



8:00 A.M.— 5:00 P.M. 
8:00 A.M.— 1:00 P.M. 
Closed 

8:00 A.M.— 5:00 P.M. 

8:00 A.M.— 1:00 P.M. 

Closed 

Resume Regular Schedule 



Woman's College Library 
Thursday, March 26 8:00 A.M.— 5:00 P.M. 

Friday, March 27 9:00 A.M.— 5:00 P.M. 

Saturday, March 28 9:00 A.M.— 1:00 P.M. 

Sunday, March 29 Closed 

Monday, March 30 — 

Friday, April 3 9:00 A.M.— 5:00 P.M. 

Saturday, April 4 9:00 A.M.— 1:00 P.M. 

Sunday, April 5 Closed 

Monday, April 6 Resume Regular Schedule 

Schedules for other school, college and depart- 
mental libraries will be posted in those libraries. 



TRIANGLE PLAYERS PRESENTATION 

A new, original play, "Except We Got Robins" 
by Dalton Smith of Chapel Hill, will open Sunday, 
March 22nd at 9:30 p.m. at the Triangle Coffee 
House, 1205 Duke University Road, for a three-run 
performance. The short play will be repeated 
Wednesday, March 25th and Sunday, March 29th. 
Also at the Coffee House is an art show by Zada 
Miller of Durham to be shown through April 2nd. 



PASSOVER OBSERVANCE 

Those desiring to join a Jewish family for the 
traditional Passover Sedar on Friday, March 27th 
or Saturday, March 28th, should call Mrs. Leon 
Dworsky at 681-6294 by Wednesday, March 18th. 
Services will be held at Beth-El Congregation (Watts 
St. and Markham Ave.) on March 27th at 6:30 p.m., 
on March 28th at 9 :00 a.m. and 6 :30 p.m., and on 
March 29th at 9 :00 a.m. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 



STUDENT UNION MAJOR ATTRACTION 
BOSTON POPS CONCERT 

The return to classes after the spring recess will 
be considerably cheered by the performance on Mon- 
day evening, April 6th of the Boston Pops Tour 
Orchestra Concert. The Boston Pops Tour Orchestra, 
under the direction of renowned Pops Conductor, 
Arthur Fiedler, with play in the Indoor Stadium on 
April 6th at 8:15 p.m. the BPTO, organized by 
special arrangement with the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, is currently making its eighth U. S. tour. 
The concert of the Pops Tottr Orchestra will exempli- 
fy the astute program planning for which Fiedler is 
famous, and his fans will have the opportunity to 
hear him conduct selections from his wide-ranging 
Pops repertoire with the dynamic action and orches- 
tral control which have won him international fame. 
To its millions of fans, the Boston Pops means light, 



delightful, classical music, expertly souffled and 
served by Arthur Fiedler and his master musicians. 
Tickets : On sale starting Wednesday, March 18, 1964, 
Page Box Office. 

Prices $2.50 ($1 0Q Reduction) 

1.50 ($ .75 Reduction) 
Reduction for all students — high-school, under- 
graduate, graduate, medical students. 
Selling times : 2 :00 — 5 :00 p.m. Monday through 
Friday 

All day on Monday, April 6th 
(9:00 a.m.— 8:15 p.m.) 

The program will be as follows : 

Introduction to Act III, from the 

"Swan Lake" Ballet Tchaikovsky 

Overture to ' ' Semiramide ' ' Rossini 

Piano Concerto No. 1 Rachmaninoff 

I. Vivace — II. Andante — 
III. Allegro vivace 

INTERMISSION 

Overture to ' ' Die Meistersinger ' ' Wagner 

"Wine, Woman and Song" Waltzes Johann Strauss, Jr. 

Selections from "The Sound of Music" Rodgers 

Pops Round-Up arr. Hayman 

Theme from "Lawrence of Arabia" Jarre 



ADVANCE NOTICE 



STUDENT UNION ADVENTURE SERIES 
JOY ADAMSON 

The Student Union Special Activities Committee 
will present Joy Adamson, author of the internation- 
al best sellers, Born Free, Living Free, and Forever 
Free, in a personal appearance and lecture on Tues- 
day, April 7th at 7 :30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. A 
high light of the program will be a showing of the 
color film, "The Story of Elsa and Me." Tickets, 
priced at 50^ for adults and 25^ for children (12 
years and under) will be available at the Page Box 
Office from 6 :30 p.m. on the day of the performance. 

Mrs. Adamson has enchanted thousands of read- 
ers with her adventures in raising Elsa the Lioness 
from cubhood to maturity and in achieving the in- 
credible feat of re-educating the pet for a return to 
life in the bush. It is no exaggeration to call Joy 
Adamson 's color film of this extraordinary relation- 
ship between man and beast a document unique in 
the annals of natural history. 

The Student Union invites the faculty and their 
families to attend this exciting evening of adventure. 



WEEKLY CALENDAR NOTICE 

Spring Recess begins at 12:30 p.m. on Thurs- 
day, March 26th with classes resuming on Monday, 
April 6th at 8 :00 a.m. There will be no University 
Weekly Calendar during the Spring Recess period, 
March 29th through April 4th. Notice for the 
Calendar of April 5th through the 11th should be 
submitted to the Calendar Office, 202-A Flowers 
Building not later than twelve o'clock noon on 
Wednesday, April 1st. 



[6] 



WEEK OF 



April 5-11, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



April 5-11, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, April 5 



Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. W. D. 
White, Assistant Professor of Religion. Presid- 
ing Minister: The Reverend Professor Barney 
L. Jones, Assistant Dean of Trinity College. 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 

The preacher for Sunday, April 12th will be 
Dr. Samuel Proctor, President, A. & T. College. 

Monday, April 6 

10:00 a.m. College of Engineering Symposium: "In- 
fluence of Shock and Vibration on Design." 
(See special notice for program.) Auditorium 
of Engineering Building. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. 
Ramon Margalef. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Attraction: The 
Boston Pops Tour Orchestra Concert. Indoor 
Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, April 7 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. Richard A. Goodling. 
12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Thomas 

Everett Nichols, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in 

Economics. Library Conference Room. 
3:30 p.m. University Religious Council Lecture. 

Speaker : Dr. Henry Hitt Crane. Music Room, 

East Duke Building. 
3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
5 :00 p.m. Council on Gerontology Seminar. Speak- 
er: Barbara E. Shenfield. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Duke Sailing Club Meeting. Speaker: 

Mr. Milt Ricketts. Room 101 West Duke 

Building. 
7:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club 

Meeting. Green Room, East Duke Building. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 

Floor, Card Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. University Religious Council Lecture. 

Speaker : Dr. Henry Hilt Crane. Music Room, 

East Duke Building. 
7:30 p.m. Student Union Lecture — Film Series: 

Joy Adamson, author of "Born Free," with 

color film, "The Story of Elsa and Me." Page 

Auditorium. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



8:00 p.m. Fritz London Memorial Lecture. Speaker: 
Dr. John Bardeen. Biological Sciences Build- 
ing Auditorium. 



Wednesday, April 8 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. Richard A. Goodling. 
11:00 a.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 

Speaker : Dr. Darrell Randall. 
2:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Gordon 
Ervin Jones for the Ph.D. degree in Physics. 
Room 218 Physics Building. 
4:00 p.m. Economics Seminar. Room 139 Social 
Science Building. Speaker: Professor George 
J. Stigler. 
4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker : Dr. Richard Korf . 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
"Divorce — Italian Style" 
Marcello Mastroianni and 
Academy Award Winner — 
'Best Original Screenplay," "Winner Cannes 
Festival Award— "Best Comedy," "Wonder- 
fully funny"— Time Mag. "The Season's 
Best Comedy ! "—Life Mag. 



and 9:00 p.m. 

Auditorium. 
(Italian) with 
Daniela Roeca. 



Thursday, April 9 



10:10 
2:00 

4:00 

4:00- 

4:15 

5:00 
5:00. 

7:30. 

8:00 

8:15 



a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. R. Allan Ross. 

p.m. The final examination of Mr. Samuel 
Adrian Dickson, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in 
Physics. Room 218 Physics Building, 
p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-204 Davison Building. Speaker : Dr. 
Esther Kokas. 

6:00 p.m. Registration for Duke University 
Conference on "Christianity and Social Revo- 
lution in Newly Developing Nations. ' ' Flowers 
Lounge. (See special notice.) 
p.m. Winchester Excavation Project Discus- 
sion Meeting. Room 130 Psychology-Sociology 
Building. Speaker: Dr. Martin Biddle. 
p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 
•9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building, 
p.m. Duke University Conference Keynote 
Address: Miss Barbara Ward. Page Audi- 
torium. 

p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Friday, April 10 



10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Richard A. Goodling and Mr. Hollis Wil- 
liams, Jr. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:00 p.m. Art Lecture. Auditorium of the Institute 
of Government, University of North Carolina, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Speaker: Dr. 
Justus Bier. 

Saturday, April 11 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Divorce — Italian Style" 

(Italian) with Marcello Mastroianni and 
Daniela Rocea. Academy Award Winner — 
"Best Original Screenplay," Winner Cannes 
Festival Award — "Best Comedy," "Wonder- 
fully funny ' '—Time Mag. ' ' The Season 's Best 
Comedy ! ' ' — Life Mag. 

8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society: New York String- 
Sextet. Music Room, East Duke Building. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER (Chaplain James 
W. Stines) : Friday, 6:15 P.M., Supper, followed by 
worship and seminars. Guest speaker will be Dr. 
William Strickland, Professor of New Testament 
Theology, Southeastern Baptist Seminary. April 12, 
1 :45 P.M., Rides leave East and West circles for the 
program at Murdoch School at Butner. April 17-19: 
North Carolina Baptist Student Union Spring Con- 
ference at Salisbury. Guest speaker will be Dr. 
Carlyle Maniey of Myers Park Baptist Church in 
Charlotte and Dr. Sam Southard of the Southern 
Baptist Seminary. Any interested persons are urged 
to register no later than April 13. Call 286-6097, or 
leave your name at the Baptist Student Center. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain Robert Mill) : 
Tuesday, 5 :15 P.M., Inquirer's Class. Wednesday, 
7:10 A.M., Holy Communion. Thursday, 5:30 P.M., 
Holy Communion. Friday, 4:00 P.M., Seminar on 
Christianity and Modern Man. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, April 
12, 8:30 A.M., Dr. Richard Shaull, of Princeton 
Theological Seminary and Brazil, will speak and lead 
a discussion at the Methodist Center on "The 
Christian in a 'World Come of Age.' " Breakfast 
will be served at 8 :30 A.M. ; cost will be 50e. Those 
interested in participating should call ext. 2909 or 
2921 to make reservations by Thursday, April 9, or 
sign the list posted at the Methodist Center. 



[2] 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
SYMPOSIUM 

The College of Engineering will hold a symposium, 
supported by the National Science Foundation, on the 
theme "Influence of Shock and Vibration on Design" 
on Monday, April 6th and Tuesday, April 7th. All 
interested persons are cordially invited to attend any 
of the lectures in the Engineering Auditorium. The 
program of events will be as follows : 

Monday, April 6 

10:00 a.m. Engineering Auditorium 

Greetings and Remarks — J. L. Meriam, College of Engi- 
neering 
Response Spectra — R. S. Ayre, Yale "University 
12:00 Noon. Lunch in the Union Ballroom 
1:45 p.m. Engineering Auditorium 

' ' Dynamic Problems Encountered in the Design of Space 
Vehicles ' ' — W. T. Thomson, University of California, 
Los Angeles 
"Some Applications of Dynamic Photoelasticity " — P. 
D. Flynn, Frankford Arsenal 
6:00 p.m. Dinner at Schrafft's Country Inn (Ladies Invited) 
"Field Conditions of Shock and Vibration" — I. Vig- 
ness, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory 

Tuesday, April 7 

10:00 a.m. Engineering Auditorium 

"Random Vibration" — S. H. Crandall, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology 
"Shock Testing" — C. E. Crede, California Institute of 
Technology 
12:00 Noon. Lunch in the University Ballroom 
1:45 p.m. Engineering Auditorium 

"Non-Linear Vibration Problems" — J. P. Den Hartog, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Adjournment at about 3:00 p.m. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly semi- 
nar on Monday, April 6th, in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building at 4 :15 p.m. Dr. Ramon 
Margalef, Institute de Investigaeiones Pesqueras, 
Barcelona, Spain, will speak on "New Tools in the 
Study of Synthetic Characters of Plankton Com- 
munities. ' ' Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer 
at 4:00 p.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Thomas Everett 
Nichols, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Economics will 
be held on Tuesday, April 7th, at 2:00 p.m. in the 
Library Conference Room. The subject of Mr. Nichols' 
dissertation is ' ' Interregional Competition in the Soy- 
bean Crushing Industry with Particular Attention to 
the Southeast." The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors C. B. Hoover, J. J. 
Spengler, C. E. Ferguson, "W. P. Yohe, and C. E. 
Bishop, University of North Carolina, Raleigh, N. C. 
Professor Hoover will preside. 



UNIVERSITY RELIGIOUS COUNCIL 
LECTURES 

The Special Observances Committee of the Uni- 
versity Religious Council will sponsor two open lec- 
tures by Dr. Henry Hitt Crane on the topic, "The 
Context of Sex," at 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. on Tues- 



day, April 7th in the Music Room of East Duke 
Building. Dr. Crane, former pastor of Central 
Methodist Church in Detroit, is an extremely popular 
preacher on college and university campuses across 
the country, and he has made several previous ap- 
pearances at Duke. 



STUDENT UNION MAJOR ATTRACTION 
BOSTON POPS CONCERT 

The return to classes after the spring recess will 
be considerably cheered by the performance on Mon- 
day evening, April 6th of the Boston Pops Tour 
Orchestra Concert. The Boston Pops Tour Orchestra, 
under the direction of renowned Pops Conductor, 
Arthur Fiedler, with play in the Indoor Stadium on 
April 6th at 8 :15 p.m. the BPTO, organized by 
special arrangement with the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, is currently making its eighth U. S. tour. 
The concert of the Pops Tour Orchestra will exempli- 
fy the astute program planning for which Fiedler is 
famous, and his fans will have the opportunity to 
hear him conduct selections from his wide-ranging 
Pops repertoire with the dynamic action and orches- 
tral control which have won him international fame. 
To its millions of fans, the Boston Pops means light, 
delightful, classical music, expertly souffled and 
served by Arthur Fiedler and his master musicians. 

Prices $2.50 ($1 0Q ^^^^ 

1.50 ($ .75 Reduction) 
Reduction for all students — high-school, under- 
graduate, graduate, medical students. 

Selling times : 2 :00-5 :00 p.m. Monday on Main 
Quadrangle. 
6 :30-8 :15 p.m. in Box Office of In- 
door Stadium 



The program will be as follows: 

Introduction to Act HI, from the 

"Swan Lake" Ballet 
Overture to " Semiramide " 
Piano Concerto No. 1 

I. Vivace — II. Andante — 
III. Allegro vivace 

Soloist: Ozan Marsh 

INTERMISSION 
Overture to ' ' Die Meistersinger ' ' 
"Wine, Woman and Song" Waltzes 
Selections from ' ' The Sound of Music ' 
Pops Round-Up 
Theme from "Lawrence of Arabia" 



Tchaikovsky 

Rossini 

Eachmaninoff 



Wagner 

Johann Strauss, Jr. 

Bodgers 

arr. Sayman 

Jarre 



GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Duke University Council on Gerontology will 
meet on Tuesday, April 7th, at 5 :00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. Barbara E. Shenfield, author of 
"Social Policies for Old Age" and lecturer in Sociol- 
ogy, Social Studies and Economics, Bedford College, 
University of London, will speak on ' ' Profile of Aging 
in Great Britain." Interested members of the Uni- 
versity Community are invited to attend this open 
seminar. 



[31 



DUKE SAILING CLUB MEETING 
The Duke Sailing Club will meet on Tuesday, 
April 7th at 7 :00 p.m. in Room 101 West Duke Build- 
ing, with a talk by Milt Rieketts, past Carolina Sailing 
Club Flying Dutchman champion from Greensboro. 
He will speak on ' ' Racing Rules and Tactics. ' ' Any- 
one interested is welcome to attend. 

The Club will also sponsor a regatta at Satterwhite 
Point on Kerr Lake on Sunday, April 12th at 10:30 
a.m. Any class boat may be entered by being at Sat- 
terwhite Point by 10 :15 a.m. on April 12th. 



STUDENT UNION ADVENTURE SERIES 
JOY ADAMSON 

The Student Union Special Activities Committee 
will present Joy Adamson, author of the internation- 
al best sellers, Born Free, Living Free, and Forever 
Free, in a personal appearance and lecture on Tues- 
day, April 7th at 7 :30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. A 
high light of the program will be a showing of the 
color film, "The Story of Elsa and Me." Tickets, 
priced at 50^ for adults and 25^ for children (12 
years and under) will be available at the Page Box 
Office from 6 .-30 p.m. on the day of the performance. 

Mrs. Adamson has enchanted thousands of read- 
ers with her adventures in raising Elsa the Lioness 
from cubhood to maturity and in achieving the in- 
credible feat of re-educating the pet for a return to 
life in the bush. It is no exaggeration to call Joy 
Adamson 's color film of this extraordinary relation- 
ship between man and beast a document unique in 
the annals of natural history. 

The Student Union invites the faculty and their 
families to attend this exciting evening of adventure. 



FRITZ LONDON 
MEMORIAL LECTURE 

The eighth Fritz London Memorial Lecture, spon- 
sored by the Duke Chapter of the Society of Sigma 
XI, will be given by Dr. John Bardeen on Tuesday, 
April 7th, at 8:00 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Bardeen, Professor 
of Physics and Electrical Engineering at the Univer- 
sitv of Ulinois, will speak on "UNDERSTANDING 
SUPERCONDUCTIVITY. ' ' 

Dr. Bardeen has made major advances in the un- 
derstanding of semiconductors and superconductivity. 
In 1956 he shared the Nobel Prize with Dr. W. H. 
Brattain and Dr. William Shockley for the discovery 
of the transistor effect. In 1962 he received the Fritz 
London Award for his contribution to the first suc- 
cessful microscopic theory of superconductivity. 

The lecture is open to the public. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURE 

The Divinity School will hold an open lecture on 
Wednesday, April 8th, at 11 :00 a.m. in York Chapel. 
Dr. Darrell Randall, Chairman, Africa Area Studies 
Program, School of International Service, American 
University, Washington, D. C. will speak on "What 
is the Matter with the New Nations?" The public is 
cordially invited to attend. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Gordon Ervin Jones 
for the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held on 
Wednesday, April 8th, at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 218 
Physics Building. The subject of Mr. Jones' disserta- 
tion is "Some Millimeter Wave Spectra of HBr, HC1 
and Co." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Walter Gordy, Eugene Greul- 
ing, Hertha Sponer, Henry Newsom, and F. G. Dres- 
sel. Professor Gordy will preside. 



ECONOMICS SEMINAR 

The Economics Seminar will be held on Wednes- 
day, April 8th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 139 Social Sci- 
ence Building. The speaker will be Professor George 
J. Stigler of the University of Chicago. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
April 8th, at 4:15 p.m. in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Richard Korf, De- 
partment of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, will 
speak on "A Systematist 's View of Modern Taxono- 
my." 

After receiving his B.Sc. in 1946 and Ph.D. in 
1950 at Cornell University, Professor Korf served as 
a Lecturer at Glasgow and later as a Fulbright Re- 
search Professor at Yokohama National University. 
He is a specialist in the taxonomy of the cup fungi 
and in recent years has directed his attention toward 
the Discomycete Flora of Asia, 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Samuel Adrian Dick- 
son, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held 
on Thursday, April 9th, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 218 
Physics Building. The subject of Mr. Dickson's dis- 
sertation is "Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Some 
Solidified Gases under High Pressure." The commit- 
tee to conduct the examination consists of Professors 
Horst Meyer, Walter Gordy, Henry W. Newson, 
Harold W. Lewis, and Seth Warner. Professor Meyer 
will preside. 



WINCHESTER EXCAVATION PROJECT 
DISCUSSION MEETING 

The British director of the archaeological excava- 
tions at Winchester, Mr. Martin Biddle, Professor of 
History at the University of Exeter, will visit Duke 
University Thursday, April 9th, as guest of the Duke 
Committee on the Winchester Project. At 4:15 p.m. 
in Room 130 Psychology-Sociology Building, he will 
describe the previous exploration of the Winchester 
sites and the campaign projected for the coming sum- 
mer. After his talk, illustrated by slides, he will 
answer questions from all persons interested in the 
excavations. Mr. Biddle wishes especially to meet all 
Duke students applying for appointment to the Duke 



[41 



party which will participate in the 1964 campaign, 
June 29th to September 6th. All others interested, 
however, are invited to attend. 

Mr. Biddle will lecture on the Winchester excava- 
tions to the North Carolina Society of the Archaeo- 
logical Institute of America at 8:00 p.m. Monday, 
April 13th, in 110 Murphey Hall, University of North 
Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. This lecture will be open 
to the public. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CONFERENCE ON 

'•CHRISTIANITY AND SOCIAL REVOLUTION 

IN NEWLY DEVELOPING NATIONS" 

In an effort to stimulate creative discussion across 
professional and disciplinary lines, the Divinity School 
of Duke University with the aid of the Ford Founda- 
tion will hold a four day conference on ' ' Christianity 
and Social Revolution hi Newly Developing Nations," 
on the campus, from the evening of Thursday, April 
9th, to the morning of Sunday, April 12th. The pub- 
lic is cordially invited to participate together with 
representatives of government, higher education, and 
religious agencies in all the major addresses and 
seminars. 

The keynote address, "Am I My Brother's Keep- 
er?" will be presented by Miss Barbara Ward, noted 
British economist and author, at 8:00 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium on Thursday, April 9th. She will be fol- 
lowed by a roster of distinguished speakers including : 
Dr. Paul Abrecht, Director of the World Council of 
Churches' study on "Churches in Areas of Rapid 
Social Change"; Dr. John Seott Everton, Vice Presi- 
dent of Education and World Affairs, former U. S. 
Ambassador to Burma; Dr. Samuel Proctor, Presi- 
dent of Agricultural and Technical College, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, and former and future Associate 
Director of the Peace Corps: Professor Richard 
Shaull, Princeton Theological Seminary, Latin Ameri- 
can expert; Dr. David Stowe, Executive Secretary, 
Division of Foreign Missions, National Council of 
Churches ; Mr. Nicholas O. Anim, Executive Secretary, 
Institute of Education, University of Ghana ; and Mr. 
Mariga T. Wangombe, Assistant Education Officer, 
Nairobi City and County. 

The program follows : 

Thursday, April 9, 1964 

4 - 6 p.m. Registration Flowers Lounge 

6:00 p.m. Opening Banquet Union Ballroom 

8:00 p.m. Keynote Address Page Auditorium 

Miss Barbara Ward, economist, author 
"AM I MY BBOTHEE'S KEEPER?" 
9:15 p.m. Panel Discussion Page Auditorium 

Friday, April 10, 1964 

9:00 a.m. Morning Worship Memorial Chapel 

9:30 a.m. Lecture Page Auditorium 

The Rev. Paul Abrecht, World Council of Churches 

"THE RESPONSE OF CHRISTIANS AND 
CHURCHES TO THE SOCIAL REVOLUTION" 

10:45 a.m. Seminar Discussion Groups Seminar Rooms 

2 : 00 p.m. Lecture Page Auditorium 

Mr. Nicholas O. Anim, Ghana 

Mr. Mariga T. Wangombe, Kenya 

"CHRISTIANITY AND SOCIAL 

REVOLUTION IN AFRICA" 



3:15 p.m. Seminar Discussion Groups .... Seminar Rooms 

6 :00 p.m. Banquet Union Ballroom 

8 :00 p.m. Address Page Auditorium 

Dr. M. Richard Shaull, Princeton Seminary 
"CHRISTIANITY AND SOCIAL 
REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICA" 
9:15 p.m. Panel Discussion Page Auditorium 

Saturday, April 11, 1964 

9:00 a.m. Morning Worship Memorial Chapel 

9:30 a.m. Lecture Page Auditorium 

Dr. John Seott Everton, Education and World Affairs 
"EDUCATIONAL DIMINSIONS OF 
SOCIAL REVOLUTION ' ' 
10:45 a.m. Seminar Discussion Groups .... Seminar Rooms 

2 :00 p.m. Lecture Page Auditorium 

Dr. David M. Stowe, Division of Foreign Missions, 

National Council of Churches 

"THE CHRISTIAN MISSION IN 

SOCIAL REVOLUTION" 

3:15 p.m. Seminar Discussion Groups .... Seminar Rooms 

8 : 00 p.m. Lecture Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium 

Dr. Bryon L. Johnson, Agency 

for International Development 

"DEVELOPING AN ADEQUATE 

SENSE OF COMMUNITY" 

9 : 15 p.m. Panel Discussion . . Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium 

Sunday, April 12, 1964 

11 :00 a.m. Chapel Service Duke Chapel 

President Samuel D. Proctor, Agricultural 

and Technical College, Greensboro 
"THE WRONG TIME TO BE SILENT" 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 
will hold a seminar on Thursday, April 9th, at 4 :00 
p.m. in Room M-204 Davison Building. The speaker, 
Dr. Esther Kokas, M.D., Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina, Department of Physiology, will speak on 
"Control of the Motility of Intestinal Villi." 



LECTURE BY DR. BIER ON 
"EARLY BOOK ART" 

Dr. Justus Bier, Director of the North Carolina 
Museum of Art and currently Benjamin N. Duke 
Visiting Professor in the Department of Art, will 
speak at an open lecture on Friday, April 10th, at 
8 :00 p.m. in the Auditorium of the Institute of Gov- 
ernment, University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Bier will discuss "Early Book Art; A Traveling 
Exhibition of the North Carolina Museum of Art." 
The lecture, sponsored by Beta Phi Mu, is open to the 
public without charge. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
NEW YORK STRING SEXTET 
The Chamber Arts Society will present the sixth 
and final concert of its season, to be played by the 
New York String Sextet on Saturday, April 11th, at 
8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. 
The musicians are Renato Bonacini and Kees Kooper 
(Violins), Paul Doktor and Emile Simonel (Violas), 



[5] 



Janos Seholz and George Koutzen (Cellos). The pro- 
gram follows : 

Boccherini Quintet in F major, Opus 13, No. 4 
Richard Strauss String Sextet from "Capriccio" 
Beethoven Quintet in C major, Opus 29 
Dvorak Quintet in E flat major, Opus 97 

Admission : 

The annual membership card admits to all con- 
certs. Guest card for a single admission costs $2.50. 
About 60 guest cards are available; they may be ob- 
tained at the Music Room door from 7 :30 to 8 :00 p.m. 
prior to the concert. Inquiries may be addressed to 
Chamber Arts Society, % Ernest W. Nelson, Box 6065, 
College Station. 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows: 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAO— Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 



UNDERGRADUATE 
BOOK COLLECTORS CONTEST 

The prize contest, for Undergraduate Book Collec- 
tors is sponsored jointly by The Friends of Duke 
University Library and the Gothic Bookshop, and is 
open to all Undergraduates. These prizes — of respec- 
tively $100, $60 and $40 worth of books, winner's 
choice — will be awarded this year. The closing date 
is April 8th. For full details see Jeremy North at the 
Gothic Bookshop. 



GERMAN EXAMINATION FOR 
CANDIDATES FOR GRADUATE DEGREES 

The German examinations for candidates for grad- 
uate degrees will be given on Monday, April 27th. 
Students register for this examination in the Grad- 
uate School Office not later than "Wednesday, April 
15th. 



THE BOTANY GREENHOUSES 
Four of the Department of Botany's greenhouses, 
containing plants used for teaching, are open to the 
public. There is a large conservatory of tropical plants 
of biologic and economic interest, a comparative col- 
lection of New and Old World succulents, and a 
seasonally changing assortment of plants grown for 
special uses. The greenhouses are open weekdays from 
9 :00 a.m. to 4 :30 p.m. and on Saturdays until noon. 



THE ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered an- 
nually for the best piece of creative writing submitted 
by an undergraduate student at Duke University. 
First Prize— $100.00 
Second Prize— $ 50.00 

CONDITIONS 

1. The prize is open to all undergraduates, both men 
and women. 

2. Only short stories (7500- word limit), one-act plays 
(7500-word limit), poems (200-line limit), and in- 
formal essays (5000-word limit) are eligible. 

3. Only one manuscript may be submitted by any 
contestant. 

4. All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and 
must be delivered to the English Office (325 Allen 
Building) by April 20. The author's name and 
address must appear nowhere except on a separate 
sheet placed before the manuscript. 

5. At the judges' discretion, the prize may be split 
equally between a winning prose and a winning 
poetry entry. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
STUDENT UNION OPERA HOUR 

The Student Union's Fine Arts Committee will 
hold an "opera hearing" on Sunday, April 12th in 
the Music Lounge of Flowers Building. Two under- 
graduates, Ed Home and Alice Estes, will present 
background material on the Mozart opera, "Cosi Fan 
Tutti," after which the entire opera will be played. 
All interested are invited to attend. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
GERMANIC LITERATURE LECTURE 

The Department of Germanic Languages an- 
nounces a lecture on Monday. April 13th, at 4.00 p.m. 
in Room 208 Flowers Building. Dr. Ernst Behler, 
Dozent in Philosophy at the Rheinische Friedrieh- 
Wilhelms-Universitat in Bonn, presently Visiting Pro- 
fessor of Germanic Languages at Washington Uni- 
versity, St. Louis, Missouri, will speak on "The 
Theory of Romantic Irony: Its Literary and 
Philosophical Implications. ' ' 



THE HARLEY AFRICAN COLLECTION 

The George W. Harley African Collection is now 
on display on the second floor of the Psychology- 
Sociology Building (Old Biology) outside the Depart- 
ment of Sociology and Anthropology. Dr. Harley is 
a distinguished alumnus, formerly assistant curator of 
the Biology Museum at old Trinity College, and later 
curator of the Pathology Museum at the Yale Medical 
School. Much of his collection of African masks is in 
the Peabody Museum at Harvard, where he did post- 
graduate work. After a number of years of medical 
work in West Africa. Dr. Harley began for President 
Tubman the government museum of ethnology and 
history in Liberia. The exhibit, will be on display 
during the spring semester. 



6] 



WEEK OF 



April 12-18, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



April 12-18, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, April 12 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Samuel D. Proctor, Associate Director United 
States Peace Corps. Sermon: "The Wrong 
Time To Be Silent." Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
1:45 p.m. Student Union Opera Hour. Music 

Lounge of Flowers Building. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Student Union Chess Club. Room 
204 Flowers Building. 



Monday, April 13 

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 63rd Annual Meeting of Associ- 
ation of Surgeons of the Southern Railway 
System. Jack Tar Hotel and Page Auditorium. 
(April 13, 14, and 15.) 

4:00 p.m. Germanic Literature Lecture. Room 
208 Flowers Building. Speaker.- Dr. Ernst 
Behler Dozent. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Anne 
Hurst. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Course Card Writing. Trinity 
College. 



8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, April 14 



10:10 

12:30 

3:30 

4:00 

4:15- 
5:00- 
7:00- 
7:30 
8:00 

8:00 



a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Mr. Ralph Eanes. 
•1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
•5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 

p.m. Economics Seminar. Room 139 Social 

Science Building. Speaker: Professor Jerome 

Rothenburg. 
6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 

208 Asbury Building. 
6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
9:00 p.m. Course Card Writing. Trinity Col- 
lege and Woman's College. 

p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 

Floor, Card Gymnasium. 

p.m. Student Union Open Seminar on Africa. 

Room 208 Flowers Building. Speaker: Dr. 

Davidson Nicol. 

p.m. Divinity Dames Meeting. Home of Dr. 

Hugh Anderson, 917 Green Street. Speaker: 

Dr. Thomas Langford. 

Wednesday, April 15 



10:00 a.m. Campus Club Coffee. 
Duke Street. 



Hill House on 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



10:10 
12:00 

4:30 

5:00 
5:00. 
5:45- 

7:00 
7:00 

7:00 

7:00 



a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Dr. Egil Gris'lis. 

noon. Botany Seminar. Auditorium Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker : Dr. Wolfgang 
Franke. 

p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Room 139 Social 
Science Building. Speaker: Dr. Peter Schan- 
bach. 

p.m. Photography Contest: Deadline for En- 
tries. Boom 102 Flowers Building. 
6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club. 
Green Room West Duke Building, 
p.m. Engineering Review Lecture. Room 
139 Engineering Building. Speaker : Professor 
T. H. Nash. 

p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel, 
and 9:00 p.m 
Auditorium. 
Sellers, Cecil 



Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
'Heavens Above!" with Peter 
Parker, and Ian Carmichael. 
Another delightful British comedy from the 
Boulting Brothers. "Devastating to the well- 
tuned bone" — N. Y. Times. "Sellers gets 
better and better" — Time Magazine. 
7:30 p.m. CORE Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Concert Band Spring Concert. 
Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium. 

Thursday, April 16 

9:30 a.m. Psychiatry Lecture. Room 203 Duke 
Hospital. Speaker: Dr. Michael Polanyi. 

9:45 a.m. Opening Session of Thirteenth Southern 
Municipal and Industrial Waste Conference. 
(April 16 and 17). See Special Notice. 
10:00 a.m. Newcomer's Club Meeting. Hope Valley 

Country Club. 
10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. Egil Grislis. 
12:30 p.m. Luncheon for 7th Annual Archive 
Festival. Old Trinity Room. 

3:00 p.m. 7th Annual Archive Festival. Music 
Room, East Duke Building. Speaker: -Joan 
Williams. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

6:00 p.m. Society of Friends Meeting. Friends 
Meeting House. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. 7th Annual Archive Festival. Panel Dis- 
cussion of Student Work. Panelists : Fred 
Chappell, Doris Betts, Robert Watson, and 
Joan Williams. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

8:15 p.m. French Plays. Branson Hall. 



Friday, April 17 



10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Holy Communion. Dr. Egil Grislis, Celebrant. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 
00 p.m. Student Union Pre-Artists Series Semi- 
nar. Room 208 Flowers Building. 
30 p.m. Bowling for Faculty aud their families 
at Sportland. Regular Rates Apply. 

8:15 p.m. Artist Series: John Browning, Pianist. 
Page Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. French Play. Branson Hall. 

Saturday, April 18 

9:00 a.m. Registration for North Carolina Chapter 
of the American Association of Teachers of 
French Annual Spring Meeting. Page Lobby. 
(For schedule, see special notice.) 

2:00 p.m. Student Union All-Campus Champion- 
ship Bridge Tournament. The Ark. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Heavens Above!" with Peter 
Sellers, Cecil Parker, and Ian Carmichael. 
Another delightful British comedy from the 
Boulting Brothers. "Devastating to the well- 
tuned bone" — N. Y. Times. "Sellers gets better 
and better" — Time Magazine. 

7:30 p.m. Joint Glee Clubs Concert. Alice M. 
Baldwin Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. French Play. Branson Hall. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Sunday, 1 :45 P.M., Rides leave East and West circles 
for the program at Murdoch School at Butner. April 
17-19: North Carolina Baptist Student Union Spring 
Conference at Salisbury. Guest speakers will be Dr. 
Carlyle Marney of Myers Park Baptist Church in 
Cha^otte and Dr. Sam Southard of the Southern 
Baptist Seminary. Any interested persons are urged 
to register no later than April 13. Call 286-6097, 
or leave your name at the Baptist Student Center. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 : T) P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9 :30 A.M., Holy Communion. Tuesday, 5 :15 
P.M., Inquirer's Class; 7:45 P.M., Meeting of Episco- 
pal University Council. Wednesday, 7 :10 A.M., Holy 
Communion. Thursday, 5 :30 P.M., Holy Communion. 
Friday, 3 :00 P.M., Seminar on Orthodoxy. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R, Patton) : Sunday, 6 :00 P.M., Lutheran 
Church in Chapel Hill ; Dr. Erb, Executive Secretary 
of the Board of Missions. Lutheran Church in Ameri- 
ca. Contact Roger Eriekson, Duke ext. 3539, for 
transportation. Cars will leave the Chapel steps and 
the East Campus circle at 5 :15. Monday, 5 :30 P.M., 



[21 



Men's Graduate Center, Supper meeting, followed by 
discussion of Christians Role in Politics. April 17, 
18, and 19, Camp Lutheridge, Arden, N. C, Retreat 
for Lutheran Students of Southeastern Region. Any 
interested student will need to contact Bill Patton, 
ph. 286-1551. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, 8:30 
A.M., Breakfast Discussion— " Religionless Christian- 
ity" — Dr. Richard Shaull, Princeton Theological 
Seminary and Brazil ; 6 -.00 P.M., Common meal and 
Holy Communion, followed by an address and dis- 
cussion of "The Methodist General Conference — 
1964" by Dr. Wilson 0. Weldon, Minister of W. 
Market Methodist Church, Greensboro, N. C. A Satur- 
day afternoon and evening work project, sponsored 
jointly by the Methodist Center and the Wesley Foun- 
dation at N.C.C., will be held in Warrenton, helping 
to clear ground for a community recreation center. 
The group will leave the Methodist Center at 12:30 
P.M., returning Saturday evening by 10:00 P.M. Call 
the Methodist Center for information. 

Wesley Players will present the drama, Bus Stop, 
by William Inge, at the Methodist Center on May 2, 
3, and 4. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Sunday, 4 :45 P.M., Meet at Center for rides 
to Chapel Hill for supper at UNC Westminster House 
and continuation of Politics and Religion Symposium 
sponsored by UNC, N. C. State and Duke Westminster 
Fellowship. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, home of Dr. and 
Mrs. Richard Goodling, Farrington Road. Chaplain 
Cranford Johnson will discuss the work of the World 
Student Christian Federation and the recent W.S.C.F. 
meeting at Athens, Ohio. Transportation will leave 
from the Chapel steps, East Campus circle and Hanes 
House at 5:15 P.M. Thursday, 12:40 P.M., Luncheon 
at Gilbert- Addoms. 

UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Samuel D. Proctor, Associate 
Director, United States Peace Corps, will deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship at 11 :00 
a.m. on Sunday, April 12th in the University Chapel. 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the ser- 
mon at the University Service of Worship next Sun- 
day, April 19th, is the Reverend Professor Robert E. 
Cushman, Dean of the Divinitv School. 



STUDENT UNION OPERA HOUR 

The Student Union's Fine Arts Committee will 
hold an "opera hearing" at 1:45 p.m. on Sunday, 
April 12th in the Music Lounge of Flowers Building. 
Two undergraduates, Ed Home and Alice Estes, will 
present background material on the Mozart opera, 
"Cosi Fan Tutti," after which the entire opera will 
be played. All interested are invited to attend. 



GERMANIC LITERATURE LECTURE 

The Department of Germanic Languages an- 
nounces a lecture on Monday, April 13th, at 4.00 p.m. 
in Room 208 Flowers Building. Dr. Ernst Behler, 



Dozent in Philosophy at the Rheinische Friedrich- 
Wilhehns-Universitat in Bonn, presently Visiting Pro- 
fessor of Germanic Languages at Washington Uni- 
versity, St. Louis, Missouri, will speak on "The 
Theory of Romantic Irony: Its Literary and 
Philosophical Implications. ' ' 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly semi- 
nar on Monday, April 13th in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Dr. Anne 
Hurst, Department of Zoology, will speak on "The 
Mechanism of a Proboscis." Coffee and tea will be 
served in the foyer at 4 :00. 

ECONOMICS SEMINAR 

The Economics Seminar will meet Tuesday, April 
14th, at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 139 Social Science Build- 
ing. Professor Jerome Rothenberg of Northwestern 
University will speak on "Coalitions and Group De- 
cision-Making. 

STUDENT UNION OPENS 
SEMINAR ON AFRICA 

The Student Union will present Dr. Davidson 
Nicol, African doctor and educator, in an open semi- 
nar on "Aspects of Development in Independent 
Africa" on Tuesday, April 14th at 8 :00 p.m. in Room 
208 Flowers Building. 

Visiting the United States and Canada on the 
invitation of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, 
Dr. Nicol and his wife are the guests of the Common- 
wealth-Studies Center while in Durham. Dr. Nicol is 
the Principal of University College of Freetown, 
Sierra Leone, a graduate with honors in Biochemistry 
from Christ's College of Cambridge, and the first 
African to be elected a Fellow of an Oxford or 
Cambridge college. In addition to his medical re- 
search — which includes the co-discovery of the struc- 
ture of human insulin — Dr. Nicol is vitally concerned 
with the future of Africa and his own Sierra Leone. 
In 1958 he left his position as a Fellow of Christ's 
College to return to Sierra Leone as Government 
Pathologist. Since then Dr. Nicol has devoted his life 
to improving higher education in Africa. 

For the open seminar here, Dr. Nicol will present 
a lecture and film on certain aspects of the develop- 
ment and progress of independent countries in Africa, 
especially in the field of education. 



ENGINEERING REVIEW LECTURE 

The Engineering Review Lecture will be held on 
Wednesday, April 15th at 7:00 p.m. in Room 139 
Engineering Building. Professor T. H. Nash will 
speak on "Kinematics-Kinetics." 



CAMPUS CLUB COFFEE 
The Campus Club will have a Morning Coffee on 
Wednesday, April 15th at 10 :00 a.m. in Hill House 
on Duke Street. Hostess Departments will be German, 
Greek, Latin, Romance Languages and Russian, and 
Mrs. Gifford Davis will be Chairman. Special feature 
of the occasion will be an "International Exhibit of 
our Own World Travelers" presented by Program 
Chairman, Mrs. Wiley D. Forbus. 



[3] 



DIVINITY DAMES MONTHLY MEETING 

The Divinity Dames monthly meeting will be held 
on Tuesday, April 14th at 8 :00 p.m. at the home of 
Dr. Hugh Anderson, 917 Green Street. Dr. Thomas 
Langf ord will be the guest speaker. His topic is ' ' Con- 
temporary Theology." 

The election of new officers will be held. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
April 15th at 12:00 noon in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building, West Campus. Dr. Wolf- 
gang Franke of the Institut fiir landwirtschaftliche 
Botanik, Universitat Bonn, Western Germany will 
speak on "Morphology and Nature of Ectodesmata." 

As Professor of Botany at the Institute of Agri- 
cultural Botany, Dr. Franke is best known to the 
English-speaking audience for his paper that appeared 
in the September, 1961, issue of American Journal of 
Botany: Ectodesmata and foliar absorption. 

PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 
The Psychology Colloquium will be held on 
Wednesday, April 15th at 4:30 p.m. in Eoom 139 
Social Science Building. Dr. Peter Schonbach, Visit- 
ing Associate Professor of Psychology, will speak on 
the topic, "Language Effects on Attitudes." 

Dr. Schonbach received his Ph.D. in 1956 at the 
University of Minnesota as a Research Associate at 
the Institute fur Sozialforschung in Frankfurt am 
Main, and a lecturer at the University of Frankfurt. 
His research and teaching activities have been con- 
cerned with group dynamics, intergroup attitudes, 
and psycholinguistics. 



DUKE CONCERT BAND CONCERT 

The Department of Music will present the Duke 
Concert Band, with Paul Bryan, conductor, in its 
spring concert on Wednesday, April 15th, at 8 :15 p.m. 
in the Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium. Featured on 
the program will be the premier performance of Iain 
Hamilton's "The Chaining of Prometheus" commis- 
sioned by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation in 1963 
and the solo performance of John Hanks, tenor. The 
University Community and the general public are 
cordially invited to attend. The complete program 
will be as follows : 

Dance Variations Ingolf Dahl 

The Chaining of Prometheus Iain Hamilton 

Commissioned by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation 
for the Duke University Concert Band (1963) 

Prelude (Modirato) 

Aria I (Lento) 

Interlude (Presto) 

Aria II (Grave) 

Postlude (Lento) 
The Merrymakers, a miniature Overture Eric Coates 

ESTTEKMISSION 
November 1963 : In Memoriam E. E. Trevarthen 

Three Arias for Tenor 

"Oh image Angel-like and fair" 

from The Magic Flute W. A. Mozart 

"Let me wander not unseen" and "Oh let 

the merry bells ring out" from Z' Allegro G. F. Handel 
Mattinata Euggiero Leoncavallo 

John Hanks, Tenor 
Four Scottish Dances Malcolm Arnold 



STUDENT UNION 
PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST 

The Fine Arts Committee of the Student Union 
extends an invitation to all undergraduate students, 
graduate students, faculty, and staff to participate in 
the 1963-64 Student Union Photographic competition. 
All entries must be accepted by the Selections Com- 
mittee and should be submitted to Room 102 Flowers 
Building on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, April 
13th through the loth between 7 :30 p.m. and 9 :00 p.m. 
with Wednesday as the deadline. Specification sheets 
are posted and are available at the Information Desk. 
The exhibit may be viewed and will be judged in the 
Alumni Lounge, West LTnion Building through the 
end of the month. 



PSYCHIATRY LECTURE 

Dr. Michael Polanyi, distinguished scientist, phy- 
sician and philosopher, and currently James B. Duke 
Distinguished Professor in the Department of Reli- 
gion, will speak on "Some Reflections on Mind-Body 
Problems — Their Bearing on Psychiatry" at 9 :30 a.m. 
on Thursday, April 16th in Room 2031 Duke Hospital. 
The University Community is invited to attend. 



THIRTEENTH SOUTHERN MUNICIPAL 
AND INDUSTRIAL WASTE CONFERENCE 
Duke University will be host to the Thirteenth 
Southern Municipal and Industrial Waste Conference 
on Thursday, April 16th and Friday, April 17th 
which is jointly sponsored by Duke, North Carolina 
State and the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. The program provides for a wide range of inter- 
ests in matters relating to utilization of the water 
resources of the southeastern states. 

Keynoter for the Conference will be the Honor- 
able Edmund S. Muskie, from Maine, Chairman of 
the Special Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollu- 
tion of the Committee on Public Works, United States 
Senate. Dr. Kenneth J. Ives of University College, 
London will speak on "The Control of Pollution for 
the Water Supply of London" at lunch on April 16th. 
Mr. Dan K. Moore, Vice Chairman of the North Caro- 
lina State Board of Water Resources will give the 
Banquet Address Thursday evening. The meeting will 
close Friday afternoon with a Symposium of Inter- 
relationships Among Water Resources, Pollution Con- 
trol and Industrial Growth of the Southeast. 

A limited number of tickets for the luncheons and 
the banquet are available. For information, contact : 
Dr. Edward H. Bryan, Department of Civil Engineer- 
ing, Conference Chairman at extension 2434. Detailed 
programs are also available from Dr. Brvan. 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS MEETING 

The Society of Friends (Quakers) will hold their 
monthly meeting for business on Thursday, April 
16th at 7 :30 p.m., preceded by potluck supper at 
6 :00 p.m. at the Friends Meeting House on Alexander 
Street. For information call Mrs. Martha Klopfer at 
286-4868. All are welcome. 



[41 



SEVENTH ANNUAL ARCHIVE FESTIVAL 
The Seventh Annual Archive Literary Festival 
will be held on Thursday, April 16th, in the Music 
Room of East Duke Building with an afternoon ses- 
sion at 3 :00 p.m. with Joan Williams reading from 
her novel, The Morning and the Evening, and an eve- 
ning session at 8 :15 p.m. with a panel discussion of 
the student stories from the Archive. All sessions are 
open to the public without charge. 

Joan Williams who in private life is Mrs. Ezra 
Bowen is a native Mississippian now living in West- 
port, Connecticut. Her first novel The Morning and 
the Evening won the 1962 John P. Marquand Award 
for the Book-of-the-Month Club. The panelists, chair- 
maned by Fred Chappell, Duke graduate and present- 
ly a graduate student in the English Department, is 
the author of the novel, It is Time, Lord. He is joined 
by Doris Betts, writer from Sanford, North Carolina, 
author of the novel, Tall Houses in Winter ; Dr. Rob- 
ert Watson, poet and member of the English Depart- 
ment at the University of North Carolina in Greens- 
boro, author of a book of poems entitled, A Paper 
Horse and Miss Williams. 



NEWCOMERS' CLUB MEETING 
The Annual Business Meeting and Coffee of the 
Newcomers' Club will be held on Thursday, April 
16th at 10:00 a.m. at the Hope Valley Country Club. 
Mrs. Arthur Larson, president of the Duke University 
Campus Club, will be the hostess for the event. 



FRENCH PLAYS 



Every spring since 1935, with the exception of a 
few of the World War II years, the University Com- 
munity and surrounding areas have had the oppor- 
tunity to attend a full scale performance of a French 
play, classical or modern, performed in French by an 
all student east. Mrs. Neal Dow of the French De- 
partment has served as director, producer, and cos- 
tumer for all these performances and will this year 
direct two plays, "La Farce du Cuvier" and Alfred 
de Musset's, "Fantasio." They will be played on four 
successive evenings, Thursday, April 16th through 
Sunday, April 19th in Branson Hall at 8 :15 p.m. and 
are open to the public without charge. 

' ' La Farce du Cuvier" is a one act folk play dating 
back to the 15th century and is a forerunner of the 
"Taming of the Shrew." It tells how a hen-pecked 
husband subdues his nagging wife. "Fantasio," a 
play of two acts and an atmosphere of the Eighteenth 
century, relates the adventures of a young man-about- 
town who turns court jester to escape his creditors 
and saves the heroine (a princess) from a politically 
expedient but distasteful marriage. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
JAZZ CONCERT-DISCUSSION 

Professor Richard Trevarthen, visiting lecturer in 
the Music Department, will lead a discussion on ' ' The 
Blues and Their Effect on Later Jazz Trends" on 
Sunday, April 19th at 2 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building. Assisting in the "concert-discus- 
sion" will be the Frank Bennett Quartet. 



MEETING OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 

CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN 

ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF FRENCH 

The North Carolina chapter of the American Asso- 
ciation of Teachers of French will hold its annual 
spring meeting on the Duke campus on Saturday, 
April 18th from 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. The schedule 
will be as follows : 

9:00- 9:30 a.m. Registration in Page Lobby 
9:30-10:15 a.m. Paper by Professor James R. Price, Appa- 
lachian State Teachers ' College : ' ' Teach- 
er Education and Certification" 
10:15-10:45 a.m. Coffee in Flowers Lounge 
10:45-11:30 a.m. Panel Discussion on the teaching of litera- 
ture with Professor Clifton Cherpack 
presiding. 
11:30 a.m. Business Meeting 

1:00 p.m. Luncheon in Old Trinity Room 



JOINT GLEE CLUBS CONCERT 

The Duke University Women's Glee Club and 
Men's Glee Club will give a joint concert on Satur- 
day, April 18th at 7 :30 p.m. (note time change) in 
the Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium. James Young, Act- 
ing Director of the Glee Club, will conduct with Wil- 
liam Watson as accompanist. The program will fea- 
ture sacred music including Bach and Handel, folk 
songs from various countries, and "Frostiana," selec- 
tions of the poetry of Robert Frost set to music by 
Randall Thompson. Tickets priced at $1.00 (75^ ad- 
vance sale) are available in 210 Flowers Building. 



TRIANGLE COFFEE HOUSE 
PRODUCTION 

The Triangle Coffee House Players will present 
another original play, "The Plums Are Purple, Not 
Violet," by Ed Kenestrick of Chapel Hill, Sunday, 
April 12th at 9 :30 p.m. at the Triangle Coffee House, 
1205 Duke University Road. Also featured at the 
Coffee House is an exhibition of paintings by Katie 
Yelverton of Chapel Hill and of photographs by 
Charles David Knox of Durham. 



DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
JOHN BROWNING, PIANIST 

The final performance of the Duke University 
Artists Series will be the concert by John Browning, 
brilliant young American pianist, at 8 :15 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium. Remaining tickets, priced at $2.50 and 
$2.00 are available in 202-A Flowers Building or by 
calling extension 2911. 

Sponsored by the Student Union 's Fine Arts Com- 
mittee, a seminar will again precede the Artists Series 
performance by John Browning at 7 :00 p.m. in Room 
208 Flowers Building. The public is cordially invited 
to attend. : 

John Browning has been hailed "a meteor that 
crashed onto the musical scene" (New York Herald 
Tribune, 1960), and these words explain why within 
the span of seven years, this pianist has become an 
international' star. Mr. Browning is- the recipient of 
three famous competition prizes: the Steinway Cen- 
tennial Award, sponsored by the National Federation 
of Music Clubs; the Edgar M. Leventritt Award, 
which gave him his debut with the New York Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra under Dimitri Mitropoulos; and 



[51 



the Gold Medal Award of the Concours International 
Musical Reine Elisabeth in Brussels, perhaps the most 
celebrated of all international competitions. John 
Browning made his professional debut at the age of 
ten, playing Mozart's Coronation Concerto in a spe- 
cial concert with members of the Denver Symphony. 
Subsequently, he received his degree from the Juil- 
liard School of Music, working with the distinguished 
pedagogue, Rosina Lhevinne. 
The program follows : 

JOHN BROWNING 
Program 

I 



Pieces de Clavecin 



Fantasy in F minor, Op. 49 



II 



Sonata, Op. 26 



Preludes 



III 

INTERMISSION 
IV 



Coiiperin 
Chopin 
Barber 

Debussy 
Schumann 



Etudes Symphoniques, Op. 13 

HERBERT BARRETT MANAGEMENT 

250 West 57th Street 

New York, N. Y. 

Steinway Piano Capitol and Epic Records 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ECONOMICS LECTURE 

Professor Juanita Kreps will give the fourth in a 
series of public lectures on current economic issues 
on Monday evening, April 20th at 8 :00 p.m. in Boom 
130, Sociology and Psychology Building. Her sub- 
ject will be "Automation." The University Commu- 
nity and the public are cordially invited. 



THE ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered an- 
nually for the best piece of creative writing submitted 
by an undergraduate student at Duke University. 
First Prize— $100.00 
Second Prize— $ 50.00 

CONDITIONS 

1. The prize is open to all undergraduates, both men 
and women. 

2. Only short stories (7500-word limit), one-aet plays 
(7500-word limit), poems (200-line limit), and in- 
formal essays (5000-word limit) are eligible. 

3. Only one manuscript may be submitted by any 
contestant. 

4. All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and 
must be delivered to the English Office (325 Allen 
Building) by April 20. The author's name and 
address must appear nowhere except on a separate 
sheet placed before the manuscript. 

5. At the judges' discretion, the prize may be split 
equally between a winning prose and a winning 
poetry entry. 



GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 
A Guest Organ Recital by Dr. Gordon Wilson, 
Professor of Music at the University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro will be presented on Sunday, April 
19th at 4 :00 p.m. in the Duke University Chapel. 

Dr. Wilson took his Master of Music Degree in 
Piano under Ernst von Dohnanyi at the Florida State 
University, and the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 
from the University of Michigan. As a recitalist, Dr. 
Wilson has appeared before Regional Conventions for 
the A.G.O. in New Orleans and Charlotte and his tours 
have extended from Portland, Maine, to Miami, Flori- 
da. In addition, he has studied for three years with 
Miss Catharine Crozier on the faculty of Rollins Col- 
lege, Winter Park, Florida. The program follows: 



Prelude and Fugue in E minor 

Noel #1, in D minor 

Introduction and Toccata in G Major 

Organ Chorales 

The Old Year Now has passed away 
Comest Thou, from heaven to earth? 
Kyrie, Thou Spirit Divine 
Pastorale Jean 



Nicolaits Bruhns 

(1665-1697) 

Louis C. D'Aquin 

(1694-177l>i 

William Walond 

(1725-1770) 

J. S. Bach 
(1685-1750) 



The Nativity of our Saviour 

The Children of God 
The Angels 
Variations on a Noel 

Moderato (Theme) 

Larghetto 

Poco animato 

Vif 

Vivace 

Plus modere (Canon at the fourth and fifth) 

Vivace 

Cantabile (Canon at the second) 

Anime 

Fugato-Finale 



Jules Eoaer-Ditcasse 
(1873-1954) 
Olivier Messiaen 
(1908- ) 



Marcel Dupre 
(1886- ) 



PRINT AND DRAWING SOCIETY 
PRINT SHOP 

The Print and Drawing Society is sponsoring a 
print show from April 5th through May 4th at the 
Garden Gallery, on Highway 70. two miles east of the 
intersection of the road to the Raleigh-Durham Air- 
port. This exciting show includes prints by such con- 
temporary masters as Picasso, Baskin, Lebrun, Mother- 
well and others, and is open to the public for browsing 
and buying. The Garden Gallery is open every after- 
noon (including Sunday) from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. 



JOE COLLEGE WEEKEND 
BOB HOPE PERFORMANCE 

In conjunction with the Joe College Weekend pro- 
gram the Student Union will present "An Evening 
with Bob Hope and the Mitchell-Ruff Trio" on Fri- 
day, April 24th, at 10 :00 p.m. in the Indoor Stadium. 
General admission tickets only, priced at $2.50, will 
be on sale in the West Quadrangle beginning Monday, 
April 13th during the afternoon. Mail orders may 
be sent to Box KM, Duke Station, with a stamped 
self-addressed envelope. 



[6] 



WEEK OF 



April 19-25, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



April 19-25, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, April 19 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 

Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Eeverend Pro- 
fessor Robert E. Cushman, Dean of the Divinity 
School. Sermon : ' ' He Was Reckoned Among 
Transgressors." Broadcast over Radio Station 
WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

2:00 p.m. Jazz Concert-Lecture: Frank Bennett 
Septet and Mr. Richard Trevarthen. Music 
Room, East Duke Building. 

4:00 p.m. Guest Organ Recital : Dr. Gordon Wilson. 
University Chapel. 

8:15 p.m. French Plays. Branson Hall. 



Monday, April 20 



2:30 



4:15 



p.m. Joint Duke-U. N. C. Physics Colloquium. 
Room 265 Phillips Hall, University of North 
Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Speak- 
er: Professor Tullio Regge. 
p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. John 
Machin. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

8:00 p.m. Economics Seminar. Room 130 Sociology 
and Psychology Building. Speaker : Professor 
Juanita Kreps. 



8:15 p.m. Durham Civic Choral Society and The 
Triangle Little Symphony Concert. Alice M. 
Baldwin Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, April 21 



8:30 

10:10 

12:30- 

2:15 

2:30 

2:30 

3:30 
4:15- 
5:00 
5:00- 



a.m. Registration for The Normal and Thera- 
peutic Nutrition Program Institute. Room 208 
Flowers Building. (See special notice.) 
a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Ray C. Petry. 

■1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 
Volleyball. 

p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. George 
B. Clemans for the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry. 
Room 303 Chemistry Building. 
p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Wallace 
Clay Snipes for the Ph.D. degree in Physics. 
Room 218 Physics Building, 
p.m. High Energy Physics Seminar. Room 
120 Physics Building. Speaker: Dr. Rosaima 
Regge. 

5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

p.m. Gerontology Seminar. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. Speaker: Professor Fritz Verzar. 

6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 

Floor, Card Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Final Concert in Series: "Five Evenings 

with Iain Hamilton. Music Room, East Duke 

Building. 



Wednesday, April 22 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Professor Ray C. Petry. 
12:30 p.m. Faculty Club Meeting. Union Ballroom. 

1:30 p.m. The Final Examination of Miss Mary 
Clyde Singleton for the Ph.D. degree in 
Anatomy. Room 405 Davison Building. 

2:30 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. John 
Alden Farrell for the Ph.D. degree in Physics. 
Room 218 Physics Building. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker : Dr. Bruce 
Eberhart. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

7:00 p.m. Engineering Review Lecture. Room 139 
Engineering Building. Speaker : Professor 
V. L. Kenyon. 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club 
Meeting. Green Room, West Duke Building. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Heavens Above!" with Peter 
Sellers, Cecil Parker, and Ian Carmichael. 
Another delightful British comedy from the 
Boulting Brothers. "Devastating to the well- 
tuned bone" — N. Y. Times. ' ' Sellers gets better 
and better" — Time Magazine. 

8:15 p.m. Department of Music Senior Recital: 
Peter Hellnian. Music Room, East Duke 
Biulding. 



Thursday, April 23 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Miss Barbara Zikmund. 
1:00-2:00 p.m. Registration for Folklore Conference. 

Flowers Lounge. (See special notice.) 
1:30 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Wilber 

Clarence Stewart for the Ph.D. degree in 

Electrical Engineering. Room 132 Engineering 

Building. 
2 :00 p.m. Physiology Seminar. Room M-204 Davi- 
son Building. Speaker: Dr. John V. Evans. 
2 :30 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Granvil C. 

Kyker, Jr., for the Ph.D. degree iu Physics. 

Room 218 Physics Building. 
4:00 p.m. Joint Duke-U.N.C. Philosophy Colloquia. 

Room 211 A West Duke Building. Speaker: 

Professor Stephan Korner. 
4:30 p.m. University Faculty Meeting. Room 111 

Biological Sciences Building. 
5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 



5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Initiation. D Room, 
West Campus Dining Halls. 

6:00 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Dinner and Lecture. 
Union Ballroom. Speaker : Dr. Willard Thorp. 

7:30 p.m. International Law Program. Courtroom, 
Law School. Speaker: Mr. Jamal Sa'd. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Friday, April 24 



9:00 

9:00 

10:10 

11:30 



1:00 
2:30 



3:00 
3:00 
4:00 

4:15 

5:00 



7:00 
7:30 
8:00 

10:00 



a.m. Final examination of Mr. James W. 
O'Leary for the Ph.D. degree in Botany. 
Room 140 Biological Sciences Building. 
a.m. Final examination of Mr. Maximo J. 
Cerame- Vivas for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology. 
Room 225 Biological Sciences Building, 
a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Ray C. Petry, Mr. Robert Van Hook, 
and Mr. Karl L. Bucey. 

a.m. Final examination of Mr. George Adam 
Schultz for the Ph.D. degree hi Zoology. Room 
225 Biological Sciences Building. 
p.m. Golf: Duke vs. University of Maryland, 
p.m. Final examination of Mr. Gordon Edward 
Baird for the Ph.D. degree in Phvsics. Room 
218 Physics Building, 
p.m. Tennis: Duke vs. X. C. State. 
p.m. Baseball : Duke vs. Clemson. 
p.m. Joe College Parade. Buchanan and Main 
Streets. 

6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 
6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

p.m. Hoof 'n ' Horn : ' ' Can-Can. ' ' Page Audi- 
torium. 

p.m. Bowling for Faculty and their families 
at Sportland. Regular Rates Apply, 
p.m. Joint Duke-U.N.C. Philosophv Colloquia. 
213 Caldwell Hall, University of North Caro- 
lina, Chapel Hill. Speaker: Professor Stephan 
Korner. 

p.m. Bob Hope and the Mitchell-Ruff Trio. 
Indoor Stadium. 



Saturday, April 25 

12:00 noon. Box Luncheon. West Quadrangle. 

1 :30 p.m. Lawn Concert with Serendipity Singers 
and Fred Smoot. West Quadrangle. 

2:00 p.m. U.S.C. Baseball. 

2:00 p.m. Varsitv Lacross: Great Grads Day. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof V Horn: "Can-Can." Page Audi- 
torium. 



[2] 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Supper followed by worship and 
seminar. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 .45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 
EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday (Easter III), 9:30 A.M., Holy Communion. 
Tuesday, 5 :15 P.M., Inquirer's Class. Wednesday, 
7 :10 A.M., Holy Communion. Thursday, 5 :30 P.M., 
Holy Communion. Friday, 4:00 P.M., Seminar on 
Christianity and Modern Man. Saturday (St. Mark), 
7 :10 A.M., Holy Communion. 

The following persons will serve as the Episcopal 
University Council for the next year: Chairman, 
Michael A. Bryant; Vice-Chairman, Robert T. Hyde, 
Jr. ; Secretary, Libba Barnett ; Treasurer, Claude A. 
Lavarre. The other members of the Council are: 
Tempe Brownell, Susan Kauffman, James G. Rich- 
ardson and John Hines. 

On Thursday, May 7 (Ascension Day), at 5:30 
P.M., the Episcopal Bishop of North Carolina will 
make his annual visit to the Episcopal University 
Center for the Service of Baptism, Confirmation and 
Holy Communion. There will be a picnic following 
the service. All persons in the University community 
are cordially invited to attend. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R. Patton) : Monday, 5:30 P.M., Men's 
Graduate Center, Supper meeting to be followed by 
discussion of Christianity and Capitalism. 
METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, 9:00 
A.M., Honest to God Seminar. Snack breakfast fol- 
lowed by discussion session. 6 :00 P.M., Service of 
Evening Prayer. Thursday, 5 :30 P.M., Men's Gradu- 
ate Center, Social Legislation Seminar. Dr. Donald 
Roy, Sociology Department, will speak on, "Cyber- 
nation and Automation. ' ' Bring supper tray to small 
dining room. The University community is invited. 
PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., Politics and Religion 
Symposium (sponsored by the Westminster Fellow- 
ships of N. C. State College, U. N. C. and Duke). 
Supper will be followed at 6 :30 P.M. by the last of 
three sessions of the symposium, entitled, "Christians 
and Party Politics." The Moderator will be: Rev. 
Charles Johnson. Participants are: Senator John R. 
Jordan of Wake County (Democrat) and Representa- 
tive William Osteen of Guilford County (Republican). 
UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., Supper 
with the Westminster Fellowship at the Pres. Student 
Center on Alexander Street. Following supper the 
group will share in the program "Christians and 
Party Politics." Thursday, 12:40 P.M., Luncheon at 
Gilbert-Addoms. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor Robert E. Cushman, Dean 
of the Divinity School, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on 
Sunday, April 19th, in the University Chapel. His 



subject will be "He Was Reckoned Among Trans- 
gressors. ' ' 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, April 26th, is the Reverend Dr. Colin W. 
Williams, Executive Director of the Department of 
Evangelism of the National Council of Churches of 
Christ in the U.S.A. 



JAZZ CONCERT-LECTURE 

A Concert-Lecture by the Frank Bennett Septet 
and Mr. Richard Trevarthen, visiting lecturer in the 
Duke Music Department, will be presented on Sunday, 
April 19th at 2 :00 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. The Session will open with a short discus- 
sion by Mr. Trevarthen on the subject, ' ' The Blues and 
Their Effect on Later Jazz Trends," with short musi- 
cal illustrations by the Frank Bennett Quartet and 
Septet, including original compositions by both Mr. 
Bennett and Mr. Trevarthen. 

Mr. Trevarthen, Duke '55, is currently a visiting 
lecturer in the Duke Music Department. He has re- 
ceived his masters degree from the University of 
Michigan, and plans next year to pursue studies for 
his doctorate. He is presently studying composition 
with Iain Hamilton, Mary Duke Biddle Professor, and 
has had several works performed here recently. 
Also studying with Mr. Hamilton is Frank Bennett, 
jazz and classical percussionist and leader of the Duke 
Ambassadors. Members of Mr. Bennett's Septet are: 
James Crawford, tenor; John Kiolkowski, Trumpet; 
Lyman Hammond, trombone ; Walt Smith, baritone 
sax; Harrison Register, guitar; and Clarence Boyd, 
bass. 



JOINT DUKE-U.N.C. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM 

The Joint Duke-U/.N.C. Physics Colloquium will 
meet Monday, April 20th at 2:30 p.m. in Room 265 
Phillips Hall, University of North Carolina. Pro- 
fessor Tullio Regge of the University of Turin, Italy, 
and the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton Uni- 
versity, Princeton, New Jersey, will speak on 
' ' Topology and Feynman 's Amplitude. ' ' 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Zoology Department will hold its weekly semi- 
nar on Monday, April 20th, in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Dr. John 
Machin, Department of Zoology, University of 
Toronto, will speak on ' ' The Aerodynamics of Snails : 
A Study of Water Loss in Moist Skinned Animals." 
Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4 :00. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Wallace Clay Snipes 
for the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held on 
Tuesday, April 21st, at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 218 Physics 
Building. The subject of Mr. Snipes' dissertation is 
"Free Radicals and Paramagnetic Ions in Biological 
Systems." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Walter Gordy, Dwight Saylor, 
Horst Meyer, and Leonard Carlitz. Professor Gordy 
will preside. 



[3 



GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 
A Guest Organ Recital by Dr. Gordon Wilson, 
Professor of Music at the University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro will be presented on Sunday, April 
19th at 4 :00 p.m. in the Duke University Chapel. 

Dr. Wilson took his Master of Music Degree in 
Piano under Ernst von Dohnanyi at the Florida State 
University, and the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 
from the University of Michigan. As a recitalist, Dr. 
Wilson has appeared before Regional Conventions for 
the A.G.O. in New Orleans and Charlotte and his tours 
have extended from Portland, Maine, to Miami, Flori- 
da. In addition, he has studied for three years with 
Miss Catharine Crozier on the faculty of Rollins Col- 
lege, Winter Park, Florida. The program follows: 
Prelude and Fugue in E minor Nicolaus Bruhns 

(1665-1697) 
Noel #1, in D minor Louis C. D'Aquin 

(1694-1772) 
Introduction and Toccata in G Major William Walond 

(1725-1770) 
Organ Chorales J. S. Bach 

(1685-1750) 
The Old Year Now has passed away 
Comest Thou, from heaven to earth? 
Kyrie, Thou Spirit Divine 
Pastorale Jean Jules Boger-Ducasse 

(1873-1954) 
The Nativity of our Saviour Olivier Messiaen 

(1908- ) 
The Children of God 
The Angels 
Variations on a Noel Marcel Dupre 

(1886- ) 
Moderato (Theme) 
Larghetto 
Poco animato 
Vif 
Vivace 

Plus modere (Canon at the fourth and fifth) 
Vivace 

Cantabile (Canon at the second) 
Anime 
Fugato-Finale 



NORMAL AND THERAPEUTIC NUTRITION 
PROGRAM INSTITUTE MEETING 

The Normal and Therapeutic Nutrition Program 
Institute, sponsored by the Diet Therapy Section of 
the North Carolina Dietetic Association will hold a 
three day meeting at Duke University on Monday, 
April 20th through Wednesday, April 22nd. The 
theme of the conference will be "Therapeutic Dieti- 
tian, Scientist and Practitioner." Speakers will in- 
clude: Dr. Robert E. Shank, M.D., Professor of 
Preventive Medicine, Washington University School 
of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri ; Dr. A. Hughes 
Bryan, M.D., Professor of Public Health Nutrition, 
U.N.C. School of Public Health, Chapel Hill: Dr. 
Fritz Verzar, Professor, Institute for Experimental 
Gerontology, Basel, Switzerland ; Mrs. Mary Kenney, 
Dietitian, N. C. Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill; Dr. 
Charles E. Mengel, M.D., Associate in Medicine, Duke 
University Medical Center ; and Dr. Naomi Albanese, 
Ph.D., Dean, School of Home Economics, University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro. 



ECONOMICS LECTURE 

Professor Juanita Kreps will give the fourth in a 
series of public lectures on current economic issues 



on Monday evening, April 20th at 8 :00 p.m. in Room 
130 Sociology and Psychology Building. Her sub- 
ject will be "Automation." The University Commu- 
nity and the public are cordially invited. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. George B. Clemans for 
the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry will be held on Tues- 
day, April 21st, at 2:15 p.m. in Room 303 Chemistry 
Building. The subject of Mr. Clemans' dissertation is 
"I. Some Reactions of the 9,10-Dihydrodicyclopenta- 
diene Oxides. II. The Sereocheinistry of Some 1- and 
2-Substituted Dicyclopentadiene Derivatives." The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Pelham Wilder, C. K. Bradsher, C. R. 
Hauser, Jacques C. Poirier, and Norman Kirshner. 
Professor Wilder will preside. 

DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY AND THE 
TRIANGLE LITTLE SYMPHONY CONCERT 

The Durham Civic Choral Society and the Triangle 
Little Symphony will present Joseph Haydn's The 
Seasons on Monday, April 20th at 8:15 p.m. in the 
Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium. 



HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS SEMINAR 
There will be a High Energy Physics Seminar on 
Tuesday, April 21st at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 120 Physics 
Building. Dr. Rosanna Regge of Penn-Princeton 
Proton Synchrotron, Princeton, New Jersey will speak 
on the topic "K+ Leptonic Decays." 

GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Duke University Council on Gerontology will 
hold a seminar on Tuesday, April 21st at 5 :00 p.m. in 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Professor Fritz Verzar, 
Director, Institut fur Experimentelle Gerontologie, 
Basel, Switzerland, will speak on "The Role of Ex- 
perimental Biological Research in Gerontology." The 
public is cordially invited to attend. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Alden Farreli 
for the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held on 
Wednesday, April 22nd, at 2:30 p.m. in Room 218 
Physics Building. The subject of Mr. Farreli 's 
dissertation is "Neutron Resonances in the Nickel 
Isotopes and Other Intermediate Nuclei." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Henry W. Newson, Horst Meyer, Eugene 
Greiding, and T. M. Gallic, Jr. Professor Newson 
will preside. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Miss Mary Clyde Single- 
ton for the Ph.D. degree in Anatomy will be held on 
Wednesday, April 22nd, at 1 :30 p.m. in Room 405 
Davison Building. The subject of Miss Singleton's 
dissertation is "Distribution of the Optic Fibers in 
the Cat." The committee to conduct, the examination 
consists of Professors Talmage Peele, F. G. Hall, J. E. 
Markee, I. T. Diamond, and R. F. Becker. Professor 
Peele will preside. 



[4] 



FINAL CONCERT IN SERIES 
"FIVE EVENINGS WITH IAIN HAMILTON" 

The Department of Music will present the final 
program in the current series of ' ' Five Evenings with 
Iain Hamilton" on Tuesday, April 21st at 8:15 p.m. 
in the Music Room, East Duke Building. The pro- 
gram will consist of a workshop concert featuring 
three Duke University composers who have studied 
with Mr. Hamilton — Richard Trevarthen, a graduate 
of the class of '55 who is currently filling a one-year 
appointment as Visiting Lecturer in the Music Depart- 
ment; Phillip Rhodes, a graduate of '62 who is cur- 
rently pursuing the Master 's Degree in Music at Yale 
University ; Frank Bennett III, a member of the class 
of '64. Participants in the program will be students 
and faculty members of the University. Mr. Hamil- 
ton, Mary Duke Biddle Professor of Music, will 
comment on the works performed. The University 
Community and the general public are cordially in- 
vited to attend. The program will be as follows : 
String Quartet (1963) Richard Trevarthen 

Andante 
Allegro 
Adagio 

Allegro giocoso 
Presto 
Andante 

Joseph Pepper, Violin 

Tom Lowe, Violin 

Lawrence Wallace, Viola 

Barbara Pepper, Cello 

Suite No. 2 For Five Winds (1962) Phillip Rhodes 

I Prelude 

Drammatico: Sustinuto and Allegro leggiero 
II Sarabande 
Moderato 
III Gigue 

Allegro giocoso 

Peter Hellman, Flute 

Barry Hannegan, Oboe 

Allan Bone, Clarinet 

Steve Seawright, French Horn 

James Henry, Bassoon 

Sextet (1963) Frank Bennett III 

Slowly — Allegro 

Adagio 

Joseph Pepper, Violin 
Barbara Pepper, Cello 
Nancy Githens, Flute 
Allan Bone, Clarinet (Bass Clarinet) 
Steve Seawright, French Horn 
James Henry, Bassoon 



FACULTY CLUB MEETING 

The Faculty Club's last luncheon meeting of the 
year will be held on Wednesday, April 22nd, at 12 :30 
p.m. in the Union Ballroom. The Mary Duke Biddle 
Foundation will present a panel discussion on the 
present and projected activities of the Foundation. 
Cost of the luncheon will be the usual $1.25. Please 
RSVP to Mr. Hilburn Womble's office. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
April 22nd at 4:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Bruce Eberhart, 
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro, will speak on the "Genetic Control of 
Cellulase and B-Glucoside Decomposition by Neuro- 
spora." 



Professor Eberhart is a native of California and a 
graduate of San Jose State and Stanford University. 
His doctoral thesis, The Biochemical Genetics of 
Thiamine Metabolism in Neurospora, set the general 
theme for two publications with E. L. Tatum. Fol- 
lowing graduate studies, he served as an Instructor 
and Assistant Professor at Princeton University and 
currently is Chairman at Greensboro. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4:00 
p.m. 

ENGINEERING REVIEW LECTURE 

The Engineering Review Lecture will be held on 
Wednesday, April 22nd in Room 139 Engineering 
Building, at 7 :00 p.m. Professor V. L. Kenyon will 
lecture on Thermodvnamics. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Gordon Edward 
Baird for the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held on 
Friday, April 24th, at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 218 Physics 
Building. The subject of Mr. Baird 's dissertation is 
"An Investigation into Operator Structures on SU n 
with Application to a Generalization of the Racah- 
Wigner Angular Momentum Calculus. ' ' The commit- 
tee to conduct the examination consists of Professors 
L. C. Biedenharn, Eugene Greuling, Horst Meyer, and 
Richard A. Scoville. Professor Biedenharn will pre- 
side. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. George Adam Schultz 
for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology will be held on Fri- 
day, April 24th, at 11 :30 a.m. in Room 225 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Schultz 's dis- 
sertation is "Taxonomy and Ecology of Some Ameri- 
can Terrestrial Isopods (Oniscoidea)." The commit- 
tee to conduct the examination consists of Professors 
I. E. Gray, Wanda S. Hunter, R. J. Menzies, J. S. 
Roberts, and T. W. Johnson. Professor Johnson will 
preside. 

JOE COLLEGE WEEKEND 

This year's theme for Duke's annual spring week- 
end is "Joe College Goes Continental." The festivi- 
ties will get underway on Friday, April 24th, at 4 :00 
p.m. with the parade passing the East Campus Wall 
on Buchanan Boulevard and Main Street, The after- 
noon athletic events include competitions in golf with 
the University of Maryland, baseball with Clemson, 
and a tennis match with North Carolina State. 

A full evening of entertainment begins with a 
seven o'clock curtain for the annual Hoof 'n' Horn 
musical comedy, Cole Porter's "Can-Can" and fol- 
lowed by an Indoor Stadium appearance of Bob Hope 
and Gloria de Haven and the Mitchell-Ruff Trio at 
10 :00 p.m. On Saturday, the Serendipity Singers and 
comedian Fred Smoot will provide entertainment for 
the box luncheon aud lawn concert in the West Quad- 
rangle. A baseball game with the University of South 
Carolina and the Varsity Lacrosse Great Grads Day 
will begin at 2 :00 p.m. A second performance of 
"Can-Can" and individual group parties will con- 
clude the dav's activities. 



[5] 



Sunday's schedule includes the University Service 
of Worship in the Chapel with Dr. Colin W. Williams 
of the National Council of Churches as preacher, and 
Open House will be kept by the Fraternity Sections 
beginning at 2 :00 p.m. 

Tickets for all events are on sale on the campus, 
and in Page Box Office. 

Lawn Concert (Serendipity Singers) — $1.50 per 
person. 

Bob Hope— Mitchell-Ruff Trio— $2.50 per person. 
Both events — $7.00 per couple. 



HOOF 'N' HORN PRESENTS "CAN-CAN" 
Hoof 'n' Horn will present Cole Porter's musical 
comedy, "Can-Can" on Friday evening at 7:00 p.m. 
and on Saturday evening at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Audi- 
torium. The famous musical, which concerns itself 
with Paris in the 1890 's and the Can-Can dancers' 
fiery conflicts with the gendarmes, includes such 
famous songs as "I Love Paris," "It's Just One of 
Those Things," and others. The director is Carol 
Jennings, '64 ; producer, Sally Hall, '65 ; Musical Di- 
rector, James Henry of the Department of Music ; and 
choreographer, Caroline Kraus. Special features will 
be the dancing chorus of twenty, and a group of 
twenty-five singers. Curtain time is 7 :00 p.m. on Fri- 
day night so that guests may see the Bob Hope show 
at 10:00 p.m. Saturday's performance is scheduled 
for 8 :15 p.m. Tickets are on sale every afternoon in 
Page Box Office; all seats reserved at $1.75, $1.30, 
and $1.25. 

STUDENT UNION 
PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST 

The Fine Arts Committee of the Student Union 
announces the 1963- '64 Student Union All Campus 
Photographic competition-exhibition. The exhibit 
may be viewed in the Alumni Lounge, West Union 
Building through the end of the month. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
DUKE MEDICAL CENTER— "FOXGLOVE" 

An original musical comedy, "Foxglove," will be 
presented by members of the Duke Medical Center. 
Friday, May 1st at 8 :30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 
Written by Wayne Barker and produced by Herb 
Goldman, "Foxglove," is a "witty satire on medi- 
cine," and suitable entertainment for the entire 
family. Reserved seats, priced at $1.00 are on sale in 
the Medical School lobby from 10 :30 a.m. through 
1 :30 p.m. Tickets will also be available April 27th 
through 30th in the Page Box Office, or bv calling 
681-0111, extension 2911. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
INTERNATIONAL CLUB PICNIC 

The International Club will have a picnic in the 
William B. Umstead State Park on Sunday, April 
26th at 3 :00 p.m. The cost will be 50(? per person 
and reservations should be made through the Inter- 
national Student Office, 207-A Flowers Building, ex- 
tension 2767. Transportation will be provided for 
those requesting it. All interested persons are wel- 
come. 



THE ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered an- 
nually for the best piece of creative writing submitted 
by an undergraduate student at Duke University. 
First Prize— $100.00 
Second Prize— $ 50.00 

CONDITIONS 

1. The prize is open to all undergraduates, both men 
and women. 

2. Only short stories (7500-word limit), one-act plays 
(7500-word limit), poems (200-line limit), and in- 
formal essays (5000-word limit) are eligible. 

3. Only one manuscript may be submitted by any 
contestant. 

4. All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and 
must be delivered to the English Office (325 Allen 
Building) by April 20. The author's name and 
address must appear nowhere except on a separate 
sheet placed before the manuscript. 

5. At the judges' discretion, the prize may be split 
equally between a winning prose and a winning 
poetry entry. 

ADVANCE NOTICE 
CHANCEL SINGERS CONCERT 

The Chancel Singers of Duke University will pre- 
sent their annual concert on Sunday, April 26th at 
4 :00 p.m. in Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium. The pub- 
lic is cordiallv invited to attend. 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this siunmer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows : 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — Xew Tork 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC — Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 

JOINT DUKE-UNC 
PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIA 

Professor Stephan Korner of the University of 
Bristol will be the guest of the Philosophy Depart- 
ments at Duke and the University of North Carolina 
Thursday, April 23rd and Friday, April 24th. He will 
speak at Duke in Room 211A West Duke Building at 
4:00 p.m. on April 23rd on the topic "Some Objec- 
tions to Deductivism as a Philosophy of Science." On 
the 24th, through the kindness of the Leonard Nelson 
Foundation, he will speak in 213 Caldwell Hall at 
8:00 p.m. on "Leonard Nelson: A Modern Kantian." 
Interested members of the University Community are 
invited. 



[6] 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 
SENIOR RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a senior 
recital by Peter Hellman, flute, on Wednesday, April 
22nd at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. Mr. Hellman is a student of Mark Thomas 
of "Washington, D. C. He will be accompanied at 
the harpsichord and piano by Ruth Friedberg of the 
Department of Music. The University Community 
and the general public are cordially invited to attend. 
The program will be as follows : 

Overture from the Suite in A minor Georg Philipp Tellemann 
Suite for Flute and Piano Ernst Krenek (1954) 

I. Andante 
II. Allegretto moderate 

III. Andante con moto 

IV. Allegro vivace 

Sonata in E -flat major Johaun Sebastian Bach 

Allegro moderato 
Siciliano 
Allegro 

Intermission 
Syrinx Claude Debussy (1913) 

Piece Jacques Ibert 

Suite Paysanne Hongroise Bela Bart6k 

I. Chants populaires tristea 
II. Scherzo 
III. Vieilles danses 

FOLKLORE CONFERENCE 

The American Folklore Society, the North Caro- 
lina Folklore Society, the Duke University Press and 
the Graduate English Club will sponsor a Folklore 
Conference, to meet Thursday, April 23rd through 
Saturday, April 25th at Duke University. All ses- 
sions are open to the public without charge. Those 
wishing to make reservations for the banquet are re- 
quested to contact Mr. John H. Langley, Duke Uni- 
versity Press before the event. The program follows : 
THURSDAY, APRIL 23 

(1:00-2:00) Information center and forgathering place, 

Flowers Lounge 
(2:00-4:15) 208 Flowers Building 

WELCOME. Douglas M. Knight, President, Duke 

University 
BALLAD— FOLK TRADITION AND ART 
Presiding: Arthur Palmer Hudson, University of 
North Carolina 

1. "Toward a Literary History of the Ballad" 

David C. Fowler, University of Washington 

2. "John Henry in Jamaica" 

MacEdward Leach, University of Pennsylvania 

3. "The Ballad of Floyd Eddins" 

Mary Celestia Parler, University of Arkansas 

4. "Folklore and Its Role in the Tales of Bonaventure des 

Periers" J. W. Hassell, Jr., University of Georgia 

5. "Monument or Tomb? Some Thoughts on Folk Music as 

Preserved in Art Music" Wilton Mason, University 
of North Carolina 

6. "Structural Analysis in Literature and Folklore" 

Butler Waugh, University of Florida 
(7:00-9:15) 208 Flowers Building 
SONG— FOLK MUSIC 
Presiding: Thelma James, Wayne State University 

1. " Kalinda: Song of the Stick-Fighting Troubadours of 

Trinidad" Jacob Elder, University of Pennsylvania 

2. "Child 117: A Gest of Rooyn Bode"' 

William E. Simeone, Southern Illinois University 

3. "Two Scots Songs from the Sullivan-Beers Repertoire" 

Kenneth S. Goldstein, University of Pennsylvania 

4. "Survey of the Instrumental Music of the Southern 

Appalachians" Joan D. Moser, Brevard College 

5. "Collections of North Carolina Folk Music during the 

Past Half Century" Philip H. Kennedy, University 
of North Carolina 



6. "Folk Music Analysis and Research in Retrospect" 
Jan P. Sehinhan, University of North Carolina 
FRIDAY, APRIL 24 

(9:15-11:30) Music Room, East Duke Building, East Campus 
FOLKLORE AND MORES, SPEECH, TALES 
Presiding: MacEdward Leach, University of Penn- 
sj'lvania 

1. "Aymara Folklore and Folk Temperameut" 

Weston LaBarre, Duke University 

2. ' ' The Clever Animal Tale in African and American Negro 

Tradition ' ' J. Mason Brewer, Livingstone College 

3. ' ' Inspiration and Authority in the Development of the 

Shaker Spiritual ' ' Daniel W. Patterson, University 
of North Carolina 

4. "Status and Guilt: An Analysis of Hindu Caste Origin 

Myths" William L. Rowe, Duke University 

5. "Early Popularity of O. K." 

Richard Walser, North Carolina State College 

6. ' ' The Negro Image in Southern Literature ' ' 

Horace P. Beck, Middlebury College 
(2:00-4:30) Music Room, East Duke Building, East Campus 
IN OBSERVANCE OF A PUBLICATION 
COMPLETED 
Presiding: Ashbel G. Biice, Duke University Press 

1. "I Knew Frank C. Brown" 

W. Amos Abrams, Raleigh, N. C. 

2. ' ' Newman Ivey White as General Editor ' ' 

Marie White, Durham, N. C. 

3. "Observations of an Editor" 

Paull Baum, Duke University 

4. "The Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folk- 

lore: An Appraisal" Arthur Palmer Hudson, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

— coffee break — 

5. "Folklore and the Humanities" 

Francis Lee Utley, The Ohio State University 

6. "Revival or Decline and Fall?" 

Bertrand H. Bronson, University of California 
(7:00-9:30) Union Ballroom, Union Building, West Campus 

BANQUET 
"The Seeds of Love: A Glance at English Amatory Folk 

Song" — a talk illustrated by songs, by A. L. 

Lloyd, London, England 
SATURDAY, APRIL 25 

(9:00-12:30) Music Room, East Duke Building, East Campus 

A SESSION SPONSORED BY THE GRADUATE 

ENGLISH CLUB 

Presiding: William Jerome Mitchell, President 
I. Papers by Graduate Students, Duke University 

1. "The Story of Horn: The Ballad-Romance Prob- 

lem Reconsidered" Eric F. Taylor 

2. "John Wesley Jarvis and Paulding's Lion of 

the West" Joseph J. Arpad 

3. ' ' Ordering and Indexing Tunes in Folksong 

Scholarship" Alan A. Jabbour 
II. Panel 

1. Folklore and Literature: "Harden Taliaferro 

and the Use of Folklore by American Liter- 
ary Figures" Tristram P. Coffin, University 
of Pennsylvania 

2. Folklore and Myth : ' ' Before Myth ' ' 

Herbert Weisinger, Michigan State University 

3. Folklore and History: "Oral Tradition and 

Written History" Richard M. Dorson, Indiana 
University 

— coffee break — 
III. Songs from the North Carolina and Georgia Mountains 
— Sung by Hedy West, Los Angeles, California 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Wilber Clarence 
Stewart for the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineer- 
ing will be held on Thursday, April 23rd, at 1:30 
p.m. in Room 132 Engineering Building. The subject 
of Mr. Stewart's dissertation is "Current-Induced 
Switching in Thin-Film Superconducting Circuits." 
The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Charles R. Vail, John L. Artley, Harry A. 



[7] 



Owen, Jr., and Horst Meyer, 
side. 



Professor Vail will pre- 



PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology, Duke University 
Medical Center, will hold a seminar on Thursday, 
April 23rd at 2:00 p.m. in Room M-204 Davison 
Building. Dr. John V. Evans, Department of Physi- 
ology, New York State Veterinary College, Cornell 
University will speak on the subject: "Some Implica- 
tions — Physiological and Applied — of Inherited Indi- 
viduality. ' ' 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Granvil C. Kyker, Jr. 
for the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held on Thurs- 
day, April 23rd, at 2:30 p.m. in Room 218 Physics 
Building. The subject of Mr. Kyker 's dissertation is 
"Proton Resonances in Intermediate Nuclei." The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Henry W. Newson, Walter Gordy, Eugene 
Greuling, and Thomas M. Gallie, Jr. Professor New- 
son will preside. 

MEETING OF THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

The University Faculty will meet in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building on Thursday, April 23rd 
at 4 :30 p.m. The agenda will include a report to the 
Faculty by President Knight. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 
SPRING MEETING AND PUBLIC LECTURE 

The annual spring initiation, dinner, and public 
lecture of Phi Beta Kappa will take place on Thurs- 
day, April 23rd. The initiation will begin at 5 :30 
p.m. in the D Room, "West Campus Dining Halls. 
The dinner will begin at 6 :00 p.m. in the Union Ball- 
room. The lecture, also in the Ballroom, will be given 
by Dr. Willard Thorp, Holmes Professor of Belles 
Lettres and Chairman, Department of English, 
Princeton University. The subject of Dr. Thorp's lec- 
ture will be "The Struggle for Excellence in a Democ- 
racy." The lecture will be open to the public. Mem- 
bers must make or cancel reservations for the dinner 
before noon on April 23rd. 

INTERNATIONAL LAW PROGRAM 

Mr. Jamal Sa'd, Director of the Arab Informa- 
tion Center in Washington, will speak on the topic : 
"Who's Right in the Arab-Israeli Border Dispute?" 
in the courtroom of the Law School at 7 :30 p.m. on 
Thursday, April 23rd. Mr. Sa'd, a well-known lec- 
turer on the Arab viewpoint in world affairs, will 
speak under the auspices of the Duke International 
Law Society. The entire Duke Community is invited 
to attend and join in the coffee-hour discussion fol- 
lowing his address. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James W. O'Leary 
for the Ph.D. degree in Botany will be held on Fri- 
day, April 24th, at 9 :00 a.m. in Room 140 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. O'Leary 's dis- 



sertation is "Exudation from Root Systems of Woody 
Plants." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Paul J. Kramer, Aubrey W. 
Naylor, Harold S. Perry, Jane Philpott, and Calvin 
L. Ward. Professor Kramer will preside. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Maximo J. Cerame- 
Vivas for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology will be held on 
Friday, April 24th, at 9 :00 a.m. in Room 225 Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Cerame- 
Vivas' dissertation is "The Distributional Pattern of 
Beuthic Invertebrates of the Continental Shelf off 
North Carolina." The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors I. E. Gray, J. D. 
Costlow, R. J. Menzies, K. M. Wilbur, and H. J. 
Humm. Professor Gray will preside. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

Spring Semester 1964 

ANY STUDENT WISHING TO PETITION FOR RELIEF 
FROM THREE EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR 
HOURS OR TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME 
MUST REPORT TO HIS DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER 
THAN APRIL 24, 1964, TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN 
SCHEDULE. 

Thursday 

May 14 7:00- 8:00 p.m. Physical Education 

Friday 
May 15 



Reading Period No Examination Scheduled 



Saturday 
May 16 



9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 



TTS 3 
Economics 52 



Monday 
May 18 



9:00-12:00 noon 
2:00- 5:00 p.m. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. 



MWF 2 
Physics 2, 42 
Botany 2 



Tuesday 9:00-12:00 noon TTS 1 
May 19 2:00- 5:00 p.m. French and Spanish 64 

7:00-10 :00 p.m. TTS 7 & Air Science 



Wednesday 
May 20 



9:00-12 
2:00- 5 
7:00-10 



:00 noon 
:00 p.m. 
:00 p.m. 



TTS 4 
English 
MWF 1 



Thursday 9:00-12:00 noon MWF 5 & MWF 8 

May 21 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Naval Science & Zoology 2 

7:00-10:00 p.m. MWF 7 & Engineering 2.1-2.4 



Friday 

May 22 



9:00-12 
2:00- 5 
7:00-10 



:00 noon All Languages 2 

:00 p.m. Mathematics 21, 64, 84 

:00 p.m. Philosophy 48 



Saturday 
May 23 



9:00-12 
2:00- 5: 



00 noon 
00 p.m. 



MWF 6 & TTS 5 
TTS 2 



Monday 9:00-12:00 noon MWF 3 

May 25 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Mathematics 22, 42 

7:00-10:00 p.m. TTS 6 

Tuesday 9:00-12:00 noon Religion 2, 2X 

May 26 2:00- 5:00 p.m. MWF 4 & Engineering 2.5-2.8 

7:00-10:00 p.m. Political Science 12, 62 



Wednesday 
May 27 



9:00-12: 
2:00- 5: 



00 noon 
00 p.m. 



Chemistry 2 
History 2, 2X 



Chemistry (except Chemistry 2) and Zoology classes meet 
for examination at the time scheduled for their general lecture 
period. 

ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE FORE- 
GOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE 
PERIOD BEGINNING May 16, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
May 27, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE GIVEN 
BEFORE 9:00 a.m. May 16, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS TO BE MADE 
IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION WITHOUT THE 
APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

University Schedule Committee 



[8] 



WEEK OF 

April 26-May 2, 1964 



CALENDAR 

OF 



WEEK OF 

April 26-May 2, 1964 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, April 26 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Eecital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Colin W. Williams, Executive Director, De- 
partment of Evangelism, National Council of 
Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. Broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
3:00 p.m. International Club Picnic. William B. 

Umstead State Park. 
4:00 p.m. Chancel Singers Concert. Alice M. 
Baldwin Auditorium. 



Monday, April 27 



3:30 



p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Frank 
Eakin, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Library Conference Room, 
p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Stanislav 
Zimio for the Ph.D. degree in Romance Lan- 
guages. Room 125 Allen Building. 
p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Richard 
L. Capwell for the Ph.D. degree in English. 
Room 128 Old Biology Building, 
p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Jacques 
Berger. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 



3:30 



3:30 



4:15 



8:15 p.m. Music Department : Senior Piano Recital: 
Billie Godwin and Diana Bess Montgomery. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, April 28 



9:00 

10:10 
11:30 
12:30. 

3:30. 

4:00 

4:15- 
5:00- 
5:45 

6:15 



a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Denny 
Eugene Pilant for the Ph.D. degree in Political 
Science. Library Conference Room. 
a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Speaker: The Reverend Odell R. Reuben, 
a.m. Engineering Seminar. Room 125 Engi- 
neering Building. Speaker: Dr. W. R. Lucas. 

■1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 
Volleyball. 

5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

p.m. Committee on International Relations 
Lecture. Room 136' Social Science Building. 
Speaker : Professor William E. Scott. 

6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. Room 
208 Asbury Building. 

6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students, 
p.m. International Club Dinner Meeting. Men's 
Graduate Center. Speaker: Dr. Weston La- 
Barre. 

p.m. Student Union Boar's Head Banquet. 
Gothic Room, West Campus Union. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



7:00 p.m. Duke Sailing Club Meeting. 101 West 

Duke Building. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 

Floor, Card Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Student Organ Recital of students of Mrs. 

Mildred L. Hendrix. Methodist Student Center. 



Wednesday, April 29 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

The Reverend Henry G. Elkins, Jr. Chaplain. 

North Carolina College. 
4:00 p.m. Committee of International Relations 

Lecture. Room 136 Social Science Building. 

Speaker: Professor "William E. Scott. 
4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Room 130 

Building 9 (Old Biology Building). Speaker: 

Dr. George Sperling. 
4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium. Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker : Dr. Philip Hand- 
ler. 
5 :00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
7 :00 p.m. Engineering Review Lecture. Room 139 

Engineering Building. Speaker: Dr. A. S. 

Wood. 
7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge 

Club Meeting. Green Room, East Duke Build- 
ing. (Final Meeting) 
7:30 p.m. Bassett Lecture Series: Film-Lecture. 

Page Auditorium. Speakers: Mr. Samuel 

Goldwyn. Jr., and Dr. George Garrett. 

Thursday, April 30 

10:10 a.m. Divinitv School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. Clay H. Turner. 

3:00 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Donald 
Paul Snyder for the Ph.D. degree in Philoso- 
phy. Room 211A West Duke Building. 

4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. 

4:00 p.m. Student American Medical Association 
Lecture. Hospital Amphitheater. Speaker: 
Dr. John Reckless. 

4:15 p.m. Psychology Lecture. Room 130 Old 
Biology Building. Speaker : Professor Silvan 
Tomkins. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

6:30 p.m. School of Nursing Alumnae Association 
Banquet honoring Seniors. Holiday Inn (down- 
town). 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 



8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Young Artists Series: 
Riverside Chamber Singers. Page Auditorium. 



Friday, May 1 



10:10 

3:30 
3:30 

4:00 

4:00- 
5:00 

6:30 



a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Thor Hall and Mr. Kenneth Bohan- 
non. 

p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-204 Davison Building, 
p.m. Final Examination of William B. Hunt- 
ley for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. Library 
Conference Room. 

p.m. Committee on International Relations 
Lecture. Room 136 Social Science Building. 
Speaker: Professor William E. Scott. 
8:00 p.m. Duke Law Day Registration. Jack 
Tar Hotel. See special notice. 
6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, maj 7 also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 



p.m. Dinner Meeting of the Alumnae Council 
of Duke University Alumnae Association. 
West Campus Union. 
7:00-9:00 p.m. Marriage Seminar. Green Room, 
East Duke Building. 

7:15 p.m. First annual nursing lecture of the School 
of Nursing Alumnae Association. "Nursing 
Realities — Nursing Dimensions" by Dr. Helen 
Nahm. Biological Sciences Building. 

7:30 p.m. Bowling for Faculty and their families 
at Sportland. Regular Rates Apply. 

8:15 p.m. "Studio Opera." Branson Hall. 

8:30 p.m. Duke Medical School original musical 
production: "Foxglove." Page Auditorium. 



Saturday, May 2 



9:00 

10:30- 

11:30 
1:00 
2:00 
1:30 



8:15 
8:30 



a.m. The final examination of Mr. Kenneth 
Brown for the Ph.D. degree in Philosophy. 
Library Conference Room. 
11:45 a.m. Alumnae Council Coffee honoring 
Mrs. Douglas M. Knight and Dean M. Margaret 
Ball. Pegram House. 

a.m. Dedication of Alice M. Baldwin Audi- 
torium. Speaker : Mrs. Elspeth Davies Rostow. 
p.m. Alumnae Luncheon. Woman's College 
Union. Speaker: Dr. Douglas M. Knight, 
p.m. North Carolina Philosophical Society 
Meeting. Room 139 Social Science Building. 
3 :30 p.m. University Religious Council : Mar- 
riage Seminar. Green Room, East Duke Build- 
ing. 

p.m. Studio Opera. Branson Hall. 

p.m. Duke Medical School original musical 

production: "Foxglove." Page Auditorium. 



[2 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Supper followed by worship and 
seminar on "The Theology of Worship," to be led 
by Chaplain Jack Carroll. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 
EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9:30 A.M., Holy Communion; 7:00 P.M., 
Episcopal Faculty Dinner. Monday, 7 :30 P.M., Meet- 
ing of Episcopal University Council. Tuesday, 5 :15 
P.M., Inquirer's Class. Wednesday, 7 :10 A.M., Holy 
Communion. Thursday, 5 :30 P.M., Holy Communion. 
Friday (St. Philip and St. James), 7:10 A.M., Holy 
Communion; 3:15 P.M., Seminar on Orthodoxy. 
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R. Patton) : Sunday, 6 :30 P.M., Green Room, 
East Duke Bldg., Dialogue between the Reverend 
Robert Brohm, Grace Lutheran Church, Missouri 
Synod and the Reverend Donald W. Herb, Regional 
Secretary of the Division of College and University 
Work, National Lutheran Council. Monday, 5 :30 
P.M., Supper meeting, followed by a discussion led by 
Dr. Tom McCullough ; topic : ' ' Christianity and the 
Social Sciences." Wednesday, 7:00 A.M., Memorial 
Chapel of Duke Chapel, Communion Service. 
METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Car- 
roll ; Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sun- 
day, 9:00 A.M., Seminar: Honest to God; 6:00 P.M., 
Evening Prayer; Dialogue sermon on "The Church 
and the World. " 

Wesley Players will present William Inge's Bus 
Stop, on Saturday-Monday, May 2, 3, and 4, at 7 :45 
P.M., at the Methodist Center. Admission will be 
$1.25. Proceeds will go to Dr. Harris Proctor of the 
Political Science Dept, for the purchase of books for 
the library of the new University of Kenya, where 
he will be a visiting professor next year. The Uni- 
versity community is invited. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Sunday, 5:30 P.M., Ann Smith and her 
Chapel Hill Dancers will present an interpretation 
of the 139th Psalm, following a buffet supper. 
UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Hans Hillerbrand, 2729 Sevier 
St. ; After supper and a brief business meeting the 
group will begin a discussion of Dr. Waldo Beach's 
book, Conscience on Campus. Thursday, 12:40 P.M., 
Luncheon at Gilbert-Addoms. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Dr. Colin W. Williams, Executive 
Director, Department of Evangelism, National Council 
of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A., will deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship at 
11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, April 26th, in the University 
Chapel. The order of worship follows : 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Professor Barney L. Jones, 

Assistant Dean, Trinity College. 
Opening Organ Voluntary — ' ' Suite Medievale ' ' Jean Langlais 

Prelude 

Tiento 

Improvisation 



Choral Call to Worship — "The Lord Is in His Holy Temple" 

James Young 
Hymn— "Holy, Holy, Holy! " John B. Dykes 

The Prayer of Adoration 
The Lord's Prayer 
Anthem — ' ' My Shepherd Will Supply My Need ' ' 

Arr. by Virgil Thomson 
Scripture Lesson 
Hymn — "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name!" 

Oliver Holden 
Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayers of Confession, Thanksgiving, Intercession 

and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem— "And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth" 

from Elijah Mendelssohn 

Response — ' ' The Doxology ' ' 
Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Amen'' James Young 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Toccata Saint-Saens 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, May 3rd, is the Reverend Dr. Thor Hall, 
Assistant Professor of Preaching and Theology in the 
Divinity School. 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB PICNIC 

The International Club will have a picnic in the 
William B. Umstead State Park on Sunday, April 
26th at 3 :00 p.m. The cost will be 50^ per person 
and reservations should be made through the Inter- 
national Student Office, 207-A Flowers Building, ex- 
tension 2767. Transportation will be provided for 
those requesting it. All interested persons are wel- 
come. 



CHANCEL SINGERS CONCERT 

The Chancel Singers of Duke University will 
present their annual concert on Sunday, April 26th 
at 4 :00 p.m. in the Alice M. Baldwin Auditorium. The 
program follows : 

I. Motet VI (Psalm 117) by J. S. Bach 
II. Symphony of Psalms by Igor Stravinsky 
III. Four songs from 'The Hour Glass' by Irving Fine 
IV. Music for the Office of Tenebrae by James Young 
Soloists are: 

Sally Baker, Soprano 

Ron Steed, Baritone 

Denny White and Glenn Tyndall, Readers 

James Young, Conductor 

Ruth Phelps and Nancy Goodwin, Accompanists 

The music for Office of Tenebrae was composed in 
1960 especially for use at King's Chapel, Boston. It 
has been performed there annually on Good Friday 
ever since. The concert version to be presented by 
the Chancel Singers marks the first performance of 
this work outside of King's Chapel. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Frank Eakin, Jr. for 
the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Monday, 
April 27th at 3 :30 p.m. in the Library Conference 
Room. The subject of Mr. Eakin 's dissertation is 



[3] 



"The Relationship of Yahwism and Baalism During 
the Pre-Exilie Period." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors William Stine- 
spring, Hugh Anderson, James Price, John Strugnell, 
and Robert Rogers, Minor. Professor Stinespring will 
preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Stanislav Zimic for 
the Ph.D. degree in Romance Languages will be held 
on Monday, April 27th at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 125 
Allen Building. The subject of Mr. Zimic 's disserta- 
tion is "Cervantes, Lector de Aquiles Tacio Y de 
Alonso Nunez de R-einoso. ' ' The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors R. L. Predmore, 
Margaret Ball, Clifton Cherpack, Gifford Davis, and 
J. R. Castellano. Professor Predmore will preside. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly semi- 
nar on Monday, April 27th in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building at 4 :15 p.m. Dr. Jacques 
Berger, Department of Zoology, will speak on "The 
Ciliate Fauna of Echinoids: A Study of a Com- 
mensal Association." Coffee and tea will be served 
in the foyer. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Denny Eugene Pilant 
for the Ph.D. degree in Political Science will be held 
on Tuesday, April 28th at 9:00 a.m. in the Library 
Conference Room. The subject of Mr. Pilant 's disser- 
tation is " A Peaceful Dilemma : American Civilians 
Accompanying the Anned Forces Abroad. ' ' The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Robert S. Rankin, Robert H. Connery, J. 
Harris Proctor, John H. Hallowell, and Richard L. 
Watson, Jr. Professor Rankin will preside. 



ENGINEERING SEMINAR 

Dr. W. R. Lucas, Chief of the Materials Division of 
the Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Laboratory, 
George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Hunts- 
ville, Alabama, will be the next guest speaker in the 
1963-64 series of seminars sponsored by the Duke 
College of Engineering. He will speak in Room 125 
Engineering Building, on Tuesday, April 28th at 
11:30 a.m. The subject of Dr. Lucas' address will 
be "Materials Engineering in Rocket Systems and 
Space Vehicles." The public is invited to attend. 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB MEETING 

The International Club will have a dinner-discus- 
sion meeting on Tuesday, April 28th at 5 :45 p.m. in 
the Men's Graduate Center. Dr. Weston LaBarre, 
Professor of Anthropology, will speak on "Anthro- 
pology and Cultural Differences" at 6:30 p.m. 

All interested persons are welcome, either before 
or after dinner. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
SENIOR PIANO RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a senior 
piano recital by Billie Godwin and Diana Bess 
Montgomery on Monday, April 27th at 8 :15 p.m. 
in the Music Room, East Duke Building. Both Miss 
Godwin and Miss Montgomery are students of Loren 
Withers. The University Community and the general 
public are cordially invited to attend. The program 
will be as follows: 



Prelude and Fugue in F-flat Minor, WTC I 


Bach 


Miss Montgomery 




French Suite No. 6 in E Major 


Bach 


Allemande 




Courante 




Sarabande 




Gigue 




Miss Godwin 




Concerto in C Major, K.467 


Mozart 


First Movement : Allegro 




Miss Montgomery 




(Orchestral accompaniment by Mr. Withers) 


Sonata in E Major, Op. 109 


Beethoven 


Vivace ma non Troppo ; Adagio Espressivo 




Prestissimo 




Andante Molto Cantabile ed Espressivo 




Miss Godwin 




Nocturne in C-sharp Minor, Opus 27, No. 2 


Chopin 


Prelude from the Suite pour le piano 


Debussy 


Miss Montgomery 




Intermezzo in A Major, Opus 118, No. 2 


Brahms 


Assez modere, from ' ' Mouvements perpetuels ' ' 


Poulenc 


Miss Godwin 





COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL 

RELATIONS LECTURE 

WILLIAM E. SCOTT 

Professor William E. Scott, of the Department of 
History, will give a series of lectures on ' ' Problems of 
the origins of the Second World War" at 4:00 p.m. 
on April 28th, 29th and May 1st in Room 136 Social 
Science Building. The subjects will be: Tuesday, 
April 28th, "The Responsibility of Adolf Hitler"; 
Wednesday, April 29th, "British Policy Towards 
Hitler"; and Friday, Mav 1st, "French Policv 
Towards Hitler." 

These lectures are sponsored by the Committee on 
International Relations at Duke University whose 
function is to promote research and teaching in in- 
ternational relations and to administer a grant from 
the Ford Foundation for this purpose. 

Professor Scott has recently published his book, 
Alliance Against Hitler; the Origins of the Franco- 
Soviet Pact (Duke University Press), and is now en- 
gaged in a general studv of the origins of World War 
II. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Richard L. Capwell 
for the Ph.D. degree in English will be held on 
Monday. April 27th at 3:30 p.m. in Room 128 Old 
Biology Building. The subject of Mr. Capwell 's 
dissertation is "A Biographical and Critical Study of 
John Crowne. " The committee to conduct the exami- 
nation consists of Professors Charles E. Ward, S. K. 
Heninger, Jr., C. Richard Sanders, and Paul Welsh. 
I Professor Ward will preside. 



[4] 



DUKE SAILING CLUB MEETING 

The Duke Sailing Club will meet on Tuesday, 
April 28th in 101 West Duke Building at 7 :00 p.m. 
to elect officers for the coming school year. All 
members are urged to be present. 



STUDENT ORGAN RECITAL 
STUDENTS OF MILDRED HENDRIX 

A Student Organ Recital by students of Mrs. 
Mildred L. Hendrix, Assistant Professor of Music, 
will be presented on Tuesday evening, April 28th, at 
8 :00 p.m. in the Methodist Student Center. The Uni- 
versity Community and the general public are cordial- 
ly invited to attend. 

The program will be as follows: 

' ' We All Believe in One God, Creator ' ' 
(The Giant Fugue) 

William Trexler 
Fantasie in G Minor 

Annette Brisendine 
' ' As Jesus Stood Beside the Cross ' ' 

Susan Blount 
Variations on ' ' My Young Life 
Hath an End" 

John Simpson 
"In Thee Is Gladness" 

Jackie Ward Emlet 
Toccata from "Suite Gothique" 

J. Schmidt 
"In Death's Strong Grasp the Saviour Lay" ,/. S. Bach 

Paulino Bower 
Prelude and Fugue in E minor (the Cathedral) J. S. Bach 

Jere Farrah 
' ' Man Bewail Thy Grievous Fall " J. S. Bach 

Alice Williams 
Prelude and Fugue in G minor Dietrich Buxtehude 

Marie McClure 

Toccata Marius Monnilcendam 

Terry Scott 



J. S. Bach 
J. S. Bach 

Samuel Scheldt 

Peter SweeV/nok 
J. S. Bach 

Leon Boellmann 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Psychology Colloquium will be held on 
Wednesday, April 29th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 130 
Building 9 (Old Biology Building). Dr. George Sper- 
ling, Bell Telephone Laboratories, and Visiting Asso- 
ciate Professor in the Psychology Department for the 
spring semester, will speak on ' ' Short Term Memory. ' ' 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
April 29th at 4 :15 p.m. in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building, West Campus. Dr. 
Philip Handler of the Department of Biochemistrj r 
will speak on "Electron Transfer in Photosynthesis. " 

Professor Handler, a native of New York, received 
his B.S. degree at City College in 1936. Following 
graduate training at the University of Illinois he came 
to Duke as an instructor in Physiology and Nutrition. 
Over the years he has had a distinguished career in 
serving national organizations, including a term as 
Chairman of the Biochemistry Study Section of 
N.I.H., member of Medical Research Facilities Panel 
of N.S.F., Atomic Energy Commission, National Re- 
search Council, etc. Professor Handler is chairman 
of the Department of Biochemistry and most recently 
has been appointed to President Johnson's Scientific 



Advisory Panel. His research interests have centered 
around biological oxidations and enzyme action. 

Refreshments will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 



ENGINEERING REVIEW LECTURE 
The Engineering Review Lecture will be held on 
Wednesday, April 29th at 7:00 p.m. in Room 139 
Engineering Building. Dr. A. S. Wood will lecture 
on "Fluids." 



BASSETT LECTURE SERIES 
FILM SHOWING AND LECTURE 

On Wednesday, April 29th at 7 :30 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium, the Bassett Lecture Series Committee and 
Quadrangle Pictures will present a free pre-release, 
full length film entitled, "The Young Lovers." This 
film, based on a script written by Dr. George Garrett 
at the University of Virginia, was directed and pro- 
duced by Sam Goldwyn, Jr. 

Dr. Garrett and Mr. Goldwyn are now touring the 
country, pre-releasing this film at a number of cam- 
puses. The film will be preceded by a short lecture 
by Dr. Garrett and Mr. Goldwyn on the "Film Proc- 
ess," and followed by an open discussion of the film 
and film-making in general. 

This series of lectures on "The Young Lovers," 
which started at Princeton last year, has been very 
well received, and the discussions of it have been live- 
ly and informative. Mr. Goldwyn will probably re- 
lease the movie to the public this summer. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Donald Paul Snyder 
for the Ph.D. degree in Philosophy will be held on 
Thursday, April 30th at 3:00 p.m. in Room 211A 
West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Snyder's 
dissertation is "Causation, Predication, and Modal 
Logic." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors R. L. Clark, Charles Baylis, 
Bernard Peach, Marshall Spector, and Joseph R. Sho- 
enfield. Professor Clark will preside. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

Because of the general Faculty Meeting called for 
April 23rd, the next monthly meeting of the Aca- 
demic Council will take place one week later than 
usual, on Thursday, April 30th in Room 208 Flowers 
Building at 4:00 p.m. The agenda will include the 
following items : 

1 . Discussion of problems associated with appoint- 
ment and promotion of academic staff members, 
led by Professors W. G. Anlyan, H. A. Fair- 
bank, M. E. Hobbs, and E. C. Horn. 

2. Discussion by the Council of the report pre- 
sented by its Committee on Faculty and Staff 
Housing, Professor R. L. Watson, Jr., Chair- 
man. 

If unable to attend, please give advance notice to the 
Secretary (extension 2214; 136 Engineering Build- 
ing.) 



[5] 



STUDENT UNION— YOUNG ARTISTS 

SERIES PRESENTS "THE 
RIVERSIDE CHAMBER SINGERS" 

The Student Union 's Young Artists Series will pre- 
sent "The Riverside Chamber Singers" on Thursday, 
April 30th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Trained 
originally by Norman Lloyd of the Juilliard faculty, 
the Riverside Chamber Singers group is composed of 
six young soloists performing unaccompanied. Their 
repertoire ranges from the madrigal schools of the 
15th and 16th centuries to 20th century compositions. 
They began their group singing as a class project at 
Juilliard, an experiment which was so successful that 
the3 r were persuaded to become a professional group 
in 1958; since that time they have been received with 
great enthusiasm by both critics and the general 
public. The New York Times describes their singing 
as "a fine display of musicianship, teamwork, and just 
plain musical delight." 

Tickets are all non-reserved and are priced at $.75 
for all students, and $1.00 for others ; they are avail- 
able in 202A Flowers Building, and at the Page Box 
Office from 6 :30 p.m. on the evening of the concert. 
Included in the group are : Alan Baker, baritone ; 
Barbara Crouch, mezzo-soprano ; Eileen Laurence, 
soprano; James Bratcher, tenor; Joan Mey, soprano; 
and Anthony Tamburello, bass-baritone. The program 
follows : 



Quern vidistis pastores 

So fair ich tun 

Hosanna to the Son of David 



Richard Deering (15S0-16S0) 
Reinrich Schutz (1585-1672) 
Thomas Weellces (1575-1623) 



II 

Haiku Set (five modern madrigals on 

Japanese miniature poems) Michael Miller (1931- ) 

Art 

Temple Bell 
Cuckoo 

Summer Grass 
Yoshino 

III 
Tu m'uccidi, o crudelo Gesualdo di Venosa (1560-16S1) 

Doleissima mia vita 
Ecco Moriro Dunque (prima parte) 
Mai, gia mi discoloro (seconda parte) 
Itene o miei sospiri 

INTERMISSION 
IV 



Lady, when I behold 

Have I found her? 

The nightingale, the organ 

of delight 
The Silver Swan 
This sweet and merry month 



To the Girl With the Little 
Bean Nose 



Vamos al portal 

(Villanesea) 
Dadme albricias hijos d 'Eva 
O Magnum mysterium 
Riu, riu chiu 



John Wilbye (1574-1638) 
Thomas Bateson (1570-16S0) 

Thomas Weelkes (1575-1623) 

Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625) 

William Byrd (1543-160S) 



Thomas Wagner (1932- ) 
VI 

Francisco Guerrero (1571-1599) 
(16th century anonymous) 

Cristobal de Morales (1500-1553) 
(16th century anonymous) 



STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL 
ASSOCIATION MEETING 

An open discussion will be held by the Student 
American Medical Association on Thursday, April 



30th at 4 :00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheatre. Dr. 
John Reckless will speak on the topic, "Is Socialized 
Medicine Inevitable ? ' ' The public is cordially invited 
to attend. 



PSYCHOLOGY LECTURES 

The Department of Psychology will sponsor two 
lectures on "Reflections on the Nature of Man," by 
Professor Silvan Tomkins, Princeton University, on 
Thursday, April 30th and Thursday, May 7th. On 
April 30th Professor Tomkins will speak on "Homo 
Papiens, " and the title of his lecture on May 7th will 
be ' ' Ideology and Personality. ' ' Both lectures will be 
held in Room 130 Building 9 (Old Biology Building) 
at 4:15 p.m. 

Professor Tomkins is presently Professor of Psy- 
chology at Princeton University, having taken his de- 
gree at the University of Pennsylvania where he 
trained in both Psychology and Philosophy. Prior to 
his appointment at Princeton, he was a member of 
the Harvard faculty. His most recent work concerns 
the importance of the affective system in a theory of 
man. The public is invited to attend. 



LAW DAY— DUKE UNIVERSITY 
LAW SCHOOL 

Law Day will be held at the Duke Law School on 
Friday and Saturday, May 1st and 2nd. The program 
will feature a symposium on the topic: "Effective 
Appellate Advocacy, " including The Honorable Rob- 
ert A. Leflar of the Arkansas School of Law as mod- 
erator; Col. W. T. Joyner of Raleigh, N. C. ; The 
Honorable H. R. Medina, retired, of the Court of Ap- 
peals for the Second Circuit ; and James C. Davis of 
Cleveland, Ohio. Also featured will be the Law Day 
1964 Banquet with speaker: Arthur Dean, senior 
partner in the firm of Sullivan and Cromwell, New 
York, and representative of the U.S. at the nuclear 
test ban negotiations, speaking on the topic : ' ' Com- 
munism and the Western World." An announcement 
will be made regarding the election of one honorary 
member to Order of Coif, and the newly elected offi- 
cers of the Law Alumni Association will be recognized 
at the Banquet, Reception and dance will follow in 
the Jack Tar Hotel. The schedule of events will be 
as follows : 

Frida3 r , May 1st 

4:00-8:30 p.m. Registration at Jack Tar Hotel. 

6:30 p.m. Class of '39 — 25th Reunion Banquet, 

Schrafft's Country Inn 
Class of '54 — 10th Reunion Banquet, 

Schrafft's Country Inn. 
Reception at Law School 
Registration at the Law School 



8:30-10:00 p.m. 
9:00-10:00 p.m. 
Saturday, May 2nd 
8:30-9:30 a.m. 
9:00-12:00 noon 

10:00-12:00 noon 

12:30 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

6:00-7:00 p.m. 
7:00-9:00 p.m. 
9:30 p.m.-l:00 a.m. 



Registration at the Law School 

Symposium: "Effective Appellate Ad- 
vocacy" in the Courtroom 

Law Dames Fashion Show for all wives. 
Washington Duke Room. Jack Tar. 

Annual Luncheon Meeting Law Alumni 
Association Union Ballroom 

Duke Law School Moot Court Finals. 
Courtroom 

Reception at Jack Tar Hotel 

Banquet at Durham Civic Center 

Dance at Jack Tar Hotel 



[6] 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. William B. Huntley 
for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Fri- 
day, May 1st at 3 :30 p.m. in the Library Conference 
Room. The subject of Mr. Huntley's dissertation is 
"Christ, the Bridegroom: A Theological and Histori- 
cal Study of a Biblical Image." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Hugh 
Anderson, James Price, William Stinespring, John 
Strugnell and Robert Rogers, Minor. Professor 
Anderson will preside. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC AND 
DUKE PLAYERS— STUDIO OPERA 

The Department of Music and the Duke Players 
will present "Studio Opera," an opera workshop pro- 
duction of scenes from "The Magic Flute," "The 
Marriage of Figaro, " " The Barber of Seville, " " Han- 
sel and Gretel," and "II Trovatore" on Friday and 
Saturday, May 1st and 2nd in Branson Hall. Musical 
directors will be John Hanks and Ruth Friedberg ; 
stage directors will be Kenneth Reardon and Victor 
Michalak. Accompanists will be Ruth Friedberg, 
piano, and Frank Glass, celesta. There is no charge 
for admission, and the University Community and 
general public are cordially invited. The program will 
be as follows : 



Hansel and Gretel 

a. Act I, Scene I 

b. Act I, Scene III 

Hansel, Sally Blackwell 

Gretel, Karen Lundry 

Sandman, Nancy Temple 

II 

The Magic Flute 

Duet from Act II Finale 

Pagageno, William Stone 
Pagagena, Nancy Temple 
III 
The Marriage of Figaro 

a. Act I, Scene I 

b. Act II, Scenes I & II 

Figaro, Ronald Steed 

Susanna, Karen Lundry 

Cherubino, Sally Blackwell 

The Countess, Marjorie Randolph 

The Count, Riley Brown 

IV 

The Barber of Seville 

Act II, Scene I 

Rosina, Elizabeth Minus 

Figaro, Ronald Steed 

Dr. Bartolo, Frank Glass 

Don Basilio, Charles Smith 

Servants, Nancy Temple and 

William Stone 

V 

II Trovatore 

Act IV, ' ' Miserere Scene ' ' 

Ruiz, William Stone 

Leonora, Marjorie Randolph 

Maurico, John Hanks 



Humperdmck 



Mozart 



Mozart 



Rossini 



Verdi 



RENTAL OF ACADEMIC APPAREL 

Members of the Faculty and Staff desiring to rent 
cap, gown or hood for commencement exercises. June 
1st, should place their orders with Duke University 
Stores prior to Monday, May 11th. Delivery on 



Orders placed after this date cannot be assured. For 
information or ordering call extension 2344. 



"FOXGLOVE" 
DUKE MEDICAL CENTER PRESENTATION 

The School of Medicine will present "Foxglove," 
an original musical comedy written and directed by 
Wayne Barber, MD, '64, and produced by Herb 
Goldman, '60. The musical satire on the medical pro- 
fession is considered appropriate entertainment for 
the entire family. The only presentation of "Fox- 
glove" will be in Page Auditorium on Friday and 
Saturday, May 1st and 2nd at 8 :30 p.m. All seats are 
reserved at one dollar and a limited number of seats 
remain. Tickets may be purchased in the lobby of 
the Medical School Building from 10 :30 a.m. to 1 :30 
p.m. daily and at the Page Auditorium Box Office 
from 2 :00-5 :00 on April 27th through 30th. Reser- 
vations may also be made by calling extension 2911. 

"Foxglove," featuring 18 original songs, a small 
orchestra, is fully staged and promises to be a memo- 
rable milestone in University entertainment. 

Selected musical numbers from "Foxglove" will 
be performed on WTVD, Channel 11. Segments of 
the Ken Corbett Show at 7 :00 a.m. on Tuesday, April 
28th and a portion of the "At Home with Peggy Mann 
Show : at 1 :00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 29th will be 
devoted to selections from "Foxglove." 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Kenneth Brown for 
the Ph.D. degree in Philosophy will be held on Satur- 
day, May 2nd at 9 :00 a.m. in the Library Conference 
Room. The subject of Mr. Brown's dissertation is 
"Washington Gladden: Exponent of Social Chris- 
tianity." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Stuart Henry, Waldo Beach, 
Hans Hillerbrand, Ray Petry and John Hallowell. 
Professor Henry will preside. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND 
PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will hold a seminar 
on Friday, May 1st, at 3 :30 p.m. Dr. Annemarie 
Weber, Institute for Muscle Disease, Inc., New York, 
will speak on the subject: "The Regulation of Myofi- 
brillar Contraction bv Ca. " 



DEDICATION OF THE 

ALICE M. BALDWIN AUDITORIUM, 

EAST CAMPUS 

The Woman 's College Auditorium will be dedicated 
in memory of the late Alice M. Baldwin, first dean of 
the Woman's College, on Saturday, May 2ud, at 11 :30 
a.m. A native New Englander with degrees from Cor- 
nell and Chicago, Dr. Baldwin came to Duke in 1924 
as Dean of Women and assistant professor of history. 
As first Dean of the Woman's College, she was instru- 
mental in shaping policies giving women an equal 
status at Duke. The program will include an address 
by Elspeth Davies Rostow, Professor of History at 
American University, whose subject will be "Ideas in 



7] 



Action: 1964." Professor Emeritus of History, Wil- 
liam T. Laprade, will give a tribute to Dean Baldwin ; 
President Knight will dedicate the auditorium; and 
Professor Fmieritus of Religion, Hersey E. Spenee, 
will conclude the ceremony with a dedicatory prayer. 
The public is cordially invited to attend. 



NORTH CAROLINA PHILOSOPHICAL 
SOCIETY MEETING 

The North Carolina Philosophical Society will 
meet on Saturday, May 2nd at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 139 
Social Science Building. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will meet on Monday, May 4th, 
at 8 :00 p.m. in the Green Room, East Duke Building. 
Professor Alexander Hull of the Department of Ro- 
mance Languages will speak on ' ' The Structure of the 
Canadian French Consonant System. " Everyone is 
cordially invited. 



1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows : 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Plight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAO— Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 



STUDENT UNION 
PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST 

The Fine Arts Committee of the Student Union 
announces the 1963-64 Student Union All-Campus 
Photographic competition-exhibition. The exhibit may 
be viewed in the Alumni Lounge, West Union Build- 
ing through the end of the month. 

Awards include, in the Black and White Division : 
1st Place Frank Hughes 

2nd Place Frank Hughes 

3rd Place Barry Henline 

Five Honorable Mention Awards to : 

Barry Henline, Bruce Schlein, David L. Ray- 
field, Robert L. Kendall, and Ausonio Marras. 
In the Color Transparency Division the winners 
are: 

1st Place Robert L. Kendall 

2nd Place Joe Richardson 

3rd Place Paul Sedar 

Three Honorable Mention Awards: 
1— Robert L. Kendall 
2 — Ausonio Marras 



GERMAN EXAMINATION FOR 
CANDIDATES FOR GRADUATE DEGREES 

The German examinations for candidates for grad- 
uate degrees will be given on April 27th through Mav 
1st. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
JOSIAH C. TRENT LECTURE 

The annual Josiah C. Trent lecture in the history 
of medicine will be held on Monday, May 4th at 8 :15 
p.m. in the Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 
Dr. Charles Donald O'Malley, Ph.D. will speak on 
"Dionisio Daza Chacon, a 16th Century Spanish 
Surgeon." Dr. O'Malley is Head of the Department 
of the History of Medicine at U.C.L.A. The general 
public is cordially invited to attend. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

Spring Semester 1964 

ANY STUDENT WISHING TO PETITION FOB RELIEF 
FROM THREE EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR 
HOURS OR TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME 
MUST REPORT TO HIS DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER 
THAN APRIL 24, 1964, TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN 
SCHEDULE. 



Thursday 
May 14 



7:00- 8:00 p.m. Physical Education 



Friday 
May 15 



Reading Period No Examination Scheduled 



Saturday 
May 16 



9:00-12: 
2:00- 5: 



00 noon 
00 p.m. 



TTS 3 
Economics 52 



Monday 
May IS 



9:00-12 
2:00- 5 

7:00-10 



00 noon 
00 p.m. 
00 p.m. 



MWF 2 
Physics 2, 42 
Botany 2 



Tuesday 9:00-12:00 noon TTS 1 

May 19 2:00- 5:00 p.m. French and Spanish 64 

7:00-10:00 p.m. TTS 7 & Air Science 



Wednesday 
May 20 



9:00-12 
2:00- 5 
7:00-10 



00 noon 
00 p.m. 
00 p.m. 



TTS 4 
English 2 
MWF 1 



Thursday 9:00-12:00 noon MWF 5 & MWF 8 

May 21 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Naval Science & Zoology 2 

7:00-10:00 p.m. MWF 7 & Engineering 2.1-2.4 

Friday 9:00-12:00 noon All Languages 2 

May 22 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Mathematics 21, 64, 84 

7:00-10:00 p.m. Philosophy 48 



Saturday 
May 23 



9:00-12 
2:00- 5 



00 noon 
00 p.m. 



MWF 6 & TTS 5 
TTS 2 



Monday 9:00-12:00 noon MWF 3 

May 25 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Mathematics 22, 42 

7:00-10:00 p.m. TTS 6 

Tuesday 9:00-12:00 noon Religion 2, 2X 

May 26 2:00- 5:00 p.m. MWF 4 & Engineering 2.5-2.8 

7:00-10:00 p.m. Political Science 12, 62 



Wednesday 
May 27 



9:00-12 
2:00- 5 



00 noon 
00 p.m. 



Chemistry 2 
Historv 2, 2X 



Chemistry (except Chemistry 2) and Zoology classes meet 
for examination at the time scheduled for their general lecture 
period. 

ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE FORE- 
GOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE 
PERIOD BEGINNING Mav 16, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
May 27, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE GIVEN 
BEFORE 9:00 a.m. May 16, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS TO BE MADE 
IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION WITHOUT THE 
APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

University Schedule Committee 



[8] 



WEEK OF 



May 3-9, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



May 3-9, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, May 3 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Thor Hall. Sermon : " An Instrument of God. ' ' 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 

3:00 p.m. Guest Carillon Recital Program: Ronald 
Barnes. 

7:45 p.m. "William Inge's "Bus Stop." Methodist 
Student Center. 



Monday, May 4 



3:30 



4:15 



p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Richard 
H. Petersen for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Library Conference Room, 
p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker : Mr. Jonathan 
L. Richardson. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:30-8:30 p.m. Student Union Sidewalk Art Ex- 
hibit: Deadline for entries. Room 105 West 
Union Building. (Open to all University 
Community. ) 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

p.m. Final Meeting of University Religious 
Council. Men's Graduate Center. 



5:45 



7:45 



:00 



8:15 



8:15 



p.m. William Inge's "Bus Stop." Methodist 
Student Center. 

p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Green Room, 
East Duke Building. Speaker: Professor 
Alexander Hull. 

p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

p.m. Josiah C. Trent Lecture, Auditorium, 
Biological Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. 
Charles Donald O'Malley. 



Tuesday, May 5 



9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Student Union Sidewalk Art 

Exhibit. West Quadrangle. 
10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Professor Kenneth W. Clark. 
12:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students Volley- 
ball. 
3 :30-5 :00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 

109 Asbury Building. 
4:00 p.m. Classical Studies Lecture. Room 208 

Flowers Building. Speaker: Professor Frank 

W. Walbank. 
4:15-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main 

Floor, Card Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Sigma Xi Lecture. Biological Sciences 

Building Auditorium. Speaker: Dr. Paul M. 

Gross. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1 :00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



8:15 p.m. Music Department : Senior Piano Recital : 
Lydia Cantrell and John Holt. Music Eoom, 
East Duke Building. 

Wednesday, May 6 

9:30 a.m. Final Examination of Mrs. Margaret 
Jaeger Wallace for the Ph.D. degree in Educa- 
tion. Room 08A West Duke Building. 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Professor Kenneth W. Clark. 

11:00 a.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 
Speaker : President Douglas M. Knight. 

2 :30 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Chieu Ping 
Lee for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology. Room 
225 Biological Sciences Building. 

4:00 p.m. Classical Studies Lecture. Room 208 
Flowers Building. Speaker: Professor Frank 
W. Rathbone. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker : Mr. John Boyer. 

4:30 p.m. Joint Psychology Colloquium. Room 
130 Building 9. Speaker : Dr. Morton Deutsch. 

5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
109 Asbury Building. 

6:45 p.m. Gothic Bookshop Book and Art Auction. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"Black Like Me" A pre-release showing of a 
film based on the book of the same title 
authored by John Howard Griffin. A discus- 
sion led by the film Producer and the Psy- 
chological Consultant will immediately follow. 
(Note: One showing only) 

Thursday, May 7 

9:30 a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Anthony 
C. Fortosis for the Ph.D. degree in Education. 
Room 08A West Duke Building. 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. Wayne Smith. 

2:30 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. David E. 
Smith for the Ph.D. degree in Political Science. 
Room 201 Allen Building. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Room 114 Physics 
Building. Speaker: Dr. Reese T. Prosser. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-204 Davison Building. Speaker: Dr. 
J. J. Hermans. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Friday, May 8 



9:30 a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Lewis 
Dunbar Dove for the Ph.D. degree in Botany. 
Room 140 Biological Sciences Building. 

9:45 a.m. Joint Meeting of North Carolina Section 
of American Society of Civil Engineers. Col- 
lege of Engineering. 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

2:00 p.m. The Final Examiuatiou of Mr. James R. 
Coleman for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology. 
Room 225 Biological Sciences Building. 

3:00 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Jon 
Nelson Moliue for the Ph.D. degree in 
Philosophy. Library Conference Room. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

7:30 p.m. Bowling for Faculty and their families 
at Sportland. Regular Rates Apply. 

8:15 p.m. Music Department: Student Chamber 
Music and Organ Recital. Alice M. Baldwin 
Auditorium. 



Saturday, May 9 



10:30 



a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Philip 
Eugene Miller for the Ph.D. degree in Chem- 
istry. Room 01 Chemistry Building. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "The Seventh Seal" written and 
directed by Sweden's Ingniar Bergman. Ac- 
claimed throughout the world as one of the 
greatest films in the history of the cinema. 
' ' A piercing and powerful contemplation of the 
passage of man upon this earth" — Crowther, 
New York Times. Special prize — Cannes Film 
Festival. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
BAPTIST CENTER. (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Sunday, 1 :30 P.M., Rides leave East and West circles 
for the program at Murdoch School in Butner. 
Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Supper, followed bv seminar on 
"The Theology of Worship," led by Chaplain Jack 
Carroll. Saturday, Baptist Student Union Social 
honoring graduating seniors. Come by the Center or 
phone 286-6097 if you plan to attend. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M., East Dirke Chapel. All are welcome. 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday (Rogation Sunday). 9:30 A.M., Holy Com- 
munion. Monday (Rogation), 7:10 A.M.. Holy Com- 
munion. Tuesday (Rogation), 7:10 A.M., Holy Com- 
munion: 5:15 P.M.. Inquirers' Class. Wednesday, 



[2] 



(Rogation), 7:10 A.M., Holy Communion. Thursday 
(Ascension Day), 7:10 A.M., Holy Communion. 

There will be a service of Baptism, Confirmation 
and Choral Eucharist on Thursday at 5 :30 P.M. There 
will be a picnic following the service. All members 
of the University community are cordially invited. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R, Patton) : Sunday, 6:3.0 P.M., Green Room, 
East Duke Building, Dr. Hans Hillerbrand will speak 
on, "Luther and Problems of Social Science." Mon- 
day, 5:30 P.M., M. G. C, Supper, followed by a 
discussion of Camus' The Stranger. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, 
6 :00 P.M., Evening Prayer and Holy Communion. 
Tuesday, 1 :15 P.M., Rides leave Chapel steps and East 
circle for Methodist Center Council meeting at home 
of Jack Carroll. 

PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson): Sunday, 5:30 P.M., Buffet Supper, 
Worship and Election of Officers. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., Home 
of Dean and Mrs. Robert L. Dickens, 2717 Circle 
Drive. After supper and a brief business meeting 
the group will continue discussion of Dr. Waldo 
Beach's book Conscience on Campus. Transporta- 
tion will leave the Chapel steps and the East Campus 
circle at 5 :15 P.M. Thursday, 12 :40 P.M., Luncheon 
at Gilbert-Addoms. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Thor Hall will deliver the sermon at 
the University Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on 
Sunday, May 3rd in the University Chapel. His sub- 
ject will be "An Instrument of God." The order of 
worship follows: 

Presiding Minister: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University. 
Lector: Mr. C. C. ("Trudge") Herbert, III, President, Fel- 
lowship of Christian Athletes. 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Prelude in F minor Handel 

Kleine, Praludien und Intermezzi Schroeder 

I Maestoso 

IV Allegretto 
V Andantino 
Choral Call to Worship—' ' The Lord Is in His Holy Temple ' ' 

James Young 
Hymn — ' ' Come, Thou Almighty King ' ' Felice de Giardini 
The Prayer of Adoration 
The Lord's Prayer 

Anthem — ' ' Kyrie ' ' James Young 

Scripture Lesson 
Hymn — "Spirit of God, Descend Upon My Heart" 

Frederick C. Atkinson 
Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayers of Confession, Thanksgiving, Intercession 

and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "Thanks be to God" (from Elijah) 

Mendelssohn 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — ' ' An Instrument for God ' ' 
Prayer 
Benediction 
Choral Response — "Amen" 



The Chimes 

Closing Organ Voluntary — Carillon 



James Young 
Vierne 



The preacber who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, May 10th, is the Reverend Dr. Eric C. Rust, 
Professor of Christian Philosophy, Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky. 



WESLEY PLAYERS PRESENT 
"BUS STOP" 

Wesley Players will present William Inge's Bus 
Stop, the highly successful three act romantic comedy 
on Saturday, Sunday and Monday, May 2-4, at 7 :45 
P.M. at the Methodist Center. Admission is $1.25. 
Proceeds will go to Dr. Harris Proctor of the Political 
Science Department, for the purchase of books for 
the library of the new Royal College, Nairobi, Kenya. 
Dr. Proctor will be visiting professor there next year. 

The play, directed by Bob Linblad, concerns a bus 
load of people, stranded overnight in a snow storm at 
a bus stop. What happens to them as they come to 
understand themselves and relate to each other makes 
for an entertaining and provocative evening. 



GUEST CARILLON RECITAL 
RONALD BARNES 

Ronald Barnes, distinguished carillonneur of 
Washington Cathedral in the nation's Capitol, will 
present a recital at 3 :00 p.m. on Sunday afternoon, 
May 3rd, on the fifty bell carillon in the Duke Chapel. 
Recognized as a recitalist of first class calibre and 
genuine artistry, Mr. Barnes has also established him- 
self as a foremost authority in the field of early 
carillon music. He has recently edited for publication 
the complete works of Matthias van den Gheyn. 
Among other distinctions, Mr. Barnes is currently 
the president of the Guild of Carilloneurs of North 
America. The public is cordially invited to hear the 
recital which may best be heard from the far end of 
the main Quadrangle. 

The program follows : 

Introduction and Toccata William Walond 

Suite for Guitar (1686) Robert de Visee 

Prelude 

Allemande 

Courante 

Sarabande 

Gavotte 

Menuet I & II 

Bourree 

Gigue 

Four German Dances, K.602 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Slow Dance for Carillon (1956) Roy Hamlin Johnson 

Three Designs for Carillon (1961) Milford Myhre 

Three Short Pieces for Carillon (1959) Jean Miller 

Air 

Lullaby 

Chantey 
Sonatina for Carillon (1956) Sjef Van Balkom 

Andante 
Allegretto 
Adagio 
Allegro 



[3] 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC AND DUKE PLAYERS 
OPERA WORKSHOP 

The Department of Music and the Duke Players 
will present an opera workshop in studio opera on 
Friday and Saturday, May 1st and 2nd at 8 :30 p.m. 
in Branson Hall. Selections from "The Marriage of 
Figaro," "The Magic Flute," "The Barber of 
Seville," and "Hansel and Gretel," will be presented. 
There will be no admission charge and the University 
Community and the general public are cordially in- 
vited to attend. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Richard H. Petersen 
for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on 
Monday, May 4th at 3:30 p.m. in the Library Con- 
ference Room. The subject of Mr. Petersen's dis- 
sertation is "The Treatise of Dionysius Bar Salibhi 
Against the Jews, a Translation and Commentary." 
The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors William Stinespring, John Strugnell, Hugh 
Anderson, Kenneth Clark, and Robert Rogers 
(minor). Professor Stinespring will preside. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 



The Zoology Department will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, May 4th, in the Auditorium of 
the Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Mr. 
Jonathan L. Richardson, Department of Zoology, will 
speak on "Lakes and Lake History in East Africa" 
or "With Livingstone to the Sources of the Nile." 
Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4:00. 



UNIVERSITY RELIGIOUS COUNCIL MEETING 

The final meeting of the Duke University Religious 
Council for the academic year, 1963-64 will be held 
on Monday, May 4th, at the Men's Graduate Center, 
beginning with supper at 5 :45 p.m. All members of 
the Religious Council are expected to be present. On 
this occasion the newly elected officers for the year 
will be installed, and reports of the varied program 
which has been carried out under the auspices of the 
Council will be given. 



ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will meet on Monday, May 4th, 
at 8 :00 p.m. in the Green Room, East Duke Building. 
Professor Alexander Hull of the Department of Ro- 
mance Languages will speak on ' ' The Structure of the 
Canadian French Consonant System." Everyone is 
cordially invited. 



JOSIAH C. TRENT LECTURE 

The annual Josiah C. Trent lecture in the history 
of medicine will be held on Monday, May 4th at 8 :15 
p.m. in the Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 



Dr. Charles Donald O'Malley, Ph.D. will speak on 
"Dionisio Daza Chacon, a 16th Century Spanish 
Surgeon." Dr. O'Malley is Head of the Department 
of the History of Medicine at U.C.L.A. The general 
public is cordially invited to attend. 



CLASSICAL STUDIES LECTURE 

Professor Frank W. Walbank, F. B. A., Rathbone 
Professor of Ancient History in the University of 
Liverpool, will be the guest of the Department of 
Classical Studies Tuesday and Wednesday, May 5th 
and 6th. Educated at Peterhouse, University of Cam- 
bridge, he is the author of many articles and books 
on Hellenistic and Roman Republican history, culmi- 
nating in his Historical Commentary on Polybius. At 
4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 5th he will present a 
public lecture in Room 208 Flowers Building on 
"Polybius and the Roman State." On Wednesday, 
May 6th at 4 :00 p.m. he will hold a colloquium at the 
Universit}' of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, for grad- 
uate students and faculty. 



SIGMA XI LECTURE 

The Society of the Sigma Xi will hold a meeting on 
Tuesday, May 5th at 8:00 p.m. in the Biological Sci- 
ences Building. Speaker for the occasion will be Dr. 
Paul M. Gross, William Howell Pegram Professor of 
Chemistry, and President, Oak Ridge Institute of Nu- 
clear Studies. The subject of his address will be "The 
Status of Science and Scientists in the Decade of the 
Sixties." Also on the program will be initiation of 
new members of Sigma Xi. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mrs. Margaret Jaeger 
Wallace for the Ph.D. degree in Education will be 
held on Wednesday, May 6th at 9 :30 a.m. in Room 
08A West Duke Building. The subject of Mrs. Wal- 
lace's dissertation is "The Relationship Between Be- 
havioral Traits, Self Concept, and Performance of 
Pediatric Nursing Students." The committee to con- 
duct the examination will consist of Professors W. S. 
Gehman, Donald K. Adams, E. C. Bolmeier, W. H. 
Cartwright, and W. S. Stumpf. Professor Gehman 
will preside. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
May 6th at 4:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Mr. John Boyer of the Botany 
Department will speak on the ' ' Effects of Water Stress 
on Metabolic Rates of Cotton Plants with Open 
Stomates. ' ' 

Mr. Bover, an undergraduate of Swarthmore (A.B. 
1959), obtained his M.S. (1961) in the field of mineral 
nutrition under Professor Gerloff at the University of 
Wisconsin. Currently he is working toward completion 
of his doctorate with Professor Kramer in water re- 



[4] 



lations. Mr. Boyer recently won an award from 
American Society Plant Physiology for the best paper 
presented by a graduate at the Association of South- 
eastern Biologists' Meeting's in Atlanta. 

Eefreshments will be served in the foyer at 4:00 
p.m. 



SENIOR PIANO RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a senior 
piano recital by Lydia Cantrell and John Holt, both 
students of Loren Withers on Tuesday, May 5th at 
8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. 
The University Community and the general public are 
cordially invited to attend. 

The program will be as follows : 



Prelude and Fugue in C-Sharp Minor, WTG I 

Mr. Holt 
Allegro from Toccata in G Minor 

Miss Cantrell 
Fantasia in C Minor, K.475 

Mr. Holt 
Sonata in E-Flat, Opus 31, No. 3 
Allegro 

Scherzo ; Allegretto vivace 
Menuetto; Moderato e grazioso 
Presto con fuoco 

Miss Cantrell 
Moments Musicaux 

Opus 94, No. 2 in A-Flat 
Opus 94, No. 3 in F-Minor 
Opus 94, No. 4 in C-Sharp Minor 
Mr. Holt 
Barcarolle, Opus 60 

Miss Cantrell 



Bach 

Bach 

Mozart 

Beethoven 



Schubert 



Chopin 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURE 

President Douglas M. Knight will deliver a public 
lecture before the Divinity School on Wednesday, May 
6th at 11:00 a.m. in York Chapel. Dr. Knight will 
speak on the topic : ' ' The Poet As Prophet : Art and 
Religious Insight." The University Community is 
cordiallv invited. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Chien Ping Lee for 
the Ph.D. degree in Zoology will be held on Wednes- 
day, May 6th, at 2:30 p.m. in Room 225 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Lee's disserta- 
tion is "Water Balance in the Zebra Finch Taeni- 
opygia Castanotis." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors K. Schmidt-Niel- 
sen, E. C. Horn, C. L. Ward, K. M. Wilbur, and W. 
L. Byrne. Professor Schmidt-Nielsen will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Anthony C. Fortosis 
for the Ph.D. degree in Education will be held on 
Thursday, May 7th at 9 :30 a.m. in Room 08A West 
Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Fortosis' disserta- 



tion is "A Study of Certain Characteristics of the 
Christian High Schools Holding Membership in the 
National Association of Christian Schools." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Profes- 
sors W. A. Stumpf, Robert Connery, E. C. Bolmeier, 
O. L. Petty, and Henry Sublett. Professor Stumpf 
will preside. 



JOINT PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

A joint colloquium sponsored by the Departments 
of Psychology at Duke University and the University 
of North Carolina will be held on Wednesday, May 
6th at 4 :30 p.m. in Room 130 Building 9. Dr. Morton 
Deutsch from Columbia University will conduct the 
colloquium; his topic is "Interpersonal Bargaining." 
The public is invited to attend. 



GOTHIC BOOKSHOP 
BOOK AND ART AUCTION 

The Gothic Bookshop's 16th Book and Art Auction 
will be held on Wednesday, May 6th at 6 :45 to 10 :30 
p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. There will be 
auctioned off a large and interesting selection of choice 
books, first editions, books in bindings, old maps, 
prints and paintings. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David E. Smith for 
the Ph.D. degree in Political Science will be held on 
Thursday, May 7th at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 201 Allen 
Building. The subject of Mr. Smith's dissertation is 
"Emergency Government in Canada and Australia; 
A Comparison — 1914-1920." The committee to eon- 
duct the examination consists of Professors J. Harris 
Proctor, John H. Hallowell, Malcolm Jewell, Robert 
R. Wilson, and William B. Hamilton, (minor). Pro- 
fessor Harris will preside. 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 

The Mathematics Department will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, May 7th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 114 
Physics Building. Dr. Reese T. Prosser, Lincoln 
Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
will speak on a topic to be announced. Coffee will be 
served at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 120 Physics Building. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Lewis Dunbar Dove 
for the Ph.D. degree in Botany will be held on Fri- 
day, May 8th, at 9 :30 a.m. in Room 140 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Dove's dis- 
sertation is " Relationship Between Water Stress and 
Organic Nitrogen Constituents of Tomato Leaves." 
The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Paul J. Kramer, W. D. Billings, A. W. 
Naylor, Jane Philpott, and Ronald C. Greene. Pro- 
fessor Kramer will preside. 



[5] 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, May 7th at 4:00 p.m. in Room M-204 
Davison Building. Dr. J. J. Hermans, Sr. Staff Sci- 
entist, Chemstrand Corporation, will speak on "Den- 
sity Gradient Centrif ugation. " 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL 
ENGINEERS MEETING 

The Annual Joint Meeting of the North Carolina 
Section, American Society of Civil Engineers and the 
student chapters of Duke and North Carolina State 
will convene on Friday, May 8th at 9 :45 a.m. at the 
College of Engineering, Duke University. Two tech- 
nical papers from each of the student chapters will 
be presented in competition for awards. The most 
outstanding senior from each College of Engineering 
will be chosen and awards presented. 

The meeting will close with a luncheon and address 
by Dr. James L. Meriam, Dean of Engineering, Duke 
University, at the Holiday Inn downtown. The public 
is cordially invited to attend any of these events. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James R. Coleman 
for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology will be held on Fri- 
day, May 8th, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 225 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Coleman's dis- 
sertation is "Fine Structure and Cytochemistry of 
the Meiotic Chromosome of the Domestic Rooster Gal- 
lus Domesticus." The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors M. J. Moses, E. C. 
Horn, H. S. Roberts, W. R. Guild, and R. C. Greene. 
Professor Moses will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Jon Nelson Moline 
for the Ph.D. degree in Philosophy will be held on 
Friday, May 8th at 3 :00 p.m. in the Library Confer- 
ence Room. The subject of Mr. Moline 's dissertation 
is "Ethical Justification and Knowledge." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Profes- 
sors Charles A. Baylis, Paul Welsh, Bernard Peach, 
N. L. Wilson, and James N. Truesdale (minor). Pro- 
fessor Baylis will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Philip Eugene Miller 
for the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry will be held on 
Saturday, May 9th at 10 :30 a.m. in Room 01 Chemis- 
try Building. The subject of Mr. Miller's dissertation 
is "Kinetic Studies of the Photodeeomposition of 
Hydrogen Peroxide." The committee to conduct the 



examination will consist of Professors Peter Smith, 
Pelham Wilder, Jr., John Saylor, Jacques C. Poirier, 
and F. G. Dressel. Professor Smith will preside. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
CHAMBER MUSIC AND ORGAN RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a student 
chamber music and organ recital, Allan Bone, con- 
ducting, on Friday, May 8th at 8 :15 p.m. in the Alice 
M. Baldwin Auditorium. A chamber orchestra of 
twentj r -three players will accompany the soloists. The 
University Community and the general public are 
cordially invited to attend. The program will be as 
follows : 

Concerto No. 13 in P Major George Frederic Handel 

' ' The Cuckoo and the Nightingale ' ' (1685-1759) 

Larghetto 
Allegro 

William B. Trexler, Organ 
Larghetto 
Allegro 

Jere Farrah, Organ 
Chorale Fantasie on ' ' Christ the Lord 

Has Eisen ' ' Flor Teeters 

Allegro Maestoso (1908- ) 

John Simpson, Organ 
Edward Keller, Trumpet Ben Peck, Trombone 

William Prizer, Trumpet Thomas Anderson, Trombone 

Trio Sonata for Organ and Strings, Arcangelo Corelli 

Opus 1, No. 1 in F Major (1658-1713) 

Grave, Allegro, 
Adagio, Allegro 

Susan Blount, Organ 
Sonata for Organ and Strings, No. 10 

in D Major (K.245) Mozart 

Allegro (1756-1791) 

Annette Brisendine, Organ 
Sonata II for Two Recorders and 

Thorough Bass Arcangelo Corelli 

Andante Largo 
Allemanda Allegro 
Corrente Allegro 
Gavotta Allegro 

May Bates, Alto Recorder 

Carol Papps, Alto Recorder 

Alice Williams, Organ 

Chorale "Praise to the Lord" Earald Bohlig 

Ronald Steed, Baritone 

Edward Keller, Trumpet 

Judith Weingarth, Organ 

Concerto in B Minor for Viola 

and Orchestra Randel-Casadesvs 

Allegro moderato 
Andante ma non troppo 
Allegro molto 

Linda Speck, Soloist 



IGAS ART EXHIBITIONS 
EAST AND WEST GALLERIES 

The Department of Art and the Student Union's 
Fine Arts Committee will show a traveling exhibition 
from the International Graphic Arts Society, Inc., 
New York City as the final exhibit in the academic 
year. The East Gallery in the Woman's College Li- 
brary and the West Gallery in the West Union Build- 
ing's Alumni Lounge will be ready for visitors on 
Sunday, May 2nd and the public is extended a cordial 
invitation to see these contemporary art works. 

The exhibitions present a cross-section of works by 



[6] 



contemporary American, European and Japanese 
artists from the approximately 500 editions which 
IGAS has published during the twelve years of its 
operation. They are a balanced selection ranging from 
realistic and traditional to abstract and expressionist 
forms — a fair presentation of all styles current in the 
United States and abroad. Among the well known 
artists represented in this exhibit are : Karel Appel, 
Leonard Baskin, Hans Erni, Jean Iurcat, Paul Shaub, 
Rikio Takahashi, and Peter Takal. 


LAST CALL 

1964 DUKE GROUP FARE FLIGHTS 
TO EUROPE 

There will be opportunities again this summer for 
members of the Duke University Community to avail 
themselves of "affinity" group discount fares (jet 
planes) to Europe. Applications and full informa- 
tion may be secured from the Information Desk in 
Flowers Lounge as well as in the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, or by calling 286-1911. 

The flight schedules are as follows : 

(1) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 1 via KLM 
June 9 New York — Glasgow — London 
August 19 Amsterdam — New York 

Fare: $352.20 

(2) 1964 Duke Group Flight Number 2 via BOAC— Air France 
June 16 New York — London — Paris 

September 7 Paris — New York 
Fare: $356.00 

Those planning to use this flight are urged to make 
application at once. 

A deadline of Tuesday, May 5th, has been an- 
nounced for those wishing to use the group flight. 
Flight II is uow filled ; a few spaces remain for Flight 


DUKE UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

Spring Semester 1964 
ANY STUDENT WISHING TO PETITION FOR RELIEF 
FROM THREE EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR 
HOURS OR TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME 
MUST REPORT TO HIS DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER 
THAN APRIL 24, 1964, TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN 
SCHEDULE. 

Thursday 

May 14 7:00- 8:00 p.m. Physical Education 

Friday 

May 15 Reading Period No Examination Scheduled 

Saturday 9:00-12:00 noon TTS 3 


May 16 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Economics 52 
Monday 9:00-12:00 noon MWF 2 
May 18 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Physics 2, 42 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Botany 2 


PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 
ANNOUNCEMENT 


Tuesday 9:00-12:00 noon TTS 1 
May 19 2:00- 5:00 p.m. French and Spanish 64 
7:00-10:00 p.m. TTS 7 & Air Science 


"The Duke University Preschool Program has an 
opening in the 5-year old school readiness group. 
Please contact Miss Marie Hinman, Director, 118 Biv- 
ins Building, East Campus or call University exten- 
sion 2705." 


Wednesday 9:00-12:00 noon TTS 4 
May 20 2:00- 5:00 p.m. English 2 
7:00-10:00 p.m. MWF 1 


Thursday 9:00-12:00 noon MWF 5 & MWF 8 




May 21 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Naval Science & Zoology 2 

7:00-10:00 p.m. MWF 7 & Engineering 2.1-2.4 
Friday 9:00-12:00 noon All Languages 2 
May 22 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Mathematics 21, 64, 84 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Philosophy 48 


SEMINAR ON "THE NEW SOUTH" 

Of interest to the University Community is the 
announcement of a special seminar on ' ' The Universi- 


Saturday 9:00-12:00 noon MWF 6 & TTS 5 
May 23 2:00- 5:00 p.m. TTS 2 
Monday 9:00-12:00 noon MWF 3 
May 25 2:00- 5:00 p.m. Mathematics 22, 42 
7:00-10:00 p.m. TTS 6 


ty in a Changing World" to be held on the Duke 
Campus Thursday and Friday, May 7th and 8th. 
Business and industrial leaders from the South will 
join educators from Duke to continue the series of 


Tuesday 9:00-12:00 noon Religion 2, 2X 
May 26 2:00- 5:00 p.m. MWF 4 & Engineering 2.5-2.8 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Political Science 12, 62 


seminars inaugurated two years ago. Seven of Duke 's 
leading faculty members are scheduled to participate 
in the seminar program which will include such topics 
as "The Changing Regional Character of the South" ; 
"Trends and Economic Factors — Implications and 
Futurity"; "Social Change in Race Relations"; 
"New Political Directions of the Unsolid South"; and 
"Relation of Technical Development to the Economy 
of the South." Professors participating in the con- 
ference will be : Paul M. Gross, Pegram Professor of 
Chemistry and former president and board chairman 
of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science ; John C. McKinney, chairman of the depart- 
ment of sociology and anthropology ; Joseph C. Spen- 
gler, James B. Duke Professor of Economics ; Edgar 
T. Thompson, professor of sociology, and past presi- 
dent of the Southern Sociological Association ; George 
L. Maddox, medical Sociologist in the departments of 
psychiatry and sociology; Allan P. Sindler, political 
scientist and specialist in American political parties, 
pressure groups, and voter behavior; and Halliman 


Wednesday 9:00-12:00 noon Chemistry 2 
May 27 2:00- 5:00 p.m. History 2, 2X 

Chemistry (except Chemistry 2) meet for examination at 
the time scheduled for their general lecture period. 

ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE FORE- 
GOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE 
PERIOD BEGINNING May 16, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
May 27, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE GIVEN 
BEFORE 9:00 a.m. May 16, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS TO BE MADE 
IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION WITHOUT THE 
APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

University Schedule Committee 


CANCELLATION 

The student recital schedule for Monday, May 4th 
at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building 
by the Department of Music has been cancelled. 



[7] 



H. Winsbrough, sociologist and specialist in demog- 
raphy, ethnology and human ecology. 

The program of discussions is designed to bring 
business men and educators together for exchanges of 
ideas on questions which concern both groups. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
DUKE CONCERT BAND CONCERT 

The Duke Concert Band, Paul Bryan, Conductor, 
will present a concert in Page Auditorium at 2 :30 
p.m. on Sunday, May 10th. Designed for family en- 
joyment (children of all ages) the program will fea- 
ture marches, instrumental and vocal soloists, "The 
Overture to William Tell" by Rossini (Hiyo Silver!), 
etc. There will be no admission charge. The Universi- 
ty Community and the general public are cordially 
invited. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
CHAPEL CHOIR PRESENTS "ELIJAH" 

The Duke University Chapel Choir will present 
"Elijah," an oratorio by Felix Mendelssohn on Sun- 
day afternoon, May 10th at four o'clock in the Uni- 
versity Chapel. The choir is conducted by James 
Young with Mildred L. Hendrix on the organ. The 
public is cordially invited to attend the presentation 
of this famed oratorio. 

Considered by musical authorities as one of the 
"big three" oratorios (the other two being Handel's 
"Messiah" and Haydn's "Creation"), "Elijah" con- 
tains some of the most beautiful individual sections 
used in church choral repertory. It was last per- 
formed at Duke on May 5th, 1957 under the direction 
of Paul Young with Mildred L. Hendrix as organist. 
This year's performance includes two of the soloists 
who sang in the 1957 performance : John Hanks, 
tenor, as Obadiah and Beatrice Donley, contralto, as 
the Queen. Others in the cast include Byung Kwon, 
baritone, as Elijah ; Alice Riley, soprano, as the 
Widow ; Mrs. Herbert Waldrop, Jr., soprano, as the 



Youth ; Gretchen Rufty, soprano, as An Angel ; Tina 
Pfohl, contralto, as An Angel; Grier Davis, tenor, as 
Ahab ; and Riley Brown, bass. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
FACULTY CLUB PICNIC 

The annual Faculty Club Picnic will be held on 
Saturday, May 16th at 4 :00 p.m. on East Campus near 
the gymnasium. Recreation will include soft-ball and 
a "Hole in One" contest. For the children there will 
be swimming from 4 :15-5 :00, pony and sports-car 
rides. A community supper will begin at 5 :30 with 
each family's contribution served together buffet 
style. Lemonade and ice cream will be provided. 

Members are reminded to return their reservation 
cards to Miss Frances Holton, 202 Gymnasium, East 
Campus, by Tuesday, May 12th. 



PRE-RELEASE FILM SHOWING AND 
DISCUSSION 

On Wednesday, May 6th, at 7 :00 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium Quadrangle Pictures will present a free 
pre-release full length film entitled "Black Like Me" 
based on the book by the same tittle authored by 
John Howard Griffin. This dramatized documentary 
on social and emotional relationships between whites 
and negroes portrays occurrences in Griffin 's true story 
of his experiences while living as a negro in Georgia, 
Alabama, and Louisiana. 

"Black Like Me" is being privately shown to the 
Duke University Community prior to its World 
Premiere on May 20th when it will be shown in 
seventy theatres in New York City as well as in other 
theatres throughout the United States. 

Following the showing of the film, Mr. Julius 
Tannembaum, the Producer, and Dr. Gelolo McHugh 
of the Duke Department of Psychology and Psy- 
chological Consultant to the Director and Producer, 
will be joined by other members of the faculty and 
student body in a discussion of the film with those 
in attendance. 



WEEK OF 



May 10-16, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



May 10-16, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, May 10 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 

Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: Reverend Dr. Eric 
C. Rust, Professor of Christian Philosophy, 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Ser- 
mon: "The Cross and the Throne." Broad- 
cast over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC- 
FM. 

2:30 p.m. Music Department: Duke Concert Band 
Concert. Paul Bryan, Conductor. Page Audi- 
torium. 

4:00 p.m. Duke University Chapel Choir presents 
"Elijah." University Chapel. 

7:30 p.m. Religious Life Staff Discussion on 
Hibankusha (survivors of Hiroshima and 
Nagasaki atomic bombs). First Presbyterian 
Church. 



Monday, May 11 



12:50 



2:30 



3:30 



p.m. Duke-University of North Carolina Na- 
tional Security Policy Seminar, Duke Uni- 
versity Lecture Committee and the United 
States Naval Institute : Speaker : Vice Admiral 
Friedrich C. Ruge. Page Auditorium, 
p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. John 
Terrence Reynolds for the Ph.D. degree in 
Physics. Room 218 Physics Building, 
p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Allen J. 
Koppenhaver for the Ph.D. degree in English. 
Room 128 Old Biology Building. 



4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Elizabeth 
A. Weiant. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5 :30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:30 p.m. Speaker: Vice- Admiral Friedrich C. Ruge. 
Room 139 Social Science Building. 

8:15 p.m. North Carolina Symphony Orchestra 
Concert. Page Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Tuesday, May 12 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson. 
12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 
Volleyball. 

3:00 p.m. Campus Club Garden Party. The Presi- 
dent's Home, 2138 Campus Drive. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Room 114 Physics 
Building. Speaker: Professor Frank W. 
Anderson. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

4:30 p.m. Joint Psychology and Psychiatry Col- 
loquium. Room 130 Building 9. Speaker: Dr. 
John Knott. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 2 02- A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



7:30 p.m. Duke Fencing Club Meeting. Main Floor, 

Card Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Music Department Senior Piano Recital : 

Janice Ray and Frank Gray. Music Room, 

East Duke Building. 



Wednesday, May 13 

10:10 a.m. Divinity School: Closing Convocation. 
York Chapel. 

2:15 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. George 
Allen Neece for the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry. 
Room 303 Chemistry Building. 

3:00 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Bruce 
R. Wenner for the Ph.D. degree in Mathemat- 
ics. Room 219 Physics Building. 

4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Room 130 
Building 9. Speaker: Dr. John "Wright. 

4:15 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Alfred 
Sussman. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. John C. 
Courtney for the Ph.D. degree in Political 
Science. Library Conference Room. 

7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: Page 
Auditorium. "Julius Caesar" with Marlon 
Brando, James Mason, John Gielgud, Louis 
Calhern, and Deborah Kerr. 



Thursday, May 14 

9:00 a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. William 
West Thomas for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Library Conference Room. 
10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Mr. Rodney C. Brown. 

2 :00 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. William 
Thomas Joines for the Ph.D. degree in Electri- 
cal Engineering. Room 132 Engineering Build- 
ing. 

4:00 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council Meeting. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-204 Davison Building. Speaker: Dr. 
Edward F. MacXichol, Jr. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Room 114 Physics 
Building. Speaker: Dr. Reese T. Prosser. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Friends of the Library Annual Spring 
Dinner-Meeting. Union Ballroom. Speaker: 
Dr. Giles E. Dawson. 

8:15 p.m. Music Department: Piano Recital: Stu- 
dents of Ronald Fishbaugh. Music Room, East 
Duke Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Friday, May 15 



10:10 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Holy Communion. Dr. McMurry S. Riehey, 

Celebrant. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 

and under must be accompanied by their 

mothers. 
5:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Annual Spring Initiation 

and Banquet. "Varsity D" Room, Union 

Building. 
7:30 p.m. Bowling for Faculty members and 

families at Sportland. Regular Rates Apply. 



Saturday, May 16 



2:00 



p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Gerald H. 
Shinn for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Library Conference Room, 
p.m. Music Department : Student Piano Recital 
of students of Loren Withers. Music Room, 
East Duke Building. 

p.m. Faculty Club Picnic. East Campus near 
the Gymnasium. 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: Page 
Auditorium. "Julius Caesar" with Marlon 
Brando, James Mason, John Gielgud, Louis 
Calhern, and Deborah Kerr. 



4:00 



4:00 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
Friday, 6 :15 P.M., Supper and worship. This will 
be the final Friday evening program. 

Students who plan to attend the Southwide Stu- 
dent Conference at Ridgecrest, June 4-10, are urged 
to register at the Center by Friday evening. Total 
cost for the week is approximately $25.00. Duke 
B.S.U. will help arrange your transportation, hous- 
ing and meals. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day, 6 :45 P.M.. East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 
EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday, 9 :30 A.M., Holy Communion. Wednesday, 
7 :10 A.M., Holy Communion. Thursday, 5 :30 P.M., 
Holy Communion. 

Members of the University community are invited 
to use the facilities of the Episcopal University Cen- 
ter for study during the exam period. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Chaplain 
William R. Patton) : Sunday, at the Picnic Area in 
Poplar Apts., Erwin Rd., Recreation to begin at 5 :00 
P.M. : Supper at 6 :00. The program will include the 
election of officers. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, 
6 :00 P.M., Evening Prayer. A picnic honoring 
graduating seniors will be held on Saturday after- 
noon, May 23. Details will be announced later. 

The Center is open for study during exams. 
Students are invited to use the facilities. 



[2] 



PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Sunday, 6:00 P.M., Holy Communion and 
Installation of officers. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
(Chaplain John J. Carey) : Sunday, 5 :30 P.M., at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Waldo Beach, 130 Pinecrest 
Road. After supper and a brief business meeting the 
group will discuss Dr. Beach's book, Conscience on 
Campus. Transportation will leave the Chapel steps 
and the East Campus circle at 5 :15 P.M. Thursday, 
12 :40 P.M., Luncheon at Gilbert- Addoms. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Eric C. Rust, Professor of 
Christian Philosophy, Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky, will deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship at 11 :00 
a.m. on Sunday, May 10th, in the University Chapel. 
His subject will be "The Cross and the Throne." 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, May 17th, is the Reverend Dr. Howard C. 
Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. 



CHAPEL CHOIR PRESENTS "ELIJAH" 

The Duke University Chapel Choir will present 
"Elijah," an oratorio by Felix Mendelssohn on Sun- 
day afternoon, May 10th at four o'clock in the Uni- 
versity Chapel. The choir is conducted by James 
Young with Mildred L. Hendrix on the organ. The 
public is cordially invited to attend the presentation 
of this famed oratorio. 

Considered by musical authorities as one of the 
"big three" oratorios (the other two being Handel's 
"Messiah" and Haydn's "Creation"), "Elijah" con- 
tains some of the most beautiful individual sections 
used in church choral repertory. It was last per- 
formed at Duke on May 5th, 1957 under the direction 
of Paul Young with Mildred L. Hendrix as organist. 
This year's performance includes two of the soloists 
who sang in the 1957 performance : John Hanks, 
tenor, as Obadiah and Beatrice Donley, contralto, as 
the Queen. Others in the cast include Byung Kwon, 
baritone, as Elijah ; Alice Riley, soprano, as the 
Widow ; Mrs. Herbert Waldrop, Jr., soprano, as the 
Youth ; Gretchen Rufty, soprano, as An Angel ; Tina 
Pfohl, contralto, as An Angel ; Grier Davis, tenor, as 
Ahab ; and Riley Brown, bass. 



HIBANKUSHA DISCUSSION 

The Religious Life Staff of the University is join- 
ing in sponsoring a meeting to be held in the First 
Presbyterian Church, on Sunday evening, May 10th 
at 7:30 p.m. Five members of a larger group of 
Hibankusha (survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiro- 
shima and Nagasaki) will describe the effects of the 
atomic bomb. The public is cordially invited to attend. 



SPEAKER: VICE ADMIRAL 
FRIEDRICH C. RUGE 

The distinguished German naval historian, Vice 
Admiral Friedrich C. Ruge will visit Duke University 
on Monday, May 11th under the joint auspices of the 



Duke-University of North Carolina National Security 
Policy Seminar, the Duke University Lecture Com- 
mittee, and the United States Naval Institute. 

Admiral Ruge joined the German navy in 1914 
and served in both World Wars. He was in charge of 
all German minesweepers, served on Rommel's staff 
in 1943-44, and finally directed all German naval 
shipbuilding. He wrote the standard history of 
German naval operations, Der Seekrieg, 1939-1945, 
which has been translated into several languages, and 
returned to the Federal Navy as its department head 
in 1956', and as its Inspector from 1957 until his 
retirement in 1961. He is now Professor of History in 
the University of Tubingen. His most recent work 
is an important study of civil-military relations. 

He will speak in Page Auditorium at 12 :50 p.m., 
Monday, May 11th under the auspices of the Duke 
N.R.O.T.C, on German Naval Strategy in the Second 
World War, and to the Duke-University of North 
Carolina National Security Policy Seminar at 7 :30 
p.m. in Room 139, Social Science Building. His topic 
will be "The Defense of Western Europe, from the 
German Point of View." The public is invited to 
both lectures. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
DUKE BAND CONCERT 

The Department of Music will present a concert by 
the Duke Concert Band, Paul Bryan, Conductor, at 
2 :30 p.m. on Sunday, May 10th. Designed for family 
enjoyment (children of all ages) the program will 
feature marches and instrumental and vocal soloists. 
There will be no admission charge. The University 
Community and the general public are cordially in- 
vited to attend. The program will be as follows : 
March "The Fairest of the Fair" John Philip Sousa 

Variations on ' ' The Carnival of Venice ' ' Herbert L. Clarke 

William Prizer, Cornet 
A Sacred Suite, based on well-known Hymns arr. Alfred Peed 
' ' Alleluia ' ' from the motet Exultate Jubilate W. A. Mozart 

Nancy Temple, Soprano 
Glory to God in the Highest Giovanni Pergolesi 

arr. Housekneeht 
Let's Go! arr. Frank Bennett 

March ' ' Colonel Bogey ' ' Kenneth Alf ord 

Medley : ' ' Stardust ' ' and ' ' You Are Too Beautiful ' ' 

arr. R. R. Trevarthen and Dorothy Barker 
Brass and Woodwind Choirs 
Overture to William Tell Gioacchino Rossini 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Terrence 
Reynolds for the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held 
on' Monday. May 11th at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 218 
Physics Buildinar. The subject of Mr. Reynolds' dis- 
sertation is "Theoretical Considerations of the Investi- 
gation of Nuclear Structure by Inelastic Electron 
Scattering." The committee to conduct the examina- 
tion consists of Professors L. C. Biedenharn. Eugene 
Greuling. Richard Walter, David Onley, and David 
Smith. Professor Biedenharn will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Allen J. Koppen- 
haver for the Ph.D. degree in English will be held on 



T3 



Monday, May 11th at 3:30 p.m. in Room 128 Old 
Biology Building. The subject of Mr. Koppenhaver's 
dissertation is "T. S. Eliot's Murder In The Cathe- 
dral: A Study by Allen John Koppenhaver. " The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Grover Smith, Bernard Duffey, C. Richard 
Sanders, and Herman Salinger. Professor Smith will 
preside. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Zoology Department will hold its weekly semi- 
nar on Monday, May 11th, in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Dr. 
Elizabeth A. Weiant, Simmons College, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts will speak on "Endogenous Activity and the 
Roach Nervous System." Coffee and tea will be 
.served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
CONCERT 

The North Carolina Symphony, under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Benjamin Swalin, will present its annual 
concert for adults in Durham on Monday, May 11th 
at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium, with John Thurman, 
'cellist, as guest artist. The program is dedicated to 
the memory of the late Carl C. Council. General 
admission is by membership in the North Carolina 
Symphony Society : all Duke students are eligible for 
complimentary tickets which are available on the 
day of the concert in Room 202-A Flowers Building, 
until 5 :30 p.m. after which time they may be secured 
at the Page Box Office at 7 :30 p.m. 

The Orchestra's appearance here is under the joint 
sponsorship of Duke University Student Union's Fine 
Arts Committee and the Durham Chapter of the 
North Carolina Symphony Society. Financial sup- 
port for the concerts comes from the Durham Chapter 
of the Symphony Society through the sale of member- 
ships in the Society. Memberships are not only valid 
for admission to evening performances throughout 
the State, but also make possible the free matinees 
for the school children. 

The first portion of the program will include 
Weber's Overture to the opera "Euryanthe," Schu- 
bert's Symphony No. VIII in D minor ("Un- 
finished"), and Moncayo's exciting "Huapango." 

Immediately following intermission, John Thur- 
man will join Dr. Swalin and the state Symphony in 
a performance of Schumann's Concerto for Violon- 
cello and Orchestra in A minor. Opus 129. The 
program will close with Tsehaikovsky 's popular and 
delightful ' ' Capriccio Italien. ' ' 



CAMPUS CLUB GARDEN PARTY 

The final meeting of the Duke University Campus 
Club will be a garden party at the home of President 
and Mrs. Douglas Knight, 2138 Campus Drive, on 
Tuesday, May 12th at 3 :00 p.m. Lawn music for the 
occasion will be presented by students and members 
of the faculty of the Department of Music. From 
3 :30 to 3 :45 a woodwind ensemble will perform music 
of the 18th century which was composed especially for 
outdoor occasions. From 4 :00 to 4 :15 a brass en- 
semble will render other selections which were partic- 



ularly composed for outdoor performances. Cele- 
bration is the theme of these musical selections and 
Mr. Richard Trevarthen, visiting lecturer in the 
Department of Music, will conduct. 

Mrs. E. M. Cameron and Mrs. Walter Persons are 
co-chairmen for the garden party to which each 
Campus Club member is urged to bring a friend. 
Hostess Departments will be Administration East. 
Library East, Library West, Physical Education East, 
and Phvsical Education West. 



RENTAL OF ACADEMIC APPAREL 

Members of the Faculty and Staff desiring to rent 
cap, gown or hood for commencement exercises Mon- 
day, June 1st, should place their orders with Duke 
University Stores prior to Monday, May 11th. De- 
livery cannot be assured on orders placed after this 
date. 

For information or ordering; call extension 2344. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. George Allen Neece 
for the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry will be held on 
Wednesday, May 13th at 2:15 p.m. in Room 303 
Chemistry Building. The subject of Mr. Neece 's dis- 
sertation is "A Quantum Statistical Theory of Rare 
Gas Hydroguinone Clathrates and Classical Statisti- 
cal Studies of Hard Line Rotators." The committee 
to conduct the examination consists of Professors J. C. 
Poirier, Paul Gross, Peter Smith, W. R. Krigbaum. 
and Thomas M. Gallie. Professor Poirier will preside. 



PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY JOINT 

COLLOQUIUM 
A Joint Colloquium, sponsored by the Departments 
of Psychology and Psychiatry, will be held on Tues- 
day, May 12th at 4 :30 p.m. in Room 130 Building 9. 
Dr. John Knott, The School of Medicine, State Uni- 
versity of Iowa, will speak on the topic, "Electrical 
Activity of the Brain in Relation to Conditioning." 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 

The Mathematics Department will hold a seminar 
on Tuesday, May 12th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 114 
Physics Building. The speaker will be Professor 
Frank W. Anderson of the University of Oregon and 
the Institute for Advanced Study. He will speak 
on the topic, " Self-injective Rings." Coffee will be 
served at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 120 Physics Building. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Bruce R. Wenner 
for the Ph.D. degree in Mathematics will be held 
on Wednesday. May 13th at 3 :00 p.m. in Room 219 
Physics Building. The subject of Mr. Wenner's dis- 
sertation is "A Nagata-Type Metric on Infinite- 
Dimensional Spaces." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors John H. Roberts. 
Leonard Carlitz. Richard A. Scoville. Joseph R. 
Shoenfield. and Romane L. Clark. Professor Roberts 
will preside. 



[4 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT: SENIOR PIANO 
RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a senior 
piano recital by Janice Ray and Frank Gray on 
Tuesday, Ma}' 12th at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building. Both Miss Ray and Mr. Gray 
are students of Loren Withers. The University Com- 
munity and the general public are cordially invited. 
The program will be as follows : 

French Suite No. 3 in B Minor Bach 

Allemande 
Sarabande 
Minuet 
Gigue 

Miss Ray 
Gavotte and Variations Bameau 

Mr. Gray 
Sonata in A Major, Opus 120 Schubert 

Allegro Moderate 
Andante 
Allegro 

Miss Bay 
Intermezzo in E Major, Opus 116, No. 6 Brahms 

Prelude in G-Sharp Minor, Opus 32, No. 12 Rachmaninoff 

La Cathedrale Engloutie Debussy 

Mr. Gray 
Troisieme Ballade in A-Flat Major, Opus 47 Chopin 

Miss Ray 
Scaramouche Milhaud 

I. Vif 
II. Modere 
III. Brazileira 

Miss Ray and Mr. Gray 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Psychology Colloquium will be held on 
Wednesday" May 13th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 130 
Building 9 (Psychology Building). Dr. John Wright, 
Institute of Child Development, University of Minne- 
sota will speak on "Orienting Response and Search 
Behavior in Children." 



BOTANY SEMINAR 



The Botany Seminar will be held on Wednesday, 
May 13th at 4:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Alfred Sussman 
of the Department of Botany at the University of 
Michigan will speak on "Time-keeping in a Circadian 
Mutant of Neurospora. " 

Professor Sussman received his doctorate at Har- 
vard in 1949, and since that time has taught at 
Michigan. He has held a National Research Council 
Fellowship from Pennsylvania, Lalor Foundation 
Fellowship, NSF Senior Fellowship to work at Cal. 
Tech. and currently serves as chairman of the De- 
partment of Botany. His special field of research is 
physiological mycology. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John C. Courtney for 
the Ph.D. degree in Political Science will be held on 
Wednesday, May 13th at 7 :00 p.m. in the Library 
Conference Room. The subject of Mr. Courtney's 
dissertation is "Canadian Royal Commissions of In- 
quiry, 1946 to 1962 : An Analysis of an Executive 
Instrument of Investigation." The committee to con- 
duct the examination consists of Professors J. Harris 



Proctor, John H. Hallowell, Robert H. Connery, 
Robert R. Wilson, and Harold T. Parker. Professor 
Proctor will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. William West Thomas 
for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on 
Thursday, May 14th at 9 :00 a.m. in the Library Con- 
ference Room. The subject of Mr. Thomas' disserta- 
tion is "An Examination of D. C. Macintosh's R-e- 
ligious Episteniology. " The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Robert E. Cush- 
man, Waldo Beach, William Poteat, and John Hallo- 
well (minor). Professor Cushman will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. William Thomas 
Joines for the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering 
will be held on Thursday, May 14th at 2:00 p.m. 
in Room 132 Engineering Building. The subject of 
Mr. Joines' dissertation is "The Characteristic Im- 
pedance of Symmetrical Strip Transmission Lines 
with Undesired Modes Suppressed." The committee 
to conduct the examination consists of Professors 
Harry A. Owen, Jr., John L. Artley, Charles R. Vail, 
and Walter Gordy. Professor Owen will preside. 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 
MEETING 

The Undergraduate Faculty Council will meet on 
Thursday, May 14th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. 



MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 

The Mathematics Seminar will be held on Thurs- 
day, May 7th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 114 Physics 
Building. Dr. Reese T. Prosser, Lincoln Laboratory, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will speak on a 
topic to be announced. Coffee will be served at 3 :30 
p.m. in Room 120 Physics Building. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will hold a seminar 
on Thursday, May 14th at 4:00 p.m. in Room M-204 
Davison Building. Dr. Edward F. MacNichol, Jr., 
Professor of Biophysics, The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Baltimore, Maryland, will speak on "Rotinal 
Mechanisms for Color and Pattern Vision." 



SPRING INITIATION AND BANQUET 
OF KAPPA DELTA PI 

The annual Spring Initiation and Banquet of 
Alpha Tau Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, honor society 
in Education, will be held on Friday, May 15th. The 
Initiation ceremony will take place in the "D Room" 
of the Union Building at 5 :30 p.m. 

Dr. Gerald Read, national president of Kappa 
Delta Pi and professor of comparative education at 
Kent State University, will be the speaker at the an- 
nual banquet, to be held iu the Union Ballroom at 



[5] 



6:30 p.m. His subject will be "A World of Differ- 
ence. ' ' Reservations must be received in Room 6 West 
Duke Building, by Monday, May lltb. The cost for 
guests will be $2.50 per plate. 



FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY 
DINNER MEETING 

The Friends of the Library will hold their annual 
spring dinner meeting on Thursday, May 14th at 7 :00 
p.m. in the Union Ballroom. Speaker will be Dr. 
Giles E. Dawson, Curator of Books and Manuscripts, 
Folger Shakespeare Library. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT: PIANO RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a piano re- 
cital by students of Ronald Fishbaugh on Thursday, 
May 14th at 8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. The University Community and the general 
public are cordially invited to attend. The program 
will be as follows : 

Polonaise in C Minor 

Georgia Kingson 



Chopin 



Toccata 


Khachaturian 


Marcia Coleman 




Intermezzo in E Major, Opus 116, No. 6 


Brahms 


Dorothy Barker 




Sonata No. 2 


Hindemith 


Michael Menne 




Sonata in A Minor, Opus 42 


Schubert 


Moderato 




Bonnie Brueggemann 




Sonata in G Major, Opus 78 


Schubert 


Molto moderato e cantabile 




Craig Worthington 




Mazurka in A-Flat, Opus 24, No. 3 


Chopin 


Sally Smith 




Arabeske No. 1 


Debussy 


Judy Sector 




Minuet in G Major 


Bach 


Solfeggietto 


C. P. E. Bach 


Nancy Githens 




Concerto in D Major (Coronation) K.537 


Mozart 


Cathy Carlile 




Prelude in C Minor 


Chopin 


Norwegian March, Opus 54 


Grieg 


Bill Stone 




Intermezzo in A Minor, Opus 116, No. 2 


Brahms 


Nancy Temple 




Sonata, Opus 31, No. 1 


Beethoven 


Allegro vivace 




Ormond Hardin 





FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Gerald H. Shinn for 
the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Saturday, 
May 16th at 2:00 p.m. in the Library Conference 
Room. The subject of Mr. Shinn 's dissertation is 
"The Iconography of the Dresden Manuscript of the 
Sachsenspiegel in Relation to Its Weltanschauung 
and Zeitgeist." The committee to conduct the ex- 
amination consists of Professors Ray Petry, Hugh 
Anderson, Hans Hillerbrand, William Stinespring, 
and Robert Rogers (minor). Professor Petry will 
preside. 



ANNUAL FACULTY CLUB PICNIC 

The annual Faculty Club Picnic will be held on 
Saturday, May 16th at 4 :00 p.m. on East Campus near 



the gymnasium. Recreation will include soft-ball and 
a ' ' Hole in One ' ' contest. For the children, there will 
be swimming from 4:15-5:00 p.m., pony and sports 
car rides. A community supper will begin at 5 :30 
p.m. with each family's contribution served together 
buffet style. Lemonade and ice cream will be pro- 
vided. 

Members are reminded to return the reservation 
cards to Miss Frances Holton, 202 Gymnasium, East 
Campus, by Tuesday, May 12th. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT: STUDENT PIANO 
RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a piano re- 
cital by students of Loren Withers on Saturday, May 
16th at 4:00 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. The University Community and the general 
public are cordially invited to attend. 

The program will be as follows : 



Prelude and Fugue in G Minor, 




from "The Well Tempered Clavier," Book I 


Bach 


Mary Dean Lee 




Sonata in A, Opus 2, No. 2 


Beethoven 


First movement: Allegro vivace 




Frances Dick 




Rhapsody in E-flat, Opus 119, No. 4 


Brahms 


Betsy Overman 




Ballade in G Minor, Opus 23 


Chopin 


-Betty Wilkinson 




Sonata in B-flat 


Scarlatti 


Scherzo 


Griff es 


Barbara Watson 




Evening in Granada 


Debussy 


Judy Braden 




Rumanian Folk Dances 


Bartok 



Dance With Stocks 

Waistband Dance 

Stamping Dance 

Hornpipe Dance 

Rumanian Polka 

Quick Dance 

June Thornton 
Preambule, from Partita No. 5 in G 
Sonata in D, Opus 10, No. 3 

First movement : Presto 

John Buggero 



Bach 

Beethoven 



IGAS ART EXHIBITIONS 
EAST AND WEST GALLERIES 

The Department of Art and the Student Union's 
Fine Arts Committee will show a traveling exhibition 
from the International Graphic Arts Society, Inc., 
New York City as the final exhibit in the academic 
year. The East Gallery in the Woman's College Li- 
brary and the West Gallery in the West Union Build- 
ing's Alumni Lounge will be ready for visitors on 
Sunday, May 2nd and the public is extended a cordial 
invitation to see these contemporary art works. 

The exhibitions present a cross-section of works by 
contemporary American, European and Japanese 
artists from the approximately 500 editions which 
IGAS has published during the twelve years of its 
operation. They are a balanced selection ranging from 
realistic and traditional to abstract and expressionist 
forms — a fair presentation of all styles current in the 
United States and abroad. Among the well known 
artists represented in this exhibit are: Karel Appel, 
Leonard Baskin, Hans Erni, Jean Iurcat, Paul Shaub, 
Rikio Takahashi, and Peter Takal. 



[6] 



WEEK OF 

May 17-23, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 

May 17-23, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, May 17 



Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the Uni- 
versity. Sermon: "The Christian Is Free." 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 



Monday, May 18 



2:30 



3:30 



p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. George H. 

La Roi for the Ph.D. degree in Botany. Room 

140 Biological Sciences Building. 

p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Jesse H. 

Brown for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. Room 

307 Divinity Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 
8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty 

children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Tuesday, May 19 

12:00 noon Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-204 Davison Building. Speaker : Dr. 
C. Eyzaguirre. 



12:30-1:30 p.m. Faculty and Graduate Students 

Volleyball. 
3:00 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Charles 

Wellborn for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 

Library Conference Room. 
4:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 

Room M-204 Davison Building. Speaker: Dr. 

Leon Lack. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 



Wednesday, May 20 



9:30 



a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Stephen 
C. Boone for the Ph.D. degree in Anatomy. 
Room 405 Davison Building. 
10:00 a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. John E. 
Woodham for the Ph.D. degree in History. 
Library Conference Room, 
a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Paul 
Wohlford for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology. 
Room 222 Psychology Building, 
p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Max K. 
Sutton for the Ph.D. degree in English. Room 
312 Allen Building. 

p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. W. H. 
Purcell, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Mathe- 
matics. Room 219 Physics Building. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 



11:00 



2:00 



3:00 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



Thursday, May 21 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30 p.m. Society of Friends Meeting. Friends 
Meeting' House, Alexander Street. 

8:00 p.m. Newcomers Club Evening Reception. The 
President's Home. 2138 Campus Drive. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 

Friday, May 22 

8:30 a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. John 
Strickland Boyer for the Ph.D. degree in 
Botany. Room 140 Biological Sciences Build- 
ing. 

9:00 a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Henry 
Otto Stone, Jr., for the Ph.D. degree in 
Zoology. Room 225 Biological Sciences Build- 
ing. 

2:00 p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Prem P. 
Sehgal for the Ph.D. degree in Botany. Room 
140 Biological Sciences Building. 

4:00 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 01 
Chemistry Building. Speaker: Professor 
Emery Gellert. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 12 
and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

7:30 p.m. Bowling for Facility members and 
families at Sportland. Regular rates apply. 

Saturday, May 23 

11:30 a.m. Forum on General Practice. Hospital 
Amphitheater, Duke Hospital. Panel Modera- 
tor: Dr. Barnes Woodhall. 



DENOMINATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BAPTIST CENTER (Chaplain James W. Stines) : 
The Baptist Center is available for use for study 
throughout the exam period. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Tues- 
day: 6 :45 P.M., East Duke Chapel. All are welcome. 
EPISCOPAL CENTER (Chaplain W. Robert Mill) : 
Sunday (Whitsunday), 9:30 A.M., Holy Com- 
munion. Monday (Whitmonday), 7:10 A.M., Holy 
Communion. Tuesday (Whittuesday), 7:10 A.M., 
Holy Communion. Wednesday (Ember Day), 7:10 
A.M., Holy Communion. Thursday (Ember Day), 
7:10 A.M., Holy Communion. Saturday (Ember 
Day), 7:10 A.M., Holy Communion. 

METHODIST CENTER (Chaplain Jack W. Carroll; 
Assistant Chaplain Cranford Johnson) : Sunday, 
6 :00 P.M., Evening Prayer. 



A cookout and party honoring seniors will be held 
May 23 at 5 :00 P.M. at the Methodist Center. Special 
entertainment will be provided by some of the seniors. 
All members of the University community are welcome 
along with dates or wives. It will be appreciated if 
those planning to attend leave a message for Carey 
Shore in Giles House (ext. 2231) by Friday, May 22. 

The Methodist Center invites members of the Uni- 
versity community to make use of the Center for 
study during the examination period. 
PRESBYTERIAN CENTER (Chaplain Charles E. 
Johnson) : Westminster House will be open daily and 
each evening throughout the examination period for 
reading and study. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain 
to the University, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on 
Sunday, May 17th. in the University Chapel. His 
subject will be "The Christian Is Free." 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship, next 
Sunday, May 21th. is the Reverend Dr. Arthur Kale, 
Professor of Christian Education in the Divinity 
School. This service will be the final one in the 
regular 1963-64 series of University Services of 
Worship. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. George H. La Roi 
for the Ph.D. degree in Botany will be held on Mon- 
day, May 18th at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 140 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. La Roi's dis- 
sertation is "An Ecological Study of the Boreal 
Spruce-Fir Forests of the North American Taiga." 
The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Henry J. Oosting, Lewis E. Anderson. W. 
Dwight Billings, Robert L. Wilbur, and S. Duncan 
Heron (minor). Professor Oosting will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Jesse H. Brown for 
the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Mondav, 
May 18th at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 307 Divinity Building. 
The subject of Mr. Brown's dissertation is "The Con- 
tributions of W. Robertson Smith to Old Testament 
Scholarship, with Special Emphasis on Higher Criti- 
cism." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors William Stinespring, John 
Strugnell, Kenneth Clark, Hugh Anderson and Robert 
Roger-> (minor). Professor Stinespring will preside. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will hold a seminar 
on Tuesday, May 19th at 12:00 noon, in Room M-204 
Davison Building. Dr. C. Eyzaguirre, Department 
of Physiology, University of Utah, will speak on the 
topic, ' ' Chemoreceptor Activity of the Carotid Body. ' ' 



[2] 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Charles Wellborn for 
the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Tuesday, 
May 19th at 3 :00 p.m. in the Library Conference 
Room. The subject of Mr. Wellborn 's dissertation is 
"Twentieth Century Pilgrimage : Walter Lippmann 
and the Public Philosophy." The committee to con- 
duct the examination consists of Professors Creighton 
Lacy, Waldo Beach, Hans Hillerbrand, Shelton Smith 
and John Hallowed. Professor Lacy will preside. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Depai-tment of Physiology and Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will hold a seminar 
on Tuesday, May 19th at 4:00 p.m. in Room M-204 
Davison Building. Dr. Leon Lack, Department of 
Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Johns 
Hopkins University School of Medicine, will speak on 
the topic, "Active Transport of Bile Salts." 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Stephen C. Boone for 
the Ph.D. degree in Anatomy will be held on Wednes- 
day, May 20th at 9:30 a.m. in Room 405 Davison 
Building. The subject of Mr. Boone's dissertation is 
"The Site and Synthesis of Liguoceric and Nervonic 
Acids." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Salih Wakil, Duncan Hethering- 
ton, Montrose Moses, Norman Kirslmer, and Talmage 
Peele. Professor Wakil will preside. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John E. Woodham 
for the Ph.D. degTee in History will be held on 
Wednesday, May 20th at 10 :00 'a.m. in Room 103, 
the Library Conference Room. The subject of Mr. 
Woodham 's dissertation is "Hipolito Unanue and The 
Enlightenment in Peru." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors John Tate 
Lanning, John R. Alden, Harold T. Parker, Joel G. 
Colton, and Robert R. Wilson (minor). Professor 
Lanning will preside. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Paul Wohlford for 
the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held on 
Wednesday, May 20th at 11 :00* a.m. in Room 222 
Psychology Building. The subject of Mr. Wohlford 's 
dissertation is "Determinants of Extension of Personal 
Time." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professor Michael A. Wallach, Donald K. 
Adams, lining E. Alexander, Kurt W. Back, and Karl 
Zener. Professor Wallach will preside. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Max K. Sutton 
for the Ph.D. degree in English will be held on 
Wednesday, May 20th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 312 
Allen Building. The subject of Mr. Sutton's dis- 
sertation is "Shaping Forces In the Theory and 



Practice of Victorian Humor." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Lionel 
Stevenson, Benjamin Boyce, C. Richard Sanders, and 
Charles Baylis (minor). Professor Stevenson will 
preside. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. W. H. Pureed, Jr. 
for the Ph.D. degree in Mathematics will be held on 
Wednesday, May 20th at 3:00 p.m. in Room 219 
Physics Building. The subject of Mr. Purcell's dis- 
sertation is "A Calculus-of- Variations Approach to 
the Eigenvalues of a Finite-Difference Equation." 
The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors F. G. Dressel, D. W. Dean, T. M. Gallie, 
S. L. Warner, and F. R. Tangherlini. 



SOCIETY OF FRIENDS MEETING 

The Society of Friends (Quakers) will hold their 
Monthly Meeting on Thursday, May 21st for business 
at 7 :30 p.m. at the Friends Meeting House (Alex- 
ander Street next to Baptist Student Center). The 
meeting will be preceded by "potluck supper" at 6 :00 
p.m. For information call Mrs. Martha Klopfer at 
286-4868. All are welcome. 



NEWCOMER'S CLUB RECEPTION 

The final meeting of the Duke University New- 
comers' Club will be an evening reception for members 
and their husbands given by President and Mrs. 
Douglas Knight at their home on Thursday, May 21st 
at 8 :00 p.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Strickland 
Boyer for the Ph.D. degree in Botany will be held on 
Friday, May 22nd at 8 :30 a.m. in Room 140 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Boyer 's dis- 
sertation is "Effects of Water Stress on Metabolic 
Rates of Cotton Plants with Open Stomates." The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Paul J. Kramer, Aubrey W. Naylor, Lewis E. 
Anderson, Terry W. Johnson, and Charles Tanford. 
Professor Kramer will preside. 

IGAS ART EXHIBITIONS 
EAST AND WEST GALLERIES 

The Department of Art and the Student Union's 
Fine Arts Committee is showing a traveling exhibition 
from the International Graphic Arts Society, Inc., 
New York City as the final exhibit in the academic 
year in the East Gallery in the Woman's College Li- 
brary and the West Gallery in the West Union Build- 
ing's Alumni Lounge. The public is extended a cordial 
invitation to see these contemporary art works. 

The exhibitions present a cross-section of works by 
contemporary American, European and Japanese 
artists from the approximately 500 editions which 
IGAS has published diiring the twelve years of its 
operation. They are a balanced selection ranging from 
realistic and traditional to abstract and expressionist 
forms — a fair presentation of all styles current in the 
United States and abroad. 



[3] 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Henry Otto Stone, 
Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology will be held on 
Friday, May 22nd at 9 :00 a.m. in Room 225 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Stone's dis- 
sertation is "The Effect on Blood Viscosity of Red 
Cell Size and Shape." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Knut Schmidt- 
Nielsen, Karl M. Wilbur, John R. Gregg, Irwin 
Fridovieh (minor), and Robert Hill (minor). Pro- 
fessor Schmidt-Nielsen will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Prem P. Sehgal for 
the Ph.D. degree in Botany will be held on Friday, 
May 22nd at 2 .-00 p.m. in Room 140 Biological Sci- 
ences Building. The subject of Mr. Sehgal \s disserta- 
tion, is "Ontogenetic, Physical and Chemical Studies 
on Urease in Canavalia ensiformis, DC." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Aubrey W. Naylor, Paul J. Kramer, H. S. 
Perry, W. D. Billings, and Ronald C. Greene. Pro- 
fessor Naylor will preside. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 
The Department of Chemistry will hold a Staff 
Seminar on Friday, May 22nd in Room 01 Chemistry 
Building at -4 :00 p.m. Professor Emery Gellert from 
the Wollongong University College of the University 
of New South Wales will speak on the topic, "Pos- 
sible Biogenetic Relationships Between Different 
Basic Alkaloid Systems." All interested persons are 
cordially invited to attend. 



FORUM ON GENERAL PRACTICE 

The Duke Endowment and the Student American 
Medical Association will present a Forum on General 
Practice to be held in the hospital amphitheater on 
Saturday, May 23rd at 11 :30 a.m. Dean Barnes 
Woodhall will be moderator of a panel which includes 
Dr. Nicholas Pisacano, Associate Professor of Post- 
graduate Medicine, University of Kentucky who will 
speak on "Training A Doctor for General Practice"; 
Dr. Amos Johnson, President Elect, American Acad- 
emy of General Practice who will speak on "The 
Future of General Practice in xlinerica"; Dr. Edgar 
Beddington, President, North Carolina Academy of 
General Practice who will discuss "General Practice 
As A Career"; and Dr. Ernest Furgurson, Director 
of Plymouth Clinic. North Carolina who will speak 
on "Satisfactions of General Practice." Portions of 
the Forum will be broadcast. The Forum will con- 
clude at 1 :00 p.m. 



1964 ALUMNI AND COMMENCEMENT EVENTS 

FRIDAY— May 29th 

9:00 a.m. Registration begins (West Campus Union Lobby). 
From 8:00 a.m. 16th Annual Alumni Golf Tournament Be- 
gins. 
5:00 p.m. XROTC 20th Reuniou, Swim Party and Dinner, 

Jack Tar Hotel. 
5:00 p.m. 1933-36, Open House and Dinner, West Campus 
Union. 



6 : 00 p.m. Junior Varsity Begins. 

6:30 p.m. 1939, Social Hour, Buffet Dinner, Holiday Inn 

(downtown). 
6:30 p.m. Medical 1939, Social Hour and Dinner, Hope Val- 
ley Country Club. 
6:30 p.m. 1954, Social Hour and Dinner-Dance, Jack Tar 

Hotel. 
6:30 p.m. Medical 1954, Social Hour and Dinner, Hartman's 

Steak House. 
SATURDAY— May 30th 

Alumni Golf Tournament Continues (Golfers may tee 

off as late as 11:00 a.m.) 
8:30 a.m. 1939, Breakfast, West Campus Union. 
8:30 a.m. 1933-36, Breakfast, West Campus Union. 
9:30 a.m. Medical 1939 and 1954 Continental Breakfast, 

Medical Center. 
10:00 a.m. Alumni Lecture Series VI — "Latin America in 

Ferment." 
12:15 p.m. Engineering Alumni Association Luncheon, Men's 

Graduate Center Dining Halls. 
1:00 p.m. National Council Luncheon, Union Ballroom. 
2:00-4:30 p.m. Guided Tours of Campus. 
4:00 p.m. Medical 1939, Social Hour — Open House at Holi- 
day Inn (West). 
4:00 p.m. Medical 1954, Social Hour at Sehrafft's Country 

Inn. 
4:C0 p.m. 1954, Open House, Home of Edward and Elizabeth 

Hart King, 2705 Princeton Drive. 
4:00 p.m. 1958-60, Open House, Home of W. Banks and 

Nancy Walker Auderson, Jr., 3437 Sheridan Drive. 
4:00 p.m. 1939, Open House for invited faculty and staff. 
6:00 p.m. General Alumni Dinner, The Great Hall. 
8:45 p.m. Hoof V Horn Show "Can-Can," Page Auditorium. 
9:00 p.m. NKOTC 20th Reunion Dance, Saddle and Fox 

Steak House, 3211 Hillsboro Road. 
SUNDAY— May 31st 
8:30 a.m. 1914, Breakfast, Old Trinity Room. 
9:00 a.m. 1954, Breakfast, Men's Graduate Center Dining 

Halls. 
11:00 a.m. Baccalaureate Sermon, Douglas Maitland Knight, 

President of Duke University. 
12:30 p.m. Half Century Club Luncheon, Ballroom. 
12:30 p.m. 1939, Buffet Luncheon, The Great Hall. 
1:00 p.m. 1916, Annual Buffet Luncheon, "D" Room, West 

Campus Union. 
1:00 p.m. 1917, Buffet Luncheon, Men's Graduate Center 

Dining Halls. 
6:00 p.m. Outdoor Reception, honoring Graduating Classes, 

East Campus Lawn. 
8:15 p.m. Hoof V Horn Show, "Can-Can," Pace Auditorium 
MONDAY— June 1st 

8:00 a.m. Commissioning Exercises, NROTC. AFROTC. 
10:30 a.m. Graduating Exercises, Calvin Bryce Hoover, James 

B. Duke Professor of Economics, speaker. Indoor Sta- 
dium. 



DINING HALLS COMMENCEMENT 
SCHEDULE— 1964 



SATURDAY— May 30 
University Room 
Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 

Snack Bar 9:30-11:00 

Lunch 11:00- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 

SUNDAY— May 31 

Blue and White Room 
Breakfast 7:00-10:30 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 

MONDAY— June 1 

Blue and White Room 
Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 

Snack Bar 9:00-11:00 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 



Oak Room 



11:30- 2:00 
5:00- 7:00 

Oak Room 



11:30- 2:00 
5:00- 7:00 



Oak Room 



11:30- 2:00 



[4J 



WEEK OF 

May 24-June 1,1964 



CALENDAR 

OF 



WEEK OF 

May 24-June 1,1964 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, May 24 



Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship, University 
Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. W. 
Arthur Kale. Sermon: "The Agonies of a 
Good Conscience." Broadcast over Radio Sta- 
tion WDNC and WDNC-FM. 



Monday, May 25 



9:30 



2:00 



a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. John 
Darrell Bashaw for the Ph.D. degree in Chem- 
istry. Room 220 Chemistry Building. 
p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. John Reid 
Hauser for the Ph.D. degree in Engineering. 
Room 132 Engineering Building. 
4:30-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members and students. 



Tuesday, May 26 

9:30 a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. David 

Rogers for the Doctor of Education degree. 

Room 08A West Duke Building. 
4:30-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members and students. 
7:30 p.m. Address by the Honorable Robert F. 

Kennedy, Attorney General of the United 

States. Page Auditorium. 



Wednesday, May 27 



9:00 



2:00 



a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. David 
Kaylor for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. Li- 
brary Conference Room. 
9:00 a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. Robert 
Ross Byrd for the Doctor's Degree in Educa- 
tion. Room 08-A West Duke Building. 
10:00 a.m. The Final Examination of Mr. William 
Kierce for the Ph.D. degree in English. Room 
312 Allen Building. 

p.m. The Final Examination of Mr. William 
Hoyt Danzler for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology. 
Room 225 Biological Sciences Building. 



Thursday, May 28 

4:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room 204 Davison Building. Speaker: Pro- 
fessor Bernard C. Abbott. 

4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. 



Friday, May 29 

8:00 a.m. Alumni Golf Tournament. Duke Uni- 
versity Golf Course. 

9:00 a.m. Registration for Alumni and Commence- 
ment Events. West Campus Union Lobby. 
(See special notice for schedule of events.) 

4:00 p.m. Regular University Faculty Meeting. 
Room 125 Engineering Building. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Sundial should be submitted IN WRITTEN 
FORM to Room 2 02- A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later than 1:00 p.m., 

Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



Saturday, May 30 

10:00 a.m. Phi Beta Kappa Business Meeting. Boom 

205 Divinity School. 
10:00 a.m. Alumni Lecture Series VI. "Latin 
America In Ferment." Boom 139 Social Sci- 
ence Building. 
2:00-4:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. Univer- 
sity Chapel. 
8:30 p.m. Hoof 'n' Horn Production, "Can-Can." 
Page Auditorium. 

Sunday, May 31 

11:00 a.m. Baccalaureate Sermon: Dr. Douglas M. 
Knight, President of Duke University. Uni- 
versity Chapel. 

2:30 p.m. School of Nursing Pin Ceremony. Uni- 
versity Chapel. 

3:30 p.m. Commencement Carillon Recital: Anton 
Brees. University Chapel. 

4:30 p.m. Commencement Organ Becital: Mildred 
L. Hendrix and Julia Mueller. 

6:00 p.m. Commencement Outdoor Reception. Lawn 
in front of East Duke Building. 

7:25 p.m. Flag Lowering. East Campus. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof V Horn: "Can-Can." Page 
Auditorium. 

Monday, June 1 

8:00 a.m. AFBOTC Commencement Ceremony. 

Engineering Auditorium. 
8:30 a.m. NROTC Commencement Ceremony. 

Chapel Steps. 
10:30 a.m. Graduation Exercises. Indoor Stadium. 

Speaker: Calvin Bryce Hoover, James B. 

Duke Professor of Economics. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. W. Arthur Kale, Professor of 
Christian Education, the Divinity School, will deliver 
the sermon at the University Service of Worship at 
11:00 a.m. on Sunday, May 24th in the University 
Chapel. His subject will be "The Agonies of a Good 
Conscience. ' ' The order of worship follows : 
Opening Organ Voluntary — Pastorale Darius Milhaud 

Rhosymedre Vaughan Williams 

Hymn — "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" Martin Luther 

The Prayer of Adoration 
The Lord's Prayer 

Anthem — ' ' Sing Unto the Lord ' ' Henry Purcell 

Scripture Lesson— Job 6: 1-4; 19: 21-26 
Hymn — "Where Cross the From William Gardiner's 

Crowded Ways of Life" Sacred Melodies 

Call To Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayer of Confession, Thanksgiving, 

Intercession and Petition 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — " Alleluia!" Georg Friedrieh Handel 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 

Sermon — "The Agonies of a Good Conscience" 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Amen" James Young 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Fugue in E flat 

(the St. Anne) J- S. Bach 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Darrell Bashaw 
for the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry will be held on 
Monday, May 25th at 9 :30 a.m. in Boom 220 Chemistry 
Building. The subject of Mr. Bashaw's dissertation 
is "Experimental Studies of Some Organic Semi- 
conductors." The committee to conduct the examina- 
tion consists of Professors Paul Gross, Peter Smith, 
Douglas Hill, Jacques Poirier and Horst Meyer. 
Professor Gross will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Reid Hauser 
for the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering will 
be held on Monday, May 25th at 2:00 p.m. in Boom 
132 Engineering Building. The subject of Mr. 
Hauser's dissertation is "A Study of Interactions in • 
Silicon Multi-Junction Devices." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Robert 
M. Burger, Harry A. Owen, Jr., Theo C. Pilkington, 
and Harold W. Lewis. Professor Burger will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE D.ED. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David Rogers for the 
Doctor of Education Degree will be held on Tuesday, 
May 26th at 9:30 a.m. in Room 08A West Duke 
Building. The subject of Mr. Rogers' dissertation 
is "A Description of the In-Service Education Pro- 
gram in the City Schools of Lumberton, North Caro- 
lina for the 1961-62 School Year." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors W. A. 
Stumpf, E. C. Bolmeier, A. S. Hurlburt, W. S. 
Gehman, and Donald F. Boy. Professor Stumpf will 
preside. 



ADDRESS BY THE HONORABLE 

ROBERT F. KENNEDY 

ATTORNEY GENERAL OF 

THE UNITED STATES 

On Tuesday, May 26th the University will have as 
its guest the Honorable Robert F. Kennedy, Attorney 
General of the United States, who will speak in Page 
Auditorium at 7 :30 p.m. The public is cordially in- 
vited to attend the address and to participate in the 
question-answer period following. Mr. Kennedy's 
enroute visit will be sponsored by the Educational 
Affairs Committee of the Duke Student Union. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David Kaylor for 
the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Wednes- 
day, May 27th at 9 :00 a.m. in the Library Conference 
Room. The subject of Mr. Kaylor's dissertation is 
' ' The Ascension Motif in Luke-Acts, the Epistle to the 
Hebrews and the Fovu-th Gospel." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors James 
Price, Hugh Anderson, Frederick Herzog. William 
Stinespring, and Robert Rogers (minor). Professor 
Price will preside. 



[2] 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE DOCTOR OF EDUCATION DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Robert Ross Byrd 
for the Doctor of Education degree will be held on 
Wednesday, May 27th, at 9:00 a.m. in Room 08-A 
West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Byrd's 
dissertation is "A Synoptic Comparison of Certain 
Variables Found in Educational Programs in Selected 
Residential Centers Treating Severely Disturbed 
Children." The committee to conduct the examina- 
tion consists of Professors W. Scott Gehman, W. H. 
Cartwright, Ila Gehman, 0. L. Petty, and W. A. 
Stumpf. Professor Gehman will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. William Keirce for 
the Ph.D. degree in English will be held on Wednes- 
day, May 27th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 312 Allen 
Building. The subject of Mr. Keirce 's dissertation is 
"The Place of Samuel Johnson in the History of the 
Literary Character." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Benjamin Boyce, 
Charles E. Ward, Holger O. Nygard and Paul Welsh. 
Professor Boyce will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. William Hoyt 
Dantzler for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology will be held 
on Wednesday, May 27th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 225 
Biological Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. 
Dantzler 's dissertation is "The Role of the Kidneys 
and Bladder in the Handling of Water and Solutes in 
the Fresh-Water Turtle, Pseudemys scripta, and the 
Desert Tortoise, Gopherus agassizii." The committee 
to conduct the examination consists of Professors 
Bodil Schmidt-Nielsen, Knut Schmidt-Nielsen, Peter 
H. Klopfer, F. John Vernberg, and Henry Kamin 
(minor). Professor Bodil Schmidt-Nielsen will pre- 
side. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharma- 
cology, Duke University Medical Center, will hold a 
seminar on Thursday, May 28th at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 
M-204 Davison Building. Professor Bernard C. 
Abbott, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, 
University of Illinois will speak on "Aspects of 
Muscle Contractility." 



ALUMNI GOLF TOURNAMENT 

The 16th annual Duke Alumni Golf Tournament 
will get underway Friday morning, May 29th at 8 :00 
a.m. on the Duke University Golf Course. The event 
is open to all returning Alumni as well as seniors, 
their parents, and members of the faculty and staff. 
The tournament will include both men's and women's 



divisions plus several special divisions. Trophies 
and prizes for eleven division winners will be dis- 
played at Alumni Headquarters in the Alumni Lounge 
of the West Campus Union. Winners will be an- 
nounced on Saturday night, May 30th and prizes may 
be picked up on Sunday and Monday, May 31st and 
June 1st. Registration for the event is $1.00 ; Greens 
Fees are $3.00. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The last regular meeting of the Academic Council 
during the present academic year is scheduled for 
4:00 p.m., Thursday, May 28th, in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. The agenda will include the following 
items : 

1. Discussion by the Council of the report presented by its 
Committee on Faculty and Staff Housing, Professor R. L. 
Watson, Jr., Chairman. 

2. Progress report of the Faculty Committee on Tenure Policies 
and Practices, Professor R. H. Connery, Chairman. 

Members are asked to bring with them their copies 
of the Housing Committee Report. Those unable to 
attend are asked to give advance notice to the Secre- 
tary (Extension 2214; 136 Engineering Building). 



REGULAR MEETING OF THE 
UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

The University Faculty will meet in regular ses- 
sion in Room 125 Engineering Building on Friday, 
May 29th at 4:00 p.m. The agenda will include ap- 
proval of candidates for degrees to be conferred at 
the Commencement of June 1, 1964. 



PHI BETA KAPPA BUSINESS MEETING 

Phi Beta Kappa will hold its final business meeting 
of the academic year on Saturday, May 30th, at 10 :00 
a.m. in Room 205 Divinity School. The main busi- 
ness of this meeting will be the election of under- 
graduate and graduate members. The committees in 
charge of these elections will report on their nomina- 
tions. All active members are urged to be present. 



1964 ALUMNI LECTURES 

"Latin America in Ferment," a panel discussion, 
will be the feature of this year's alumni lectures to be 
held on Saturday, May 30th at 10:00 a.m. in Room 
139 Social Science Building. Begun in 1959, this 
series has become one of the principal high-lights 
of Commencement and Reunion Weekend. Each 
panelist will speak for fifteen minutes ; then following 
a short coffee break, the panel will have an informal 
discussion and entertain questions from the floor. 

Members of the panel will be : Dr. Robert S. 
Smith, Professor of Economics, Dr. Alan K. Man- 
chester, Professor of History and Dean of Trinity 
College; Dr. E. Croft Long, Associate Professor of 
Physiology and Pharmacology, and Associate in 
Pediatries; and The Reverend Robert P. Hyatt, 
former Associate Director of Religious Life at Duke. 
Dr. Smith will moderate the discussion. 



[3] 



HOOF 'N' HORN PRODUCTION OF "CAN-CAN" 
Duke Hoof 'n' Horn Club will present its produc- 
tion of the Broadway smash hit and movie success, 
"Can-Can," on Saturday, May 30th at 8:30 p.m. 
and on Sunday, May 31st at 8 :15 p.m. The curtain of 
the Saturday evening performance will not go up 
until the General Alumni Dinner has adjourned. 

Tickets for both performances are $1.75, all seats 
reserved, and will be on sale in the Page Auditorium 
Box Office from Tuesday, May 26th through Sunday, 
May 31st from 2 :00-5 :00 p.m.' On Saturday and Sun- 
day the box office will remain open from 2 :00 p.m. 
until curtain time. 



COMMENCEMENT CARILLON RECITAL 

Anton Brees, Carillonneur, Bok Singing Tower, 
Lake Wales, Florida, will present a carillon recital 
from the University Chapel Tower on Sunday, May 
31st at 3 :30 p.m. as part of the Commencement Pro- 
gram. The performance will be this distinguished 
artist's 33rd consecutive commencement recital at 
Duke. 

The program follows: 

1. America 

2. (a) The Blue Bells of Scotland 

(b) Santa Lucia 

(c) Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair 

3. (a) Musette 
(b) Gavotte (Les Moutons) 

(a) God of our Fathers 
Lead, Kindly Light 
Solvejgslied 

(b) My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice 

from "Samson and Delilah" 
6. Alma Mater—' ' Dear Ole Duke ' ' 



(b) 
5. (a) 



Scotish Song 

Neapolitan Song 

Stephen Foster 

J. S. Bach 

Martini 

G. Warren 

J. B. Dykes 

Grieg 

Saint-Saens 
B. E. James, '24 



COMMENCEMENT RECITAL FOR 
ORGAN AND STRINGS 

One of the musical features of Commencement 
Weekend will be the organ and violin recital to be 
presented on Sunday afternoon. May 31st at 4:30 
o'clock in the University Chapel by Mildred L. Hen- 
drix, University organist, and Julia Mueller, violinist, 
both members of the Department of Music. The artists 
will be heard in selections for organ and violin alone 
as well as chamber works for both instruments. 

Mrs. Hendrix will play the Prelude and Fugue in 
G minor by Buxtehude, the Bach "St. Anne Fugue 
in B-flat," and the Introduction and Passacaglia by 
Max Roger. Additionally, she will be heard in Two 
Chorale Preludes by the Acting Director of Choral 
Activities at Duke, Mr. James Young, whose organ 
preludes had premiered here earlier this year. 

Mrs. Mueller, violist in the Duke String Quartet 
this past season, will play the unaccompanied Sonata 
No. 5, opus 5 by Arcangelo Corelli — one of the 12 
solo sonatas for violin composed by the late 17th cen- 
tury Italian — the "Trauermusik" — (Music of Morn- 
ing) by Paul Hindemith, and the Andante movement 
of the Mendelssohn-Bartholdy violin concerto, opus 64, 
the latter two works with organ accompaniment. 

Mr. Young's organ preludes, "Es ist genug," and 
"Wie soil ich dich empfangen," contain melodies 
familiar in the sacred chorale literature of Bach, al- 
though Hans Leo Hassler is credited with the melody 



of the second chorale in the group by Mr. Young. He 
holds degrees in Music Composition from Boston Con- 
servatory of Music, and, before coming to Duke in the 
fall of 1962 as Assistant Director of Choral Activities 
under Professor Paul Young, was performing at 
King's Chapel in Boston. He has composed a piano 
sonata, a suite for winds, a string quartet, and several 
short pieces for orchestra and chorus as well as music 
for the Office of Tenebrae — used the past five years 
at King's Chapel on Good Friday Night, 
The program will be as follows : 



Prelude and Fugue in G minor 
Sonata no. V opus 5 

Adagio 

Vivace 

Adagio Cantabile 

Giga 



Mrs. Mueller 



Two Chorale Preludes 



"Es ist genug" 
' ' Wie soil ich dich empfangen ' ' 
Trauermusik — Music of Mourning 



Dietrich Buxtehude 
(1637-1707) 
Arcangelo Corelli 
(1653-1713) 



James Young 
(1930- ) 



Paul Hindemith 
(1895-1963) 



I Langsam 
II Euhig Bewegt 
III Lebhaft 

IV Choral ' ' Fiir deinen Thron tret ich Hiermit ' ' 
Fugue in E flat (the St. Anne) Johann Sebastian Bach 

(1685-1750) 
Concerto opus 64 for Violin Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy 

(1809-1S47) 
Andante 

Mrs. Mueller 
Introduction and Passacaglia Max Beqer 

(1873-1916) 



COMMENCEMENT 
OUTDOOR RECEPTION 

The Committee on Arrangements for the Outdoor 
Reception in honor of the graduating classes wishes 
to remind the faculty that this reception is to be held 
on Sunday, May 31st at 6 .-00 p.m. on the lawn in 
front of East Duke Building. All faculty members 
and their wives are cordially invited to attend. In 
the event of rain, the reception will be held in the 
Woman's College Union. 



DINING HALLS COMMENCEMENT 
SCHEDULE— 1964 

SATURDAY— May 30 

University Boom Oak Room 

Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 

Snack Bar 9:30-11:00 

Lunch 11:00- 2:00 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 5:00- 7:00 



SUNDAY— May 31 
Blue and White Boom 
Breakfast 7:00-10:30 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 

MONDAY— June 1 
Blue and White Boom 
Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 

Snack Bar 9:00-11:00 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 



Oak Boom 



11:30- 2:00 
5:00- 7:00 



Oak Boom 



11:30- 2:00 



[4j 



GENERAL LIBRARY 

Intercession schedule May 27 — June 9, 1964 

8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 



Wednesday, May 27 

Thursday, May 28-Tuesday, June 9 

Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 



8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. 

Closed 



Summer Session — June 10- August 21 



Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 



00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. 
00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 
00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. 



WOMAN'S COLLEGE LIBRARY 

8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 



"Wednesday, May 27 

Thursday, May 28-Wednesday, Sept. 23 

Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 



8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. 

8:30 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. 

Closed 



Schedules for other libraries will be posted. 



1964 SUMMER SESSION 

Registration for Term I for the 1964 Summer Ses- 
sion will be Tuesday, June 9th from 8 :30 a.m. to 1 :00 
p.m. Term II registration must be completed by 
Thursday, July 16th. Duke students may pre-register 
prior to Friday, June 5th. 

Summer Session Bulletins and information may 
be obtained at Room 119 Allen Building or by calling 
extension 2621. 



IGAS ART EXHIBITIONS 
EAST AND WEST GALLERIES 

The Department of Art and the Student Union's 
Fine Arts Committee is showing a traveling exhibition 
from the International Graphic Arts Society, Inc., 
New York City as the final exhibit in the academic 
year in the East Gallery in the Woman's College Li- 
brary and the West Gallery in the West Union Build- 
ing's Alumni Lounge. The public is extended a cordial 
invitation to see these contemporary art works. 

The exhibitions present a cross-section of works by 
contemporary American, European and Japanese 
artists from the approximately 500 editions which 
IGAS has published during the twelve years of its 
operation. They are a balanced selection ranging from 
realistic and traditional to abstract and expressionist 
forms — a fair presentation of all styles current in the 
United States and abroad. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

This is the final issue of the University Weekly 
Calendar for the year 1963-64. On Tuesday, June 9th, 
registration day for the Summer Session, the first 
issue of the SUNDIAL, an announcement of weekly 
activities of the summer months, will be distributed 
in the Indoor Stadium. This will be a general orienta- 
tion issue. Anyone wishing to have a notice in this 
issue is requested to submit copy to the Calendar 
Office, Room 202-A Flowers Building, by 1 :00 p.m. 
on Thursday, June 4th. 

The SUNDIAL will be issued each Saturday there- 



after during the summer session months. It will be 
distributed to the faculty and administration on East 
and West Campuses and will be available to students 
on bulletin boards and in the dormitory offices. 

Copy for regular issues of the SUNDIAL must be 
submitted in typewritten form to Room 202-A Flowers 
Building by 1 :00 p.m. on Wednesday prior to publi- 
cation on Saturday. 



1964 ALUMNI AND COMMENCEMENT EVENTS 

FRIDAY— May 29th 

9:00 a.m." Registration begins (West Campus Union Lobby). 
From 8:00 a.m. 16th Annual Alumni Golf Tournament Be- 
gins. 

5:00 p.m. NROTC 20th Reunion, Swim Party and Dinner, 
Jack Tar Hotel. 

5:00 p.m. 1933-36, Open House and Dinner, West Campus 
Union. 

6:00 p.m. Junior Versity Begins. 

6:30 p.m. 1939, Social Hour, Buffet Dinner, Holiday Inn 
(downtown). 

6:30 p.m. Medical 1939, Social Hour and Dinner, Hope Val- 
ley Country Club. 

6:30 p.m. 1954, Social Hour and Dinner-Dance, Jack Tar 
Hotel. 

6:30 p.m. Medical 1954, Social Hour and Dinner, Hartman's 
Steak House. 

SATURDAY— May 30th 

Alumni Golf Tournament Continues (Golfers may tee 

off as late as 11:00 a.m.) 
8:30 a.m. 1939, Breakfast, West Campus Union. 
8:30 a.m. 1933-36, Breakfast, West Campus Union. 
9:30 a.m. Medical 1939 and 1954 Continental Breakfast, 

Medical Center. 
10:00 a.m. Alumni Lecture Series VI — "Latin America in 

Ferment." 
12:15 p.m. Engineering Alumni Association Luncheon, Men's 

Graduate Center Dining Halls. 
1:00 p.m. National Council Luncheon, Union Ballroom. 
2:00-4:30 p.m. Guided Tours of Campus. 
4:00 p.m. Medical 1939, Social Hour — Open House at Holi- 
day Inn (West). 
4:00 p.m. Medical 1954, Social Hour at Schrafft's Country 

Inn. 
4:00 p.m. 1954, Open House, Home of Edward and Elizabeth 

Hart King, 2705 Princeton Drive. 
4:00 p.m. 1958-60, Open House, Home of W. Banks and 

Nancy Walker Anderson, Jr., 3437 Sheridan Drive. 
4:00 p.m. 1939, Open House for invited faculty and staff. 
6:00 p.m. General Alumni Dinner, The Great Hall. 
8:30 p.m. Hoof 'n' Horn Show "Can-Can," Page Auditorium. 
9:00 p.m. NROTC 20th Reunion Dance, Saddle and Fox 

Steak House, 3211 Hillsboro Road. 

SUNDAY— May 31st 
8:30 a.m. 1914, Breakfast, Old Trinity Room. 
9:00 a.m. 1954, Breakfast, Men's Graduate Center Dining 
Halls. 
11:00 a.m. Baccalaureate Sermon, Douglas Maitland Knight, 

President of Duke University. 
12:30 p.m. Half Century Club Luncheon, Ballroom. 
12:30 p.m. 1939, Buffet Luncheon, The Great Hall. 
1:00 p.m. 1916, Annual Buffet Luncheon, "D" Room, West 

Campus Union. 
1:00 p.m. 1917, Buffet Luncheon, Men's Graduate Center 

Dining Halls. 
6:00 p.m. Outdoor Reception, honoring Graduating Classes, 

East Campus Lawn. 
8:15 p.m. Hoof 'n' Horn Show, "Can-Can," Page Auditorium. 

MONDAY— June 1st 
8:00 a.m. Commissioning Exercises, NROTC, AFROTC. 

10:30 a.m. Graduating Exercises, Calvin Bryce Hoover, James 
B. Duke Professor of Economics, speaker. Indoor Sta- 
dium. 



[5] 




THE SUNDIAL of 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 

JUNE28-JULY 4,1964 



Events of the Week 



SUNDAY, JUNE 28 

8:30-9:00 a.m. Chapel Choir Kehearsal. Univer- 
sity Chapel. 

9:30-10:30 a.m. University Service of Worship. 
University Chapel. Presiding 1 Minister: The 
Keverend A. Jack Wilson, III, Associate Di- 
rector of Religious Activities. Preacher: The 
Reverend Charles Wellborn, Tyner Professor 
of Religion, Campbell College. Subject: "Is 
Anything Wrong." 
10:45-11:30 a.m. Chapel Social Hour. Union Ball- 
room. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC. 

4:30 p.m. Y.W.C.A. Annual International Picnic. 
Home of Dr. and Mrs. W. K. Cuyler on 
Garrett Road. 

6:30 p.m. Service of Holy Communion. West- 
minster House (the Presbyterian Student 
Center). Alexander Avenue. 



MONDAY, JUNE 29 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by 
their own parents. 



TUESDAY, JUNE 30 

12 :30 p.m. Summer Luncheon for Education Stu- 
dents. Union Ballroom. 
2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



4:30 p.m. Softball game. Economics vs. The 

Institute. 
4:30 p.m. Softball game. Chemistry vs. The 

Boomers. 
4:30 p.m. Mets vs. Psychology-Sociology. 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 1 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
Meeting of Softball Managers. Champion de- 
clared. All-Star team selected. Card Gym- 
nasium. 

8:00 p.m. Summer Entertainment Series: Bartron, 
American Pantomimist. Page Auditorium. 
Informal reception following performance. 
Union Ballroom. 



THURSDAY, JULY 2 

2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
Softball All-Star Team Practice. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Open Seminar on "Science and 
Christian Faith: Towards a Reunion." Room 
237 Building 10. Speaker: Dr. Roger Pain. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by 
their own parents. 



FRIDAY, JULY 3 

2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
8:30-11:30 p.m. Friday Night Open House. Card 

Gymnasium. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for The Sundial should be submitted in written form to 

Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later than 1:00 p.m. 

Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



SATURDAY, JULY 4 

No Classes. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Lucky Jim," with Ian Car- 
michael, Terry Thomas, and Hug'h Griffith, 
is a rollicking lampoon of university life by the 
Boulting Brothers, Britain's most successful 
laugh-makers. "They'll laugh their heads off 
—and think a little, too !"— N. Y. Post. Adults 
$.50, Children $.10. 



CHAPEL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship on 
Sunday, July 5th, is The Reverend Dr. Thor Hall, 
Assistant Professor of Preaching and Theology, in 
the Divinity School. The service will commence at 
9 :30 a.m. and will be concluded at 10 :30 a.m. 

Following the University Service of Worship each 
Sunday, the congregation is invited to go directly to 
the Union Ballroom, on the second floor of the Union 
Building, for an informal period of fellowship and 
discussion. The Ballroom is air-conditioned. Mem- 
bers of the congregation will have opportunity to ask 
questions pertaining to the Chapel sermon and to meet 
other members of the congregation whom they do not 
know. This experimental feature of the University's 
Sunday program is made possible by the change in 
the hour of the University Service. The informal 
period in the Ballroom will last until 11 :30 a.m. 

Customarily, the University Service of Worship is 
broadcast through the facilities of Radio Station 
WDNC. During the summer months, this feature will 
be continued. The service will be taped at 9 :30 a.m. 
and will be broadcast at 11 :00 a.m. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
OPEN LECTURE BY PHILIP B. GOVE 

The Editor-in-Chief of Webster's Third New 
International Dictionary, Dr. Philip B. Gove, will 
address a luncheon meeting at the North Carolina 
Teachers of English Association on Friday, July 10th, 
at 1 :00 p.m. in the Union Ballroom. All those 
interested are cordially invited to attend. 



SUMMER ENTERTAINMENT SERIES 
BARTRON, AMERICAN PANTOMIMIST 

Bartron, the American Pantomimist, will be 
featured in the second performance of the Duke 
Summer Entertainment Series at 8 :00 p.m. on 
Wednesday, July 1st, in Page Auditorium. The 
public is invited to attend without charge. 

Active since childhood in all phases of theatrical 
endeavor, Mr. Harry Bartron studied at Xavier 
University in Cincinnati, Ohio, and later became a 
member for four years of the Uptown Players of 



Chicago both as actor and director. Continued study 
in dramatic technique and the dance ended in the 
realization of his life 's work, pantomime. During the 
early 1950 's, Mr. Bartron took part in the early 
phases of the now well established "off-Broadway" 
movement by presenting his pantomimes regularly at 
the Originals Only Playhouse. Then followed per- 
formances with the Schubert road production of ' ' The 
Student Prince; the New York revival of Philip 
Barry's "Here Come the Clowns" and "On the 
Carousel." Mr. Bartron has appeared in 36 states, 
in Canada and the British Isles. He has appeared on 
television over CBS network, the CBS in Toronto and 
BBC network. A member of the International Plat- 
form Association, the American Educational Theatre 
Association, and the National Catholic Theatre Con- 
ference, he is the author of forty original pantomines. 
Following the performance the audience is invited 
to an open house in the Union Ballroom where they 
can meet the artist and question him concerning his 
art form. 



Y.W.C.A. ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL PICNIC 

The Durham Y.W.C.A. will hold its annual inter- 
national picnic at the home of Dr. and Mrs. W. K. 
Cuvler on Garrett Road (turn right on Garrett Road 
off' Chapel Hill Road) on Sunday, June 28th at 4:30 
p.m. For details and transportation assistance, please 
call extension 2767. 



1964 SUMMER SESSION SOFTBALL LEAGUE 
(FIRST TERM) 

Date: Game: 

Tuesday, June 30th Economics vs. The Institute 
Chemistry vs. The Boomers 
Mets vs. Psychology-Sociology 

Thursday, July 2nd All-Star Practice 

Wednesday, July 1st — Card Gymnasium — Meeting of managers 
— Champion declared — All-Star team selected. 

Tuesday, July 7th — Champion vs. All-Star or League Play-off. 

Wednesday, July 8th — Banquet for Bunner-up team. 

Thursday, July 9th — Banquet of Champions. 

Special Notice 
All games pla3'ed on Tuesday and Thursday with 
starting time at 4 :30 p.m. All rain-out games played 
on following Monday and Wednesday. 



OPEN SEMINAR ON "SCIENCE AND 
CHRISTIAN FAITH: TOWARDS A REUNION" 

A non-credit seminar for the Summer Session, 
"Science and Christian Faith: Towards a Reunion," 
is being offered under the auspices of the Methodist 
Center on Thursday, July 2nd, and Thursday, 
July 9th, during the first term of the Summer 
Session. Leader of the Seminar will be Dr. Roger 
Pain, Professor of Biochemistry of the University 
of London. Dr. Pain, an articulate Christian 
layman, is currently doing research in Biochemistry 



at Duke. The seminars will be held in Building 10 
(Old Social Science Building, nest to Allen Building), 
in Room 237, from 7:00-9:00 p.m. The Seminar 
is open to all members of the University Community. 



LET'S GO SWIMMING 

Special mixed swimming parties may be scheduled 
by state clubs or by other student groups Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday nights. 



FRIDAY NIGHT OPEN HOUSE 

Every Friday evening during the first Summer 
Session, an informal open house will be held in Card 
Gymnasium during the hours of 8 :30-ll :30 p.m. The 
entertainment fare includes bridge, dancing, bad- 
minton, table tennis, and swimming. Refreshments 
will be served. No escort is needed and a cordial 
invitation is extended to all. 



NO CLASSES SATURDAY 
Summer Session classes will NOT meet on Satur- 
day, July 4th. 



DUKE PRESCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT 
There is an opening in the afternoon kindergarten 
(5-year old group) for 1964-65 of the Duke Preschool. 
Please contact the school secretary, Mrs. Silva, Ex- 
tension 4395, 1 :00-5 :00 p.m. and 7 :00-ll :00 p.m. or 
Miss Hinman, Director, 286-3382. 



DUKE SUMMER ENTERTAINMENTS 
An interesting and varied program of entertain- 
ments has been planned for the Summer Session to 
which the entire community is cordially invited. 
Sponsored by the Summer Sessions Office and Quad- 
rangle Pictures, the programs are being planned 
through the Student Activities Office. All the per- 
formances will be open to the public without charge. 

The schedule of entertainments are as follows: 
8:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 1st. Bartron, American Panto- 

mimist. Page Auditorium. 
8:15 p.m. Wednesday, July 8th. Piano Recital: Yoko 

Nozaki. Engineering Auditorium. 
8:15 p.m. Thursday, July 9th. Piano Recital by Susan Starr 

and Kenneth Amada. Page Auditorium. 
7:00 p.m. Sunday, July 19th. Outdoor Concert: The Folk- 
songs and Satire of Joe and Penny Aronson. West 
Campus Quadrangle. 
8:15 p.m. Thursday, July 23rd. Sonata Recital: Julia 
Mueller, Violin and Ruth Friedberg, Piano. Engineer- 
ing Auditorium. 

Besides these events Quadrangle Pictures will 
present Saturday evening showings of foreign films 
in Page Auditorium. Details for all programs and 
films will be carried in the summer calendar, The Duke 
Sundial. 



STUDENT UNION 
RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

The Student Union Game Room and Music Lounge 
will be open for use during the Summer Session. The 



Game Room, located in 02 Flowers Building, will be 
open from 1 :00 p.m. to 10 :00 p.m. Monday through 
Saturday for billiards and table tennis. The Music 
Lounge is located off the main lounge. Playing cards, 
chess sets, and checkers may be secured at the In- 
formation Center for use in the building. 



WESTMINSTER HOUSE HOSPITALITY 

Summer School students are invited to use the air- 
conditioned facilities of the Westminster House (the 
Presbyterian Student Center) on Alexander Avenue 
for study, reading and relaxation. The Center will be 
open Monday through Friday from 1 :00 p.m. until 
11 :00 p.m. 



PLAY HOURS 

Sports: badminton, volleyball, horseshoe pitching, 
croquet, and archery are included in the Recreation 
Program. Equipment for these activities is available 
in Card Gymnasium, from 2 :30 until 5 :30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. In addition to the above 
program, Intramural tournaments will be held for 
both men and women in handball, tennis, softball, and 
badminton. 



TERM I FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

Classes scheduled at: Examinations are: 

7:40- 9:00 a.m. daily Tues. July 14th, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

1:40- 3:00 p.m. daily Tues., July 14th, 1:40-4:40 p.m. 

9:20-10:40 a.m. daily Tues., July 14th, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 

11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m. daily Wed., July 15th, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

The examinations in four-semester hour science 
courses will be held in accordance with a schedule 
arranged by the department concerned. 

Examinations for all short term courses will be 
on the last scheduled class day. The instructor will 
make the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will not be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 



TERM II REGISTRATION 

Students who have pre-enrolled for Term II are 
urged to complete the entire process of registration 
between the hours of 9 :30 a.m. and 12 :00 noon and 
2 :00 to 4 :00 p.m. in the Summer Session Office, Room 
119 Allen Building, between July 6th and July 15th. 

Those students who have not pre-enrolled for 
Term II are urged to do so with their respective 
schools or colleges and then complete the registration 
as announced above. 

The Graduate School will accept registrants during 
the same hours and on the same dates as indicated 
above for the Summer Session Office. 

Students who complete their registration will not 
be required to appear on Registration Dav, Thursday, 
July 16th. 




THE SUNDIAL of 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 

JULY 5-11,1964 



Events of the Week 



SUNDAY, JULY 5 

8:30-9:00 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. Univer- 
sity Chapel. 
9:30-10:30 a.m. University Service of Worship. 
University Chapel. Presiding Minister: The 
Reverend A. Jack Wilson, III, Associate Direc- 
tor of Religions Activities. Preacher : The 
Reverend Dr. Thor Hall, Assistant Professor 
of Preaching and Theology, the Divinity 
School. Subject: "The Cost of Living." 

10:45-11:30 a.m. Chapel Social Hour. Union Ball- 
room. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC. 

6:30 p.m. Service of Holy Communion. West- 
minster House (the Presbyterian Student 
Center). Alexander Avenue. 

MONDAY, JULY 6 

2:00-3:00 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:30-5:30 p.m. Sports Play Hours. Card Gymna- 
sium. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by 
their own parents. 

TUESDAY, JULY 7 

12:30 p.m. Summer Luncheon for Education Stu- 
dents. Union Ballroom. 



2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:30-5:30 p.m. Sports Play Hours. Card Gymna- 
sium. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

4:30 p.m. Softball Game: Champion vs. All-Star 
or League Plav-Off. 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 8 

9:30 a.m. 1964 Piano Sessions Opening Meeting. 
Engineering Building Auditorium. (See Spe- 
cial Notice.) 

2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:30-5:30 p.m. Sports Play Hours. Card Gymna- 
sium. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
Banquet for Runner-up Baseball Team. 

8:15 p.m. 1964 Piano Session Recital : Yoko Nozaki. 
Auditorium of Engineering Building. 



THURSDAY, JULY 9 

2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:30-5:30 p.m. Sports Play Hours. Card Gymna- 
sium. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5:00 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Annual Summer Initia- 
tion and Picnic. Rear Grounds of Southgate 
and Gilbert-Addoms Dormitories. 

6:30-7:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. Univer- 
sity Chapel. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for The Sundial should be submitted in written form to 

Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later than 1:00 p.m. 

Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



7:00-9:00 p.m. Open Seminar on "Science and 
Christian Faith : Towards a Reunion. ' ' Room 
237 Building- 10. Speaker: Dr. Roger Pain. 
Banquet for Baseball Champions. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty mem- 
bers and their families. Faculty children will 
be admitted only when accompanied by their 
parents. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Summer Entertainment Series: 
Concert by Susan Starr and Kenneth Amada, 
Pianists. Page Auditorium. Reception follow- 
ing. Flowers Lounge. 



FRIDAY, JULY 10 

1 :00 p.m. Luncheon for N. C. Teachers of English 
Association. Speaker: Dr. Philip B. Gove. 
Union Ballroom. 

2:00-3:30 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:30 p.m. Scientific Lecture. Auditorium of the 
Army Research Building. 

2:30-5:30 p.m. Sports Play Hours. Card Gymna- 
sium. 

2:30 p.m. General Session: N. C. Teachers of Eng- 
lish Association. Auditorium, Biological Sci- 
ences Building. Panelists : Dr. Philip B. Gove 
and others. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

8:30-11:30 p.m. Summer Session Friday Night 
Open House. Card Gymnasium. 



SATURDAY, JULY 11 

2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:30-5:30 p.m. Sports Play Hours. Card Gymna- 
sium. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Lucky Jim," a Boulting Broth- 
ers Hilarious Comedj r starring Ian Car- 
michael, Terry Thomas, Hugh Griffith and 
introducing Sharon Acker. A rollicking lam- 
poon of university high (and low) life ! 



CHAPEL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The preacher who is scheduled to deliver the 

sermon at the University Service of Worship on 

Sunday, July 12th is the Reverend Dr. Howard C. 

Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. The service 



will commence at 9 :30 a.m. and will be concluded at 
10:30 a.m. 

Following the University Service of Worship each 
Sunday, the congregation is invited to go directly to 
the Union Ballroom, on the second floor of the Union 
Building, for an informal period of fellowship and 
discussion. The Ballroom is air-conditioned. Mem- 
bers of the congregation will have opportunity to ask 
questions pertaining to the Chapel sermon and to 
meet other members of the congregation whom they 
do not know. This experimental feature of the 
University's Sunday program is made possible by the 
change in the hour of the University Service. The 
informal period in the Ballroom will last until 11 :30 
a.m. 

Customarily, the University Service of Worship is 
broadcast tli rough the facilities of Radio Station 
WDNC. During the summer months, this feature 
will be continued. The service will be taped at 9 -.30 
a.m. and will be broadcast at 11 :00 a.m. 



1964 PIANO SESSIONS 

The Seventh Annual Piano Sessions, under the 
direction of Loren Withers, Director of Piano Studies, 
Duke University Department of Music, will be held 
on July 8th, 9th, and 10th in the Engineering Build- 
ing Auditorium. The regular sessions will convene 
each day at 9 :30 a.m. until 12 noon and from 1 :30 
until 4 :30 p.m. 

Recitals by Susan Starr, Kenneth Amada, and 
Yoko Nozaki will highlight the Sessions and are 
open to the public without charge as part of the 
Summer Sessions Entertainment Series. Miss Nozaki, 
gifted sixteen year old student of Loren Withers and 
current winner of the North Carolina Symphony 
Junior Soloist Auditions will be heard in a full pro- 
gram on Wednesday evening, July 8th at 8 :15 p.m. 
in the Engineering Auditorium. Included on her 
program are : 

PRELUDE AND FUGUE IN G MINOR WTC I Bach 
SONATA IN D MINOR, OP. 31, NO. 2 Beethoven 

ETUDE IN C SHARP MINOR, OP. 25, NO. 7 Chopin 
ETUDE IN G FLAT, OP. 10, NO. 5 ("Black Key") Chopin 

CHILDREN'S CORNER SUITE Debussy 

CONSOLATION NO. 3 IN D-FLAT Liszt 

PAGANINI ETUDE NO. 3 IN G-SHARP MINOR Liszt 
"La Campanella" 

Composer-pianist Richard Trevarthen, currently 
visiting professor of Music at Duke, will lecture on 
the essentials of good materials from the composer's 
viewpoint. 



KAPPA DELTA PI 
SUMMER INITIATION AND PICNIC 

Kappa Delta Pi, education honorary, will hold its 
annual summer initiation at 5 :00 p.m., Thursday, July 
9th, in Room 125 Allen Building. The annual picnic 
for all students in Education courses and their guests 
will be held immediately following the initiation on 
the grounds to the rear of Southgate and Gilbert- 
Addoms Dormitories on the Woman's College Campus. 
A feature will be the horseshoe tourney, with Profes- 
sors Bolmeier and Reynolds defending their champion- 
ship titles. 

Those planning to attend are requested to sign 
the list in the Summer Session Office ; cost per plate : 
$1.75. 



DUKE SUMMER SESSIONS ENTERTAINMENT 
SERIES 

On Thursday evening, July 9th, the Duke S.S.E.S. 
and the Department of Music will present Susan Starr 
and Kenneth Amada, brilliant young pianists of 
international prominence, in the major recital of the 
Piano Sessions in Page Auditorium at 8 :15 p.m. 
Mr. and Mrs. Amada will each perform solo works 
and will combine their talents in presenting work for 
four hands. They will also participate in the work- 
shop sessions. 

Their program follows : 

ALLEGRO BRILLIANTE, OP. 96 Mendelssohn 

Susan Starr and Kenneth Amada 
SONATA IN F MINOR, OP. 57, "APPASSIONATA" 

Beethoven 
Kenneth Amada 
SONATA (1918) Poulene 

Prelude 
Rustique 
Finale 

Susan Starr and Kenneth Amada 

INTERMISSION 
FANTASY IN F MINOR, OP. 103 Schubert 

Allegro Molto Moderato, Largo, Allegro, Vivace, Allegro 
Molto Moderato 

Susan Starr and Kenneth Amada 
VARIATIONS AND FUGUE ON A THEME BY HANDEL 

Brahms 
Susan Starr 
FOUR HUNGARIAN DANCES Brahms 

Susan Starr and Kenneth Amada 

An informal reception honoring the artists, the 
director and participants of the Piano "Workshop, 
will follow the concert in Flowers Lounge. The 
audience is invited to attend. 



SCIENTIFIC LECTURE 

A lecture on "Some Electromagnetic Backscatter- 
ing Experiments" will be presented by Professor D. 
J. Angelakos of the University of California, 
Berkeley at 2:30 p.m., Friday, July 10th, in the 
Auditorium of the Army Research Building. Re- 
freshments will be served during the preceding 
half-hour, beginning at 2 :00 p.m. 



DR. PHILIP GOVE TO LECTURE 

On Friday, July 10th, Duke University will be host 
to the North Carolina Teachers of English Associa- 
tion. The events of particular interest (open to any- 
one who is interested in attending) will be a talk at 
the luncheon meeting by Dr. Philip B. Gove, Editor- 
in-Chief of Merriam- Webster Dictionaries (and of 
Webster's Third International, which has occasioned a 
great deal of debate since its publication in 1962) and 
a panel discussion in the afternoon, in which Dr. 
Gove will participate. 

The luncheon will be held in the Union Ballroom 
at 1 :00 p.m. (price $1.50 per plate, payable at door). 
The title of his address is "The Words We Use." 
The panel discussion will occur in the Auditorium of 
the Biological Sciences Building at 2 :30 p.m. 

Anyone wishing to attend the luncheon is asked to 
telephone the English Department (Extension 2741) 
requesting a reservation by July 8th. Anyone in- 
terested is cordially invited to attend. 



TERM I FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

Classes scheduled at: Examinations are: 

7:40- 9:00 daily Tuesday, July 14th, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

1:40- 3:00 daily Tuesday, July 14th, 1:40-4:40 p.m. 

9:20-10:40 daily Tuesday, July 14th, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 

11:00-12:20 daily Wednesday, July 15th, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

The examinations in four-semester hour science 
courses will be held in accordance with a schedule 
arranged by the department concerned. 

Examinations for all short-term courses will be on 
the last scheduled class day. The instructor will 
make the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal card 
or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will not be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 



TERM II REGISTRATION 

Students who have pre-enrolled for Term II are 
urged to complete the entire process of registration 
between the hours of 9 :30 a.m. to 12 :00 noon and 
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Summer Session Office, 
Room 119, Allen Building, between July 6th and 
July 15th. 

Those students who have not pre-enrolled for 
Term II are urged to do so with their respective 
schools or colleges and then complete the registration 
as announced above. 

The Graduate School will accept registrants dur- 



ing the same hours and on the same dates as indicated 
above for the Summer Session Office. 

Students who complete their registration will not 
be required to appear on Registration Day, Thursday, 
July 16th. 



DUKE ENTERTAINMENT CHANGE 
The Sonata Recital of Julia Mueller and Ruth 
Friedberg scheduled for Thursday, July 23rd, has 
been changed to Tuesday, July 28th because of an 
unforeseen conflict. 



WEEK OF 



Sept. 20-26, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Sept. 20-26, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, September 20 

9:30 a.m. Interdenominational and Interfaith As- 
sembly. Page Auditorium. Participants : Dr. 
Henry Fairbanks, Miss Charlotte A. Bunch, 
Mr. Albert E. Benjamin, Mr. Philip Lader. 
Moderator : The Reverend Jack W. Carroll. 
9:30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Doctor 
Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the Uni- 
versity. Sermon: "What We Do Here." 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 
3:30-5:30 p.m. The President's Reception honor- 
ing new students. 2138 Campus Drive. 
7:15 p.m. Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A. "Vespers in 
Word and Song." Alice M. Baldwin Audito- 
rium. Meditation: Dr. Thomas McCollough, 
Assistant Professor of Religion. 

Monday, September 21 

9:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. John Frank- 
lin Piper, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Library Conference Room. 

5:15-6:30 p.m. Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A. Picnic and 
Lawn Concert for all new students. Front of 
Woman's College Union. 

7:30 p.m. Faculty Critique. Alice M. Baldwin 
Auditorium. Speaker: Dr. Warren Lerner. 



Tuesday, September 22 

2:00 and 9:00 p.m. Duke Players Performances of 
"A Phoenix Too Frequent." Alice M. Bald- 
win Auditorium. 

7:30 p.m. Student Activities Night. Page Audito- 
rium. Mr. William J. Griffith, presiding. 

8:30-10:00 p.m. Student Activities Open Houses. 

Flowers and Union Buildings. 
10:00-11:30 p.m. Student Union Combo Party hon- 
oring Class of 1968. Kilgo Quadrangle. 

Wednesday, September 23 

1:00 p.m. Forum: "Our Responsibility." Room 
201 East Duke Building. Speaker: Dr. Anne 
Scott. 

3:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Andrew 
Quarles Blane for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Library Conference Room. 

7:00-8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Lucky Jim," with Ian Car- 
michael, Terry Thomas, and Hugh Griffith, is 
a rollicking lampoon of university life by the 
Boulting Brothers, Britain's most successful 
laugh-inakers. ' ' They '11 laugh their heads off — 
and think a little, too ! ' ' — N. Y. Post. Also the 
short, "Running, Jumping, Standing Still," 
with Peter Sellars. 
(Free film for all new students.) 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



Thursday, September 24 

8:10 a.m. Fall Semester Classes Begin. 

11:00 a.m. All-University Convocation. Indoor 
Stadium. Speaker: President Douglas M. 
Knight. 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. John 
Stephen Roberts for the Ph.D. degree in 
Zoology. Room 225 Biological Sciences Build- 
ing. 

3:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Philip 
Joseph Traci for the Ph.D. degree in English. 
Room 323 Allen Building. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-204 Medical Center. Speaker: Dr. 
George Hodgson. 

4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 



Friday, September 25 

9:30 a.m. The final examination of Mr. Peter Wil- 
liam Hochachka for the Ph.D. degree in Zool- 
ogy. Room 225 Biological Sciences Building. 

3:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Albert 
Mark John Hyatt for the Ph.D. degree in 
History. Room 117 Allen Building. 

7:30 p.m. Church Night Program for All New 
Students. Local Churches and Religious 
Centers. 



Saturday, September 26 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Craven 
Allen Burris for the Ph.D. degree in History. 
Room 234 Allen Building. 

2:00 pjn. Varsity Football: Duke versus Virginia. 
Stadium. 

4:15 p.m. Student Union Open House. "West Quad- 
rangle. 

6:00-8:00 p.m. Student Union Major Attraction: 
"Bitter End Singers." Indoor Stadium. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Lucky Jim," with Ian Car- 
michael, Terry Thomas, and Hugh Griffith, is 
a rollicking lampoon of university life by the 
Boulting Brothers, Britain's most successful 
laugh-makers. "They'll laugh their heads 
off— and think a little, too !"— N. Y. Post. Also 
the short, "Running, Jumping, Standing Still," 
with Peter Sellars. 

8:00 p.m. International House-warming Party. 
International House on Campus Drive. 

8:00-Midnight Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A. Freshman 
Dance. Card Gymnasium. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chap- 
lain to the University, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship on Sunday, September 
20th, at 11:00 a.m. in the University Chapel. His 
siibject will be "What We Do Here." The order 
of service follows: 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean 
of the Chapel, Presiding Minister. 

Opening Organ Voluntary — Chorale in A minor Cesar Franch 
Call to Worship — The Reverend A. Jack Wilson, Associate 

Director of Eeligious Activities, West Campus. 
Hymn— "O God, Our Help in Ages Past" William Croft 

Prayer of Confession — The Reverend W. Robert Mill, Chaplain 

to Episcopal Students. 
Words of Forgiveness — The Reverend William R. Patton, 

Chaplain to Lutheran Students. 
The Lord 's Prayer — Led by Miss Ann Rowe, Associate Director 

of Religious Activities, East Campus. 
Anthem — "Now God Be Praised in Heav'n Above" Yulpius 
Old Testament Lesson — Mieah 6:6-8 — The Reverend Robert P. 

Hyatt, Chaplain to Baptist. Students 
Hymn — "I Love Thy Kingdom, Lord" 

From Williams' Psalmody 
Call to Prayer 
A Litany of Youth 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Voluntary 

Offertory — "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
New Testament Lesson — Mark 9:33-42 — The Reverend Cran- 

ford Johnson, Assistant Chaplain to Methodist Students 
Sermon — "What We Do Here" 
Prayer 
Benediction — The Reverend Jack W. Carroll, 

Methodist Students. 
Choral Response — "Sevenfold Amen" 
The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — Piece Heroique 

The preacher who is scheduled to 
sermon at the University Service of Worship next 
Sunday, September 27th, is the Reverend Professor 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel and James B. 
Duke Professor of Preaching, in the Divinitv School. 



Chaplain to 
Stainer 

Cesar Franch 
deliver the 



FALL REGISTRATION 

Monday, September 21 — Freshmen Registration, Indoor Sta- 
dium. 8:30 a.m.-12:00 Noon and 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Tuesday, September 22 — Registration for all new graduate 
students, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, 127 Allen. 
9:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon and 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Wednesday, September 23 — General Registration for all pre- 
registered upperelassmen, Indoor Stadium. 9:00 a.m.-12:00 
Noon and 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. 

N.B. All returning upperelassmen (Trinity College, College 
of Engineering, Woman's College, School of Nursing) must 
report to their respective Deans Office between the hours of 
9:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. to be cleared for classes. Failure to 
be cleared for classes will cause a student's course schedule to 
be cancelled. 



ALL-UNIVERSITY CONVOCATION 

For the first time since Duke University was es- 
tablished on the foundations of Trinity College, the 
academic year will open with an all-University Con- 



vocation. For very nearly the first time, if not the 
first time, members of the administration, faculty, 
and students from all of the University's graduate 
and undergraduate schools and colleges will have an 
opportunity to meet as one Duke community to 
renew their dedication to that pursuit of truth and 
extension of human knowledge which throughout 
history has been the core of every university worthy 
of the name. 

The Convocation will be held at eleven o'clock in 
the Indoor Stadium on the first day of classes, on 
Thursday, September 24th. It will begin with a formal 
academic procession in which over three hundred 
members of the faculty and administration as well 
as the class and student government presidents of 
all of the schools and colleges expect to participate. 
President Knight will be the speaker. 

The first two classes will meet as usual on Sep- 
tember 24th; third and fourth period classes have 
been cancelled to permit all members of the faculty 
and students to be present at the Convocation. To 
allow other members of the community to attend, 
libraries, bookshops, dining-halls (except at the 
Medical Center) and dope shops will be closed. Din- 
ing-halls will re-open at approximately 12:00 o'clock. 
Classes will be resumed beginning with the fifth 
period. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Franklin 
Piper, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be 
held on Monday, September 21st, at 9 :00 a.m. in the 
Library Conference Room. The subject of Mr. Piper's 
dissertation is "The Social Policy of the Federal 
Council of the Churches of Christ in America During 
World War I." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Waldo Beach, Stuart Henry, Ray 
C. Petry, and Richard Watson. Professor Beach will 
preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Andrew Quarles 
Blane for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held 
on Wednesday, September 23rd, at 3 :00 p.m. in the 
Library Conference Room. The subject of Mr. Blane 's 
dissertation is "The Relations Between The Russian 
Protestant Sects and The State, 1900-1921." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Waldo Beach, Creighton Lacy, 
Egil Grislis, Wladyslaw Kulski, and John Curtiss. 
Professor Beach will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Stephen 
Roberts for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology will be held 
on Thursday, September 24th, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 



225 Biological Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. 
Roberts' dissertation is "The Correlation of Renal 
Ultrastructure with Salt and Water Handling by the 
Kidneys of Three Lacertilian Reptiles." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors Bodil Schmidt-Nielsen, John R. Gregg, 
Edward C. Horn, Henry Kamin, and Montrose J. 
Moses. Professor Schmidt-Nielsen will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Philip Joseph Traci 
for the Ph.D. degree in English will be held on 
Thursday, September - 24th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 
323 Allen Building. The subject of Mr. Traci 's dis- 
sertation, is "The Love Play of Antony and Cleo- 
patra." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors John L. Lievsay, Holger Olof Nygard, 
S. K. Heninger, and Ernest W. Nelson. Professor 
Lievsay will preside. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND 
PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 
will hold a seminar on Thursday, September 24th, 
at 4 :00 p.m. in Room M-204 Duke University Medical 
Center. Dr. George Hodgson, Director of the Insti- 
tute of Sciences, Universidad De Chile, will speak 
on "Effect of Erythropoetin on Radiosensitivity of 
Erythropoetic Tissue." 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Peter William Hoch- 
achka for the Ph.D. degree in Zoology will be held 
on Friday, September 25th, at 9 :30 a.m. in Room 225 
Biological Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. 
Hochachka's dissertation is "Metabolic Adaptation 
in a Lower Vertebrate : The Isoenzymes of Lactic 
Dehydrogenase in the Goldfish, Carassius carassius." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors K. M. Wilbur, D. J. Fluke, J. R. Gregg, 
Bodil Schmidt-Nielsen, and R. W. Wheat. Professor 
Wilbur will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Albert Mark John 
Hyatt for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held 
on Friday, September 25th, at 3 :00 p.m. in Room 117 
Allen Building. The subject of Mr. Hyatt's disserta- 
tion is "The Military Career of Sir Arthur Currie." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Theodore Ropp, Harold T. Parker, 
Richard L. Watson, Jr., and Louis Budd. Professor 
Ropp will preside. 



DENOMINATIONAL "CHURCH NIGHT" 
Friday, September 25 

BAPTIST: Church Night: Baptist students (grad- 
uate and undergraduate) and faculty are cordially 
invited to a supper honoring new Baptist students at 
the Baptist Student Center on Alexander Avenue, 
just off Campus Drive, at 6:00 P.M. Sunday, Sept. 
27: Rides to local Baptist churches will be provided, 
leaving from the Baptist Student Center at 9 :30 A.M. 
Coffee and donuts will be served at the Center prior 
to departure. 

CATHOLIC: Church Night: 7:00 P.M., Benediction 
in the Church (810 W. Chapel Street), foUowed at 
7 :30 P.M., by a reception for new students in the 
school auditorium. The Graduate Student-Faculty 
Newman Society will meet, following the Benediction, 
in the meeting room of the Church. The topic will be, 
"Vatican II — Impact and Implications: Vernacular 
in the Sacraments." 

EPISCOPAL: Church Night: An evening of Folk 
Music and Jazz, at 6 :00 P.M., in the Episcopal Student 
Center on Alexander Avenue. All members of the 
University community are welcome. Sept. 27, 9 :15 
A.M., Holy Communion (Chapel of St. Michael at the 
Episcopal Center). 

LUTHERAN: Church Night: A reeeption to wel- 
come Lutheran sudents will be held at Grace Lutheran 
Church, corner of Buchanan and Green Streets, at 
6 :00 P.M. Sunday, Sept. 27, 6 :30 P.M., A Commun- 
ion service will be held in the East Duke Chapel, 
followed by an informal coffee hour which will pro- 
vide an opportunity for becoming familiar with the 
1964-65 Lutheran Student Association program. 

METHODIST: Church Night: A reception to wel- 
come Methodist students will be held at the Methodist 
Student Center at 6 :00 P.M. Sunday, Sept. 27, 9 :00 
A.M., Initial meeting of seminars: "The Congrega- 
tion in Mission, "Jackson W. Carroll, leader; "A 
Dialogue: Christian Faith and Culture," Franklin 
Ingram, leader. These seminars are open to all in- 
terested persons in the University community. They 
will meet weekly during the semester. Coffee and 
donuts will be served beginning at 9 :00. The seminars 
will begin at 9 :30, lasting for one hour. For further 
information, call 286-9230. Sept. 27, 6:15 P.M., 
Evening Prayer, followed by an informal fellowship 
hour. 

PRESBYTERIAN: Church Night: Reception for 
Presbyterian Students at Westminster House (Pres- 
bvterian Student Center on Alexander Avenue), at 
6*:00 P.M. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: 

Church Night: All students from the denominations 
sponsoring the United Campus Christian Fellowship 
(United Church of Christ, Disciples of Christ, United 
Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., Evangelical 
United Brethren and Moravian) are invited to a get- 



acquainted supper at the Durham Congregational 
Christian Church at 6 :15 P.M. Transportation will be 
provided by a special bus which will leave Hanes 
House at 6:00 P.M. and will proceed to the Chapel 
steps on West and the bus stop on East. 

The first regular meeting of the U.C.C.F. will be 
held on Sunday, September 27, at the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. Robert Bonar. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council will meet on Thursday, 
September 24th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. The Council will elect officers for 1964- '65. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Craven Allen Burris 
for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Satur- 
day, September 26th, at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 234 Allen 
Building. The subject of Mr. Burris' dissertation 
is "Arthur James Balfour as a Political Leader: 
Party, Power, and the Constitution, 1891-1905." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors William B. Hamilton. Harold T. 
Parker, Charles Young, and William Hull. Professor 
Hamilton will preside. 



STUDENT UNION PRESENTS 
"THE BITTER END SINGERS" 

The Major Attractions Committee of the Duke 
University Student Union will present "The Bitter 
End Singers" on Saturday, September 26th, at 6:30 
p.m. in the Indoor Stadium. "The Bitter End Sing- 
ers," a new folk-singing group composed of three 
boys and three girls, immediately drew rave notices 
on their debut this summer at the Bitter End Club in 
New York City. Their first album will be released 
soon under Mercury Records. General admission 
tickets are $1.00 for single admission and $1.50 for a 
dating couple and will go on sale Monday, September 
21st, on the Main Quadrangle. Tickets will also be 
available at the door of the Indoor Stadium on the 
evening of the performance. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY FALL SEMESTER 
ACTIVITIES CALENDAR 

Copies of the Duke University Fall Semester 
Activities Calendar will be mailed to all faculty 
and staff members by the last of September. All 
graduate and undergraduate students will have 
copies delivered to dormitory rooms. Copies may 
also be secured at the Information Desk in Flowers 
Lounge. 



CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS 

The Chamber Arts Society announces the follow- 
ing six concerts for the 196-1-65 season : 

Saturday, October 31 — Beaux Arts Trio 
Saturday, November 21 — Hungarian Quartet 
Saturday, December 5 — Drolc Quartet (Berlin) 
Saturday, February 13 — Pasquier Trio (Paris) 
Saturday, March 13 — Juilliard Quartet 
Saturday, April 17 — Fine Arts Quartet 

These concerts will be held in the Music Room, East 
Duke Building, beginning at 8:15 p.m. Admission: 
Membership in the Chamber Arts Society is open to 
all persons, and entitles to admission to all concerts. 
The cost of membership will be $12.00. The Com- 
mittee of the Society limits membership to 330 persons, 
the remaining 70 admissions being available to indi- 
viduals who purchase Guest Cards for single concerts 
at price of $2.50. These Guest Cards may be ob- 
tained at the door of the Music Room on concert 
evenings from 7 :30 p.m. to 8 :00 p.m. For tickets, 
contact Dr. Ernest Nelson (address Box 6065, College 
Station, Durham, N. C). 



1964-65 ARTISTS SERIES 

Season tickets priced at $8.00, $9.00, and $10.00 
are available in Room 202-A Flowers Building. A 
check payable to Duke University Artists Series 
should accompany orders and should be mailed to 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, North Carolina. 
Call 681-0111, Extension 2911, for further informa- 
tion. The concerts will be held in Page Auditorium 
at 8 :15 p.m. on the indicated dates, with the exception 
of the BBC Symphony Orchestra Concert which will 
be held in the Indoor Stadium. 

The 1964-65 Series is as follows: 

LEONARD KOSE, Cellist Monday, November 30 

Rose, who plays a rare Amati cello dating from 1662, is 
acclaimed as one of the true virtuosos of that instrument. He 
is sought after at home and abroad for concerts and has 
recorded a veritable library of great cello music. Critics have 
said that "Hose is another name for perfection in the art of 
cello." 

' ' I consider Leonard Pose the superlative cellist of today. ' ' 
. . . Dimitri Mitropoulos 

AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE Thursday, December 10 

America 's oldest and most honored native ballet company, 
the American Ballet Theatre has toured more than any company 
in history, has developed the largest repertoire of both 
classical and contemporary ballets, and has discovered and 
developed more dancers, choreographers, designers and com- 
posers than any other company. In its 24 years it has pro- 
duced 103 ballets, of which 32 were world premieres and 
another 29 were premiered in the company's experimental 
workshop. Its widely acclaimed tours abroad in 37 countries 
have earned the company the title of "America's No. 1 Cultural 
Export. ' ' 

THE GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATRE 

Friday, February 12 
Donizetti's "Don Pasquale" 
By popular request Boris Goldovsky brings his Opera 
Theatre to Duke for the third consecutive year. "Don 
Pasquale ' ' is opera buff a at its best and is considered by many 
to be Donizetti 's finest work. The opera will be presented 
in English with a company of 50 including orchestra and 
chorus, fully staged with handsome sets and costumes. 



JOHN OGDON, Pianist Thursday, February 18 

Mr. Ogdon was co-winner of the Tchaikowsky International 
Piano Competition in 1962. He was immediately invited to 
tour the Soviet Union and this past season the talented young 
Briton made a highly acclaimed American debut tour. 

" . . . a huge talent. ' ' New York Tribune 

' ' A name destined to resound in the music of our time. ' ' 
Saturday Review 

.: - - '. - 

BBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Tuesday, May 4 

Formed in 1930, the BBC Symphony Orchestra is one of 
the world's most famous. Achieving prominence under its 
first conductor Sir Adrian Boult, its fame continued under the 
leadership of Sir Malcolm Sargent and Rudolf Schwartz. 
Though the orchestra at present has no permanent conductor, 
Antal Dorati was appointed in 1963 as Chief Conductor until 
1966. The 96-member orchestra is the main broadcasting 
orchestra of the BBC London studios, plays a noted winter 
series of concerts at Royal Festival Hall and is the mainstay 
of London 's Henry Wood Promenade Concerts each summer 
which attract over a quarter of a million persons per year. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

1964 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

AND TICKET PRICES 





AT HOME 


PRICES 




Time 




Family 




Date P.M. 


Opponent Regular 


Plan 


Children 


Sept. 26—2:00 


Virginia .... $4.50 


$2.50 


$ .75 


Oct. 10—2:00 


Maryland .... 4.50 


2.50 


.75 


Oet. 17—2:00 


N. C. State . . 4.50 


2.50 


.75 


Oct. 31—2:00 


Georgia Tech* 5.00 


2.50 


.75 


*Homeeoming 









Date 


Time 


Sept. 


19—8 


00 


Oct. 


3—2 


00 


Oct. 


94 o 


00 


Nov. 


7—2 


00 


Nov. 


14—1 


30 


Nov. 


21—1 


30 



SEASON TICKETS- 
PREFERRED LOCATION «i6 00 

FAMILY PLAN (ADULT) ' " ' g'oo 

(child) ; 3 ; 00 

(FACULTY) 4.00 



AWAY 
Opponent price 

South Carolina $4.65 

Tulane 5.00 

U. S. Military Academy 5.00 

Wake Forest 4.00 

U. S. Naval Academy . 5.00 

Univ. of North Carolina 4.50 



FAMILY PLAN 

To make it possible for Family Groups to attend 
games at a reduced price, the Duke Athletie Asso- 
ciation is continuing this year, a Family Plan for 
tickets. Under this PLAN, a section of end zone seats 
has been set aside for sale as SEASON tickets to 
adults at $8.00 each and to children (high school age 
and under) at $3.00 each for the four home games. 
Thus, a family of four can attend ALL four of Duke's 
home games at a total cost of $22.00. Tickets for 
individual games in this family plan area will be 
priced at $2.50 each for adults and 75c each for 
children. All seats will be RESERVED. 



MEAL HOURS— MEN'S DINING HALLS 



Weekly Meal Hodks 
Cafeterias: 



Sunday Hours 
Cafeterias: 



Breakfast 

Lunch 

Dinner 

'Snack Bar: 
Oak Room: 
Lunch 
Dinner 



7:00- 9:30 a.m. 

11:00- 2:00p.m. 

5:00- 7:00 p.m. 

9 = 30-11:00 a.m. 



11:30- 

5:00- 



2:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 



Breakfast 

Lunch 

Dinner 



Oak Boom: 

Lunch 

Dinner 



8:30-11 :00 a.m. 

11:30- 2:00 p.m. 

5:00- 7:00 p.m. 



11:30- 2:00 p.m. 
5:00- 7:00 p.m. 



MEAL HOURS— WOMAN'S COLLEGE 



DINING 

Weekly Meal Hours 
Breakfast 7:15- 8:45 a.m. 

Lunch 11:15- 1:30 p.m. 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 p.m. 



HALLS 

Sunday Hours 
Breakfast 8:30 



Lunch 
Dinner 



9:30 a.m. 
11:30- 1:30 p.m. 
5:00- 6:15 p.m. 



MEAL HOURS— GRADUATE CENTER 
DINING HALLS 



Weekly Meal Hours 
Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 a.m 

Lunch 11:15- 1:30 p.m. 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 p.m. 

Coffee Lounge: 11:30 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. 



Sunday Hours 
Breakfast Bar Onlv 

8 :30"-ll :00 a.m. 



LIBRARY HOURS 



GENERAL LIBRARY 



Main Loan Desk 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 


8:00a.m.-ll:00p.m. 
8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m.-ll:00 p.m. 


Graduate Reading Room 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 


8:00a.m.-12:00M 
8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 
l:30-p.m.-12:00M 


Undergraduate Reading Room 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 


8:00a.m.-12:00M 

8:00a.m.-10:30p.m. 

l:30p.m.-12:00M 


Periodicals Room 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 


8:00 a.m.-ll :00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 
1 : 30 p.m.-ll :00 p.m. 


Newspaper Room 
Monday-Friday 

Saturday 
Sunday 


8:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

6:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m. 

8:30 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. 

Closed 


Manuscript Department and Rare Books Department 

Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.- 5 : 00 p.m. 
Saturday 8:30 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. 
Sunday Closed 


Public Documents Room 
Monday-Friday 

Saturday 
Sunday 


8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. 

8:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

Closed 


Reference Department 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 


8:00a.m.-ll:00p.m. 
8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. 



WOMAN'S COLLEGE LIBRARY 

Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 

SCHEDULES for school, college and departmental libraries 
are posted in each library. 



FALL SEMESTER CHAPEL PREACHING 
SCHEDULE 

September 20 — Freshman Sunday — Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson — 

Chaplain to the University 
September 27 — Opening Sunday — Dr. James T. Cleland — Dean 

of the Chapel 
October 4 — World Wide Communion — Dean Cleland 
October 11 — Dr. Waldo Beach 
October 18 — Dad's Day — Dr. Creighton Lacy — Professor of 

World Christianity 
October 25 — Dr. Eugene Smith — Executive Director, World 

Council of Churches 

1 — Chaplain Wilkinson 

8 — Dr. Benjamin E. Mays — President, Morehouse 



November 
November 

College 
November 

College 
November 22 
November 29 
December 6- 

School 
December 
December 



15 — Dean James L. Price, Jr. — Dean, Trinity 



—Dean Cleland 

—Thanksgiving Recess 

-Dr. Robert E. Cushman — Dean, 



The Divinity 



13- 

20- 



-Christmas Sunday — Dean Cleland 
-Christmas Recess 
December 27 — Christmas Recess 
January 3 — Christmas Recess 
January 10 — Dr. Hugh Anderson 

Criticism and Theology 
January 17 — Chaplain Wilkinson 
January 24 — Dr. D. T. Niles — General 

Christian Conference 
January 31 — Dean Cleland 



Professor of Biblical 



Secretary, East Asia 



DUKE PRESCHOOL OPENING 

Duke Preschool has an opening- in the afternoon 
class for 4 and 5 year olds. If interested, please 
contact Miss Hinman at 286-3382 or Mrs. Silva, 
University extension 4395. 



GOTHIC BOOKSHOP 

The Gothic Bookshop, located by Page Audi- 
torium, now greatly enlarged, is the campus trade 
bookshop and browsing headquarters. Here you will 
find the best of current and standard hard-rover books, 
as well as more than four thousand quality paper- 
back titles, prints, and sculptures. A great many 
excellent books, both new and used, have been reduced 
by 40% to 80% in price to celebrate the opening of 
our new premises. 



1964-65 ART EXHIBITIONS 

The members of the University Community are 
extended a cordial invitation to visit the continuous 
showing of art exhibitions being held in the Gallery 
of the Woman's College Library and the Lounge of 
the West Union Building during the hours of 8 :30 
a.m. until 10:00 p.m. daily. Under the sponsorship of 
the Art Department on East and the Student Union 
Pine Arts Committee on West, the exhibits are open 
to the public without charge. 

The exhibitions now on display include, on West, 
"Prize Winning American Prints" from the Pratt 
Graphic Art Center and, on East, "Chiaroscuro 
Woodcuts" from the Binet Print Collection. 



"WEEKLY CALENDAR INFORMATION 

This is the first issue of the University Weekly 
Calendar of Duke University for the academic year 
1964-65. Hereafter, the Calendar will appear every 
Saturday morning. 

Members of the faculty and staff are requested 
to have notices for publication in the Calendar in 
Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not 
later than 1 :00 p.m. on Wednesday. This is abso- 
lutely necessary in order that the Calendar may be 
handled by the printers and be ready for distribu- 
tion early Saturday morning. 

Distribution of the Calendar to faculty, staff, 
graduate and undergraduate students will be 
handled in the following fashion : 

Faculty — Copies to departmental offices unless 
an individual office is in another building in which 
case the office will receive a copy. 

Staff — Copies to various Administrative offices 
and to individual staff offices. 

Graduate Students — Copies to departmental 
offices. 

Undergraduate Students — Copies to dormitories 
for posting purposes only. 

Hospital Faculty and Staff — Copies to Hospital 
Post Office for distribution via individual boxes. 

Further clarification may be obtained by calling 
Extension 2911. 



INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 
HOUSEWARMING PARTY 

The International Housewarming Party on Sat- 
urday, Sept. 26th marks the formal opening of the 
new International House on Campus Drive which 
will contain the Office of International Students, 
directed by Mrs. Reba Hall, as well as provide a 
place for informal gatherings of international stu- 
dents, American students, faculty and townspeople. 
Any interested person is cordially invited to attend 
this and subsequent "open houses." 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
ZOOLOGY AND BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Zoology and Botany Departments will hold 
their weekly seminar on Monday, September 28th, in 
the Auditorium of the Biological Sciences Building 
at 4 :15 p.m. Dr. Klaus Schmidt-Koenig, Research 
Associate, Department of Zoology, will speak "On 
Bird Orientation: Experiments and Problems." 
Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

FALL HONORS ASSEMBLY 

The traditional Fall Honors Assembly of The 
Woman's College will take place on Monday, Septem- 
ber 28 at 7:30 p.m. in the Baldwin Auditorium. Dr. 
Fay Ajzenberg-Selove, nuclear physicist and Professor 
of Physics at Haverford College, will be the principal 
speaker. Aware that the audience will be composed 
largely of non-physicists, Professor Selove will address 
herself to the topic, "The Particle Zoo" — a title which 
leads us to hope that she will identify the lions and 
the tigers, as well as the lesser animals, in this 
particular "animal farm." 

Michigan B.A. and Wisconsin Ph.D., Dr. Selove 
served as lecturer at Smith College, visiting assistant 
professor at Columbia, visiting professor at the Na- 
tional University of Mexico, assistant and associate 
professor at Boston University, and lecturer at the 
University of Pennsylvania before becoming Professor 
of Physics at Haverford in 1962. 

Following the Assembly, a reception for the 
speaker and all students honored on this occasion will 
be held in the East Campus Union. Faculty members 
present for the Assembly are cordially invited to 
attend. 

Honors to be announced at this Assembly include 
the Dean's List, Class Honors, and Honorary Class 
Scholarships. Gold D 's will be presented to outstand- 
ing students in the classes of 1965, 1966 and 1967. 
The Dormitory and Sorority with the highest academic 
record for last spring semester will be announced, as 
will elections to Ivy. 



WEEK OF 



Sept.27-Oct.3, 1964 



CALENDAR 



WEEK OF 



Sept.27-Oct. 3, 1964 



OF 



Duke University 




Events of the Week 



Sunday, September 27 

Denominational Meetings. See special notice. 
9:30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. John G. 
Simpson, Student Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Pro- 
fessor James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. 
Sermon: "Peter: the Rock." Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-PM. 



Monday, September 28 



4:00 



p.m. Mathematics Seminar. Room 114 Physics 
Building. Speaker: Professor Jacob Burlak. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology and Botany Seminar. Audi- 
torium of the Biological Sciences Building. 
Speaker: Dr. Klaus Schmidt-Koenig. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women, 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Duke Players' Tryouts for Shake- 
speare's "Much Ado About Nothing." Page 
Auditorium. 

p.m. Woman's College Fall Honors Assembly. 
Baldwin Auditorium. Speaker : Dr. Fay 
Azenberg-Selove. 

p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Facidty 
children wdl be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



7:30 



8:15 



Tuesday, September 29 

3:00-5:00 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Duke Players' 
Tryouts for Shakespeare's "Much Ado About 
Nothing." Page Auditorium. 

3:30-5:00 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
209 Bivins Building. 

4:15-6:00 p.m. Duke Concert Band Rehearsal. 
Room 208 Asbury Building. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women, 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. William 
Frank Halloran for the Ph.D. degree in Eng- 
lish. Room 128 Social Science Building. 

8:00 p.m. Duke Divinity Dames Meeting. 2022 
Campus Drive. Speaker : Dr. Thor Hall. 

Wednesday, September 30 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women, 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:45-7:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Rehearsal. Room 
209 Bivins Building. 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Club. 
Green Room, East Duke Building. Open to All. 

7:00 p.m. Slide Ride Lecture. Room 125 Engi- 
neering Building. 

7:00-8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Murder at the Gallop" with 
Margaret Rutherford, Robert Morley, and 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 202-A Flowers Building, West Campus, not later 

than 1:00 p.m., Wednesday. Extension 2911. 



Flora Robson. A hilarious romp with an 
Agatha Christie mystery. "Margaret Ruther- 
ford is the funniest woman in the world"- — 
Time Magazine. "Delight of delights ... a 
merry chase . . . designed for your pleasure. 
A perpetual joy!" — N. Y. Herald-Tribune. 
Added short subject: Peter Sellers in "The 
Case of the Mukkinese Battle Horn." 



Thursday, October 1 

4:00 p.m. Physiology and Pharmacology Seminar. 
Room M-204. Speaker: Dr. P. Nelson. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women, 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00-6:30 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Indoor Stadium. 

6:00-9:00 p.m. Sorority Rush: Invitational Open 
Houses. Carr Building. 

7:30-9:45 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Re- 
hearsal. Room 208 Asbury Building. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty 
children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



Friday, October 2 

10:00 a.m. Law School Speakers Program. Court 
Room, Law School. Speaker: Francis X. 
Gallagher. 
4:30-6:00 p.m. Duke Marching Band Practice. 

Coombs Field. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6-16, may also swim; those 
12 and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 



Saturday, October 3 

Student Union Golf Tournament (October 
3-24) 

9:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. Dallas 
Milton High for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Library Conference Room. 

2:00 p.m. Varsity Football: Dnke versus Tulane. 
New Orleans, La. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "Murder at the Gallop" with 
Margaret Rutherford, Robert Morley, and Flora 
Robson. A hilarious romp with an Agatha 
Christie mystery. "Margaret Rutherford is 
the funniest woman in the world." — Time 
Magazine. "Delight of delights ... a merry 
chase . . . designed for your pleasure. A 
perpetual joy!" — N. Y. Herald Tribune. 
Added short subject: Peter Sellers in "The 
Case of the Mukkinese Battle Horn." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of 
the Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship on Sunday, September 27th, at 
11 :00 a.m. in the University Chapel. His subject will 
be "Peter: the Rock." The order of service follows: 

The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain 
to the University, Presiding Minister. 

Dr. Douglas M. Knight, President of the Uni- 
versity, Lector. 

Opening Organ Voluntary — Introduction and Passcaglia 

Meger 
Call to Worship — The Lord is in His Holy Temple 

Harrington 
Hymn— "Holy, Holy, Holy!" 
The Prayer of Confession 
Words of Assurance 
The Lord's Prayer 
Anthem—' ' Glory to God ' ' 
Scripture Lesson — Matthew 16:13-20 
Hymn — "O Word of God Incarnate' 
Call to Prayer 
The Pastoral Prayer of Adoration, Thanksgiving, Intercession, 

Petition and Dedication 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "How Lovely is Thy Dwelling Place" 

Johannes Brahms 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Sermon — ' ' Peter : the RoGk ' ' 
Prayer 
Benediction 

Choral Eesponse — "Sevenfold Ame